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Vol.59, nos. 1 -24 

and 5 -16 



September 10, 1987- 

May5, 1988 

and 
September 15, 1988 
December 8, 1988 



LIBRARY 

CLARION STATE COLLEGE 

CLARION. PA. 



Title 


Date 


Page 


1988 Festival Underway 


November 19, 1987 


11 


1988- The Year of the Dragon 


March 3, 1988 


11 


71 Cited in Slippery Rock Raid 


October 29, 1987 


6 


87 Grads Fare Well in Job Market 


September 10, 1987 


6 


A Love Triangle Turns to Happiness 


March 31, 1988 


15 


Abundant Life to Seek Recognition 


Novembers, 1987 


1 


Action in the PSAC 


September 17, 1987 


4 


Activities Day- Students Meet Organizations 


September 10, 1987 


21 


Activity Fee- Do you Know Where your Student Activity Fee Goes? 


March 31, 1988 


5 


Adams, Brad in Campus Close-up 


November 19, 1987 


14 


Agents Should Be Punished 


October 1,1987 


21 


Aid Receivers Must Meet Conditions 


September 24, 1987 


3 


AIDS Brochure Distributed In U.S. 


October 1,1987 


9 


AIDS Programs Initiated 


October 22, 1987 


5 


AIDS Research Sparks Questions, Concerns 


March 3, 1988 


9 


AIDS Victim Leaves School 


September 17, 1987 


8 


AIDS-Clarion AIDS Rumor just rumor According to Red Cross 


April 14, 1988 


1 


Alrbands Blow up a Storm 


March 31, 1988 


18 


Airlines Urged to Regulate Crews 


January 28, 1988 


8 


Alabama Fraternity Becomes Integrated 


October 29, 1987 


6 


Alcohol Policy Just Adheres to Law 


November 12, 1987 


6 


ALF was a Huge Success 


October 8, 1987 


13 


ALF: Another Year 


October 1.1987 


11 


Alumni Scholarship Applications Available 


September 10, 1987 


7 


Alumni Spotlight- Graduate Holds High Position 


October 1,1987 


17 


Alumni Spotlight- Wilshire's Work- a success at Clarion 


October 16, 1987 


11 


Angle named EWL Freshman of the Year 


April 14, 1988 


17 


Angle to Represent USA in Freestyle Match Against Cuban National Team 


March 31, 1988 


19 


Aptitude Test Scores Level Off 


October 8, 1987 


10 


Artificial Turf Project Tabled Until Next Year 


February 25, 1988 


5 


Artist to Lecture in Riemer Center 


October 1,1987 


10 


Arts Festival Contest 


January 28, 1988 


7 


Athletes Sponsored at "Women in Sports" Dinner 


March 31, 1988 


20 


Autumn Celebration Leaves Fond Memories 


October 8, 1987 


8 


Avoid Lemons when Buying a Car 


March 3, 1988 


14 


Award Winner Directs Clarion 


October 29, 1987 


11 


Ballet of Canada to Dance Over CUP 


Novembers, 1987 


17 


Barrouk, Punky in Sports Spotlight 


February 25, 1988 


19 


Baseball- Clarion Baseball Team 4-2 After Spring Trip 


March 31, 1988 


24 


Baseball- Clarion Romps Edinboro 12-2 During Second Game of Double 


April 7, 1988 


13 


Baseball- Close Win for Clarion Team Comes after big lose at lUP 


April 21, 1988 


17 


Baseball Major League Dream in Future 


September 17, 1987 


17 


Baseball Scholarship Awarded 


September 10, 1987 


16 


Baseball Team goes 1-1 


April 28, 1988 


20 


Basketball- Clarion to Host PSAC Women's Basketball Championships 


March 3, 1988 


21 


Basketball- Clarion Upsets Gannon Univ Knights 68-86 


March 3. 1988 


19 


Basketball- Comes Off Shippensburg and Loses to Indiana 


February 4, 1988 


15 


Basketball- CUP Lady Eagles move Within 1 Game of PSAC West Champ 


February 25, 1988 


15 


Basketball- Eagles Faced Scots at Home 


February 18, 1988 


17 


Basketball- Lady Eagles Finish Record Season 


March 31, 1988 


24 


Basketball- Men Have High Hopes for Season 


November 19, 1987 


18 



Basketball- Men's Basketball Team Loses to Hurst and the Rock 


February 11, 1988 


13 


Basketball- Men's Cage Team Breaks into the Win Column 


February 4, 1988 


13 


Basketball: Clarion Grapplers Lose to 11th Ranked Penn State 


February 18, 1988 


IS 


Bermundez becomes two-time recipient of National Hispanic Scholarship 


April 14, 1988 


6 


Besnier out; Lignelli Appointed 


Novembers, 1987 


1 


Biden's Cheated in Past 


October 1,1987 


4 


Biggest Condom Buyers are Campus Women 


October 29. 1987 


4 


Billy Elmer Tickles CUP 


November 19, 1987 


11 


Black History Month Honored 


February 18, 1988 


13 


Black Student Union Works to Break Down Barriers 


March 3, 1988 


8 


Bloodmobile Gets Second Highest Turnout 


October 15, 1987 


5 


Board Approves Request 


October 29, 1987 


8 


Bobby Cummings in Introducing... 


Novembers, 1987 


10 


Bond Visits the Land "down under" on Educational Mission 


April 7, 1988 


5 


Bond, Judy has Projects Recognized 


February 18, 1988 


9 


Bond, Judy: Being First Lady is No Easy Task 


February 18, 1988 


5 


Bork Blasts Sen. Kennedy at Grove City Talk 


February 11, 1988 


1 


Boston Bound Jet Loses Engine 


December 10, 1987 


11 


Brand, Alice in Introducing 


March 3, 1988 


12 


Brass Choir to Perform Classics, Ragtime 


March 31, 1988 


9 


Bridges" Enhances U.S./Soviet Relations 


February 11, 1988 


S 


Broadway Hit "Cabaret Hits Clarion 


February 18, 1988 


9 


Bubb to be Inducted into PA Sports Hall of Fame 


April 28, 1988 


17 


Buck Honored by Home Town 


April 7, 1988 


IS 


Bulimia Reports Inaccurate 


September 24, 1987 


9 


Business Workshops to Benefit Students 


Novembers, 1987 


5 


Bye Bye Brazil: Foreign Film Comes to Clarion 


February 25, 1988 


11 


Campus Close-up... Brett Carter 


October 1,1987 


14 


Campus Close-up... Dana Mauro 


September 24, 1987 


16 


Campus Close-up... Johann von Schrenkel 


October 15, 1987 


13 


Campus Close-up... KimAcquaro 


October 8, 1987 


18 


Campus Prices May Rise Soon 


October 22, 1987 


9 


Career Placement Offers Many Sen/ices For CUP Students 


February 11, 1988 


6 


CB Applications Available 


November 19, 1987 


9 


Cello Recital 


September 24, 1987 


13 


Censorship- Campus Censors Crack down on play 


April 21, 1988 


1 


Center Board: Students Make Things Happen 


September 17, 1987 


13 


Chandler, Kathleen- Former First of Clarion State Teachers College 


April 14, 1988 


5 


Changes Make Ballentine a Better Place to Live 


November 12, 1987 


9 


Charley Dies After week in coma 


October 22, 1987 


1 


Cheerleaders in Sports Spotlight 


Novembers, 1987 


24 


Chemistry Scales Stolen 


Novembers, 1987 


6 


Chinese Group Offers Support and Education 


October 8, 1987 


5 


Christmas in Hungary 


December 10, 1987 


17 


Cities Hit Million Mark 


October 22, 1987 


7 


Clarion Applauds Cole 


December 10, 1987 


16 


Clarion Athletes Named to All-American Teams 


January 28, 1988 


17 


Clarion Dance Company Forms on Campus 


January 28, 1988 


13 


Clarion Graduate Defends Pet in Legal Battle 


January 28, 1988 


1 


Clarion Student Tells of Experiences in Canada 


March 3. 1988 


17 


Clarion: the way it Used to Be 


March 31, 1988 


31 


Class of 1991 Given Encouragement 


September 10, 1987 


5 



dinger Brings Washington to Clarion 


October 29, 1987 


1 


Coach Black Inducted into CSU "Hall of Fame" 


November 12, 1987 


18 


Coach Miller Assumes Dual Role 


September 17, 1987 


18 


Cocaine Kingpin Stands Trail 


November 19, 1987 


8 


Cole, Mike in Sports Spotlight 


February 11, 1988 


15 


Cole, moves on and leaves legacy 


April 21, 1988 


5 


College Costs up This Year 


September 10, 1987 


5 


Computer Center Director Resigns 


November 19, 1987 


5 


Computer Detects Responses 


September 17, 1987 


8 


Computers Improve Campus Departments 


October 15. 1987 


6 


Concert- Stars Come out in Clarion 


April 21, 1988 


12 


Concert to Showcase Classics 


November 19. 1987 


9 


Conference Recruits College Seniors 


October 15. 1987 


6 


Construction Begun on Founders 


September 10. 1987 


7 


Contra Leaders Heckled on Campus 


October 22, 1987 


7 


Convis, Corrin in Sports Spotlight 


November 12. 1987 


20 


Corporate Raiding: the Art of War" 


October 29. 1987 


5 


Cousteau Team Member Comes to CUP 


Octobers, 1987 


10 


CPAs Sponsor Contest 


January 28, 1988 


6 


Crash Shouldn't Affect Students Tuition 


November 12, 1987 


10 


Crime- CUP Students Arraigned on Drug Charges 


Mays, 1988 


1 


Crime- String of Local Robberies Prove Students Vulnerable 


April 14. 1988 


1 


Crise Dares to be diff. W/ ultra-media 


April 21, 1988 


11 


Crooks Clothing: A Store that Stayed in the Business 


April 7, 1988 


9 


Cross Country- Harriers Run at Grove City 


October 15, 1987 


19 


Cross Country off to Good Start 


October 1.1987 


19 


CUP Band Renown for its Excellence 


Octobers. 1987 


11 


CUP Becomes Partner in Rural Education Program 


February 25. 1988 


1 

5 


CUP Book Center's Complimentary Book Problem Not Uncommon 


February 25. 1988 


1 


CUP Commended for Periodic Report 


September 24. 1987 


1 


CUP Creates a Link with Ireland 


September 17, 1987 


9 


CUP Default Rate Lower them National 


February 4, 1988 


1 


CUP Gets Rural Education Grant 


February 4, 1988 


5 


CUP Goes Underwater 


October 15. 1987 


12 


CUP Grads Show Success in Job Hunt 


December 10, 1987 


5 


CUP Hits Record Enrollment 


September 10. 1987 


21 


CUP Hun Judo 


October 15. 1987 


19 


CUP Men Chapter Recognized 


February 4. 1988 


9 


CUP Professor Heads Leadership Program 


October 29, 1987 


9 


CUP Professor Taught Series in Brazil 


Octobers, 1987 


6 


CUP Professor to Present Series 


October 22. 1987 


5 


CUP Public Safety are "Real Policemen" 


November 12. 1987 


1 


CUP Student Named Volunteer of the Year 


November 19. 1987 


9 


CUP to Host Congressional Hearing 


October 22. 1987 


6 


CUP'S Fire System Tightens Campus Safety 


January 28, 1988 


1 


D.A. Awaiting Word on Appeal 


September 10, 1987 


1 


Daryl Taylor Feels "at home" in Clarion 


Novembers, 1987 


18 


Davis is New Home for Speech Pathology 


February 4, 1988 


7 


Dean of Business Adm. Steps Down 


November 12, 1987 


1 


Delta Chi Runs to Pgh. For Special Olympics 


April 14, 1988 


7 


Desktop System to be Introduced 


December 10, 1987 


8 


Development- Arrogance Poses Threat to Decisions Concerning Major Dev 


April 14, 1988 


6 



Different Themes Mesh for Comedy 



Directory Excludes Professors' Numbers 
Dirty Da ncing" in the 60's? 



Disabilies can Enhance , not Inhibit, Life 



Divers vs. Oaklan d U. 

Dollar's Drop Increas es Car Prices 



PQ''"^l,iggQijra9 e Alcohol Awareness 

DPMA^cJTOIarshlp^ Receives scholarship 



Dr. Slattery Works to Build "B ridges For Peace" 



Dr. Stal ker Interested in World Education 



Dr. William Suggs... Introducing 



Drama- A SavageTragedy Expertly Performed 



Drop/Add Change Approved 



Dropout Money Woes 



Dropouts Likely to Default on Loans 



Dry Rush Helps Greek Image 



Economy Club Returns Campus 



Ed Majors Avoid Inner-City Schools 



Eicher, Jeffrey in Introducing 



Emminger, Doug in Sports Spotlight 



Enrollment Up in '86 



Ernissee to Lead Geoscience Association 



Ewing- Silver and Gold Us ed in Halloware Art 



Facilities Become Available 



Faculty Approves 3 Year Contract 



Faculty Approves Course Proposal Deadline 



Faculty Contract Includes Pay Raise 

Faculty Develops Solid Philosophy for CUP General Education 



Faculty Discuss AIDS Concerns 



Faculty Gives Thumbs Down to Early Publication of Final Exam Times 



Faculty Senate- Reinstates Mid-year Suspension Policy 



Faculty Senate Tackles Football Field Issue 



Fake ID's Cause Penalties 



Farm Students Work More Jobs 
Fashion Moves Leftward 



FBI Asks Libraries to Help Find Spies 



FBI Recruits at CUP 



Fellowship Offered to Minorities 



Festival for People of All Ages 



Festival Offers Something for Everyone 



Figure Drawing at CUP 



Fire Safety Adequate 



Flag Football Heads Intramural Schedule 
Flaherty, John in SportsSpotlight 



Florida Students on a Hunt 



Food, bus Service to Continue at Manor 



Football Already in Traininc i 



Football- Big Win for Eagles 



Football- Blue-G old Football Game Results 



Football- Clarion Hosts "THE ROCK" 



Football- Defeat 'The Rock," Jump into Top 20 



Football- Defense Does Job in 35-0 Win 



March 3, 1988 



September 24, 1987 



October 8, 1987 



April 7, 1988 



January 28, 1988 



November 12, 1987 



October 22, 1987 



Mays, 1988 



February 11, 1988 



September 24, 1987 



October 22, 1987 



April 28, 1988 



December 10, 1987 



December 10, 1987 



October 8, 1987 



September 24, 1987 



October 1,1987 



October 29, 1987 



January 28, 1988 



November 19, 1987 



November 19, 1987 



December 10, 1987 



April 14, 1988 



February 4, 1988 



Octobers, 1987 



November 12, 1987 



October 1, 1987 



March 31, 1988 



October 29, 1987 



February 25, 1988 



April 28, 1988 



February 11, 1988 



September 10, 1987 



December 10, 1987 



October 15, 1987 



February 4, 1988 



February 11. 1988 



October 8, 1987 



April 14, 1988 



December 10, 1987 



December 10, 1987 



October 22, 1987 



Octobers, 1987 



March 3, 1988 



December 10, 1987 



November 19, 1987 



April 14, 1988 



September 24, 1987 



May 5, 1988 



October 1, 1987 



Octobers, 1987 



November 12. 1987 



13 



16 



8 



17 



17 



14 



11 



8 



14 



24 



10 



11 



11 



8 



11 



8 



11 



14 



13 



21 



23 



15 



20 



23 



23 



21 



17 



Footba 



Footba 



Footba 



Footba 



Footba 



Footba 



Footba 



Footba 



Footba 



Footba 



Footba 



Footba 



Footba 



Footba 



Footba 



Footba 



Footba 



Footba 



Footba 



Footba 



Footba 



Division al Race Highlights PSAC 



Eag les Down Vulcans 17-14 



- Eagles Fall to I.U.P. 



- Eagles Lose 14-8 in Opener 



Eagles Open Conference Play 



Eagles Sharp in 69-14 Win 



Eagles to Battle Lock Haven 



Eagles to Face PSAC- East Foe 



Emminger PSAC Player of the Week 



Emminger PSAC Player of the Week Again 



Extends NCAA Record 



Golden Eagles at Home to Host Edinboro 



Gridders Roll Over Edinboro 



- Harriers Win Season Finale 



Injury Problems Hamper Eagles 



PSAC "Player of the Week 



PSAC Races take Shape 



PSAC Showdown on Saturday 



- Time Runs out on Eagle Season 



Tri-Captains Named 



Welcomes New Assistant 



Foreign Study- Behind the Iron Curtain 



Forensic Team- Three Members Talked Their way to Nationals 



Former Student Charged with Computer Theft 



Four Campuses Await Pope's Visit 



Four Receive Scholarship Awards 



Frat Crackdown Brings Results 



Fraternity Dribbles to Fight Leukemia 



Glenn, Leo in Campus Close-up 



Grade Distribution Study Reveals "B" as average CUP Grade 



Freshman Join Honors Program 



GADFLY is Really Buzzin g 



Gala Concert plays Tribute to Bond 



Godspell to Give Modernized Performance 



Golf- Golf Finishes 1 1th Out of 20 at Allegheny Invitational 



Golf Team Finishes 4th 



Good News for PHEAA Recipients 



Gov't Won't Punish Violators 



Grad Ceremonies Slated for Indoors 



Grads to Recruit Potential Students 



Graduation- Bond Refutes Student Plea for Outdoor Ceremony 



Graduation Pays 



Grant Brings New Tutorial 



Gray Retires After 21 Years at CUP 



Greater Tuna": a Comedy Full of Laughs 



Greek- Through Community involvement CUP Greek System has improved 
Greek Week- Greeks gave 100% During Greek Week 



Greek-Lambda Zeta Tau becomes Clarion's newest local sorority 



GreenPeace Dedicated to Non-Violence 



Groups to Seek Recognition after 6 Month Freeze 



Grove Wins Award 



Grunenwald Chosen as New Dean of Businesses Admin. 



Octobers, 1987 



October 1,1987 



October 15, 1987 



September 17, 1987 



September 24, 1987 



Novembers, 1987 



October 29, 1987 



October 22, 1987 



September 24, 1987 



October 22, 1987 



October 29, 1987 



October 15, 1987 



October 22, 1987 



October 29, 1987 



September 10, 1987 



Octobers, 1987 



October 15, 1987 



Octobers, 1987 



November 19, 1987 



September 10, 1987 



September 10, 1987 



September 17, 1987 



April 14, 1988 



January 28, 1988 



September 10, 1987 



September 10, 1987 



September 10, 1987 



Novembers, 1987 



September 10, 1987 



April 7, 1988 



October 1,1987 



April 7. 1988 



October 1,1987 



April 28, 1988 



October 29, 1987 



March 3, 1988 



October 22, 1987 



April 7. 1988 



Mays. 1988 



Octobers, 1987 



April 28, 1988 



October 22, 1987 



September 24, 1987 



January 28, 1988 



Octobers, 1987 



April 14, 1988 



April 28, 1988 



April 21, 1988 



October 22, 1987 



March 31, 1988 



December 10, 1987 



April 28, 1988 



24 



20 



15 



15 



19 



19 



17 



23 



20 



21 



15 



17 



20 



16 



15 



22 



15 



23 



21 



17 



16 



11 



8 



12 



10 



11 



17 



19 



11 



8 



15 



8 



13 



8 



11 



10 



24 



GSL's May Be Cut at "Debtor Schools" 


November 12, 1987 


10 


Gurecka to Conduct Maine Workout 


Octobers, 1987 


10 


Halloween Comes Alive in Clarion 


October 29, 1987 


13 


Hamilton Says Her Art is "Positive Magic" 


October 1,1987 


11 


Harassment Problems Probed 


September 24, 1987 


9 


Hardware Store and Opera House Rolled up in one at Ditz's Gifts 


March 31, 1988 


13 


Haskell Furniture has an Intriguing History Behind it 


February 25, 1988 


11 


Hazing Law Made Stronger 


September 17, 1987 


8 


Healing Arts Workshop Slated 


Octobers, 1987 


7 


Hearings Scheduled at CUP 


September 17, 1987 


8 


Hearings Slated to Discuss Problems 


October 1.1987 


6 


Held, Sue in Campus Close-up 


February 18, 1988 


14 


Heming Accepts Position as General Manager 


October 22. 1987 


12 


Heritage Week Celerates Black Achievements 


March 31. 1988 


7 


Hetrick Continues Role as Acting Dean of Education and Human Services 


April 28. 1988 


9 


Hicks, Brad in campus close-up 


May 5. 1988 


19 


High Donor Turnout Expected 


September 17. 1987 


5 


Holman, Tammy in Sports Spotlight 


February 18, 1988 


15 


Homecoming Queen Candidates Announced 


October 1,1987 


9 


Honoring Black History Month 


January 28, 1988 


14 


Honors Program is a Huge Success 


November 19, 1987 


15 


Horgan Debates Irish North/South 


December 10, 1987 


9 


Horner, Flaherty, Angle Wrestle at Division 1 Champs to Bring Clarion 37 


March 31. 1988 


22 


Housing Changes Fulfill Student Needs 


September 17. 1987 


5 


Huwar, Bryan in Introducing... 


April 14, 1988 


12 


Hwei-Jen Yang Introducing 


October 29, 1987 


12 


lABC Witnessed Pure Professionalism at JMU 


April 7. 1988 


6 


IFC/Panhel Greek Fest in the Planning Stages 


February 25. 1988 


9 


Institute to Award 60 Fellowships 


October 15. 1987 


8 


International Business Meeting Set 


October 15, 1987 


5 


International Program Available 


March 3, 1988 


12 


Internship Given in Competition 


September 24, 1987 


3 


Intramural Finals 


October 29. 1987 


18 


Intramurals- CUP Intramurals 


October 15. 1987 


16 


Introducing . . . Carta Young 


October 15. 1987 


12 


Introducing... Dr. Donald Wilson 


Octobers. 1987 


16 


Introducing... Dr. Mary Ann McLaughlin 


October 1.1987 


12 


Introducing... Mr. Christian Faust 


September 17, 1987 


11 


Introducing... Mr. William Lloyd 


September 24. 1987 


12 


Irish Journalist to Speak on Role of Media 


November 19, 1987 


5 


It is it is" Greater Tuna 


October 22, 1987 


11 


It's Laughter at its Best 


October 29, 1987 


13 


Jackson Officially in Presidential Race 


October 15. 1987 


8 


January Thaw Strikes Clarion 


January 28, 1988 


15 


Japanese Artist in Clarion 


November 5, 1987 


9 


Jazz Great Dizzy Celebrates 70th Birthday at CUP 


October 22. 1987 


11 


Judo- Four Members Place at Tournament 


January 28. 1988 


18 


Kahn Chairs Panel on Asian Studies 


Octobers. 1987 


9 


Kapres, Rick in Campus Close-up 


January 28, 1988 


16 


Kapusnik Sentenced to 60 Days 


Octobers, 1987 


1 


Klan Carvings Revive Racism Fears 


November 19. 1987 


10 


Kline, "Bucky" Retires 


February 18. 1988 


16 



KonitskyFuTds Boo ks of Spells 
kuehn, Myrna in Introducing... 



LeapYeaFb ay: Party Hardy or Save the Rhino's? 

Library- Clireer Concerns, Assignments Spark Increased Library Use 



Lab Improv es Study Skills 



Library Cen ter Offers New Opportuniti es 



Librar y Science Celebrates 50th Anniversary 



Library Service Hours Questioned 



Lieutenan t Gov, to Appear at Venango 
Life's F lickering Flame 



Little Sister Groups to be Discontinued 



Little Sisters Removal Questioned 



Live from Clarion... It's Nora Dunn 



Living inside Jim Morrison 



Loan Default rate Rises 



Local and Regional Cash Streams to GO MAC in April 



Local Bars are Looking at I.D.'s 



Loomis- Captain Loomis: a War Hero 



Macintosh SE in Introducing 



Major Burns to Perform 



Manor Changes to Accommodate Students 



Manor Lease May Not be Renewed 



Manor to Become Private Housing 



Many Agree College Costs Too Much 



Many React to Door Opening Polic y 



Marable Brings Black Politics to Clarion 



Ma rasco, Damian in Spors Spotlight 



Marina Barnett... Campus Close-up 



Mark McDonough in Campus Close-up 



Mark Wallace in Sports Spotlight 



Mars. Marti n in Campus Close-up 



MASH- Burns Lives Within Linville 



McAdoo, Lisa in Sports Spotlight 



McDonald. Tom in Campus Close-up 



McKe ag, D'Arcy in Campus Close-up 



McKeever Offers Students Outdoor Ed. 



Michael, Jane... Campus Close up 



Milk Crate Amnesty Deemed a Success 



Milk Crates Appear as New Law Takes Effect 



Miller Honored by Hometown 



Minority Enrollment Slow to Increase 



Minority Fellowships Available 



MMM 



More Music at WCUC 



More Parking in the Planning 



Most Campuses Offer Some Not so Serious Classes 



Move for Bookstore Under Consideration 



Mr. Rude" Retums to CUP 



Music Department Presents Open House 



Musical Performance SupertJ 



Musical, Comedy Talents Showcased 



Nair Hall Beach Slated for Future Parking and Recreational Facilities 



December 10. 1987 



February 11, 1988 



Septe mber 24, 1987 



February 25, 1988 



April 14, 1988 



November 19, 1987 



October 29. 1987 



October 22. 1987 



March 31. 1988 



October 22, 1987 



Octobers, 1987 



October 1,1987 



Octobers, 1987 



November 12, 1987 



October 1.1987 



Fe bruary 25, 1988 



September 24, 1987 



May 5, 1988 



March 31. 1988 



September 10. 1987 



February 4. 1988 



October 15, 1987 



November 12, 1987 



September 24, 1987 



October 29, 1987 



March 31, 1988 



April 7. 1988 



October 22, 1987 



November 5. 1987 



October 22, 1987 



March 31, 1988 



September 24, 1987 



March 31, 1988 



December 10. 1987 



March 3. 1988 



September 24, 1987 



November 12, 1987 



January 28, 1988 



December 10, 1987 



April 21, 1988 



October 29, 1987 



November 12, 1987 



February 11, 1988 



September 10, 1987 



October 22. 1987 



February 25. 1988 



October 15. 1987 



November 12. 1987 



October 22. 1987 



October 8. 1987 



October 1, 1987 



March 31, 1988 



10 



8 



11 



10 



11 



17 



11 



10 



13 



32 



13 



14 



16 



16 



24 



30 



11 



20 



16 



15 



12 



17 



10 



8 



11 



18 



Nero Depicts Toda/s^ociety in his Paintings 



New Bridge is Well Received 



N®w^^nriputeM-abOpened 



New Events Slated For ALF 
New Face Behind the Scenes 



New Games Involve More than the Roll of the Dice 



New Greek Advisor Wants to Help Students 

New International Minor Teaches Students Global Awareness 



New SCJ Members Initiated 
New Senators Introduced 



New Student Union in CUP's Near Future 



New Tippin Entrance 
New Turf on Hold 



Ngo -DinhTu... Introducing 

North's Slide Show Becomes Campus Hit 



Objects Stimulate the Imagination 



Oliver Elected to be NSTA Division II Director 



Olympics;-juggs t o Conduct Ballistics Tests for 1988 Summer Olym 
Paralegal Studies OK'd for Venango Campus 



Peace Corps Seek Volunteers 



Peck, Brenda in Campus Close-up 



Pena, Eric in Cam pus Close-up 



Peters, Kristan in Campus Close-up 



Petitions for Candidates Available 



Peura, Dave in Sports Spotlight 



Pitt Honors Coach Bubb 



Pittsburgh Honors Charley 



Pizza Vandels Caught 



Plagiarizing Professor Apologizes 



Pocta, Patty in Campus Close-up 



Poems Now Being Accepted 



Pop Police Nab Thirsty Stud ents 



Postcard Collecting Becomes Wide Spread 



Poster Sale Continues 
Post-Gazette Critic Honors Charley 
Preliminary Budget Indicates No Deficit 



Preliminary CUP Budget Hints at Deficit 



Presentations to Commemorate Murders 



President Parades to Explain Tuition 



President's Contract Extended by Trustee's for One Year 
Price to Send Letters Hiked up to a Quarter 



Prof in Serious Condition After Car Wreck 



Professional Football- NFL Strike was a Travesty 



Profs Book Receives Critical Acclaim 



Program Assists ROTC Students 

Program Geared to Unite Young with Old 
Program was a Success 



Prospective Students Visit CUP 



PSAC Conference Play on Saturday 



PSAC Races Heating Up 



Public Safety move to move central location 
Public SafetyPatrol Stepped up on ALF 



March 3, 1988 



September 17, 1987 



September 17, 1987 



September 17, 1987 



October 22, 1987 



March 3. 1988 

November 12, 1987 



March 3. 1988 



October 22, 1987 



November 19, 1987 



April 7, 1988 



January 28, 1988 



February 18, 1988 



November 12, 1987 



November 12, 1987 



November 5, 1987 



April 14, 1988 



March 3, 1988 



February 4, 1988 



November 5, 1987 



October 29, 1987 



February 25, 1988 



February 11, 1988 



October 8, 1987 



February 4, 1988 



Novembers, 1987 



January 28, 1988 



October 29, 1987 



November 12, 1987 



April 14, 1988 



December 10, 1987 



March 31, 1988 



February 18, 1988 



November 12, 1987 



March 3, 1988 



February 25, 1988 



November 19, 1987 



November 19, 1987 



September 24, 1987 



April 7, 1988 



March 31, 1988 



October 15, 1987 



October 22, 1987 



December 10, 1987 



October 8, 1987 



October 15, 1987 



September 24, 1987 



October 1,1987 



September 24, 1987 



October 1, 1987 



May 5, 1988 



Octobers. 1987 



13 



15 



11 



15 



13 



8 



19 



15 



20 



14 



13 



11 



8 



16 



22 



8 



13 



17 



25 



25 



22 



12 



23 



21 









Publications Offers New Services 


December 10, 1987 


5 


Raabe, Ken in Sports Spotlight 


October 29, 1987 


20 


RACS Becomes a Major Part of Campus 


October 1,1987 


13 


Radio- Local Jocks tell tales of life on ain/vaves 


April 21, 1988 


10 


Ranger Challenge Leads the Way 


Novembers, 1987 


9 


Reaching Out to Victims 


January 28, 1988 


5 


Readers"- Help Meet the Needs of the Disabled 


February 11, 1988 


5 


Recent Renovations are a Small Part of Riemer's Numerous Services 


March 3, 1988 


5 


Record Turnout Expected for Bloodmobile Visit 


January 28, 1988 


6 


Reluctant Bank Forces Colleges to Close 


October 22, 1987 


4 


Remodeling, Additions and Repairs to CUP Facilities in Planning Stages 


March 31. 1988 


8 


Reports Indicate Rise in Fall Enrollment 


Novembers, 1987 


7 


Research Pays Off for Dr. Westerkamp 


February 4. 1988 


11 


Reverend Knocks CUP's Socks Off 


October 22, 1987 


12 


Richard will Leave his Marx in Clarion 


April 7, 1988 


9 


Riding the Wings of Success 


Novembers, 1987 


9 


Riemer Student center- Renovation and expansion 


April 21, 1988 


6 


Rondoliers to Perform in Clarion 


November 19, 1987 


17 


Rookey, Thomas Venango Dean- Man of the Year 


February 18, 1988 


1 


Room and Board Increase Established for Fall '88 


January 28, 1988 


6 


Room and Board Increase to be Used for Services, Maintenance 


February 18, 1988 


6 


ROTC Takes to the Water 


September 10, 1987 


13 


Roving Reporter: How do you like the new mascot? 


September 24, 1987 


15 


Running- CUP Runs at Championship 


November 12, 1987 


20 


Rush Starts 


September 17, 1987 


14 


Russian Club Open to Entire Community 


October 15, 1987 


10 


SAFE Lends Hand to CUP Students 


Novembers, 1987 


1 


SAO Sponsors Leadership Workshops 


October 22, 1987 


6 


Satrical Theatre Company Performs With Puppets 


January 28, 1988 


13 


Scandal Shaked the College Republicans 


February 4, 1988 


10 


Schmidt, Jack in Introducing 


March 31, 1988 


16 


SCJ- brings professional communicators to "Spring Speak" 


April 21, 1988 


9 


Scotty Beams Up Mr. Sulu to Clarion 


November 19, 1987 


11 


Senate discusses budgets for next year 


April 21, 1988 


8 


Senate Plans Riemer Renovations 


September 24, 1987 


7 


Senate- Senate Suggests Possible Site Change for Grad. Ceremony 


April 14, 1988 


7 


Senate Wraps up the semester and discusses future goals and changes 


Mays, 1988 


6 


Senior Sendoff Slated 


Mays, 1988 


5 


Senior Spotlight: Campus Close-Up 


September 17, 1987 


10 


Seniors: Mock Interviews Offered 


September 17, 1987 


14 


Series Addresses Worid Issues 


November 19, 1987 


10 


Sessoms Named Black Achiever 


January 28, 1988 


7 


Sexual Harassment- CUP Ad hoc Committee Working to combat... 


Mays, 1988 


5 


Shaffer, Denny in Campus Close-up 


March 31, 1988 


14 


Silvis- One of Top 20 to Watch In '88 


February 11, 1988 


9 


Singh, Sarjit in Introducing 


December 10, 1987 


15 


Ski Package Available 


December 10, 1987 


12 


Smith Displays His Books 


September 24, 1987 


13 


Smith, Magestro Fill Positions 


Octobers, 1987 


24 


Smoking Ban- hearing held for poss. Ban on campus 


Mays, 1988 


7 


Softball- Harding Named New Head Coach 


March 3, 1988 


19 


Softball- Harding Shooting for 50% Season 


March 31, 1988 


23 



I 



%"' 



Softball Team at 3-15 


April 28, 1988 


18 :^lv 


Solutions to Parking Problem Discussed 


October 15, 1987 


7 


Sons of Ace will Be Jammin' 


December 10, 1987 


14 ' ?: 


Speeldeel "IHNA" Dazzles CUP 


September 17, 1987 


9 ii 


Sponsors Needed to Lend a Hand For Holidays 


December 10, 1987 


9 I- 


Sports Spotlight... on Barb Buck 


October 1,1987 


24 i 


Sports Spotlight... on Denise Johnson 


October 15, 1987 


20 


Sports Spotlight... on Jerry Fedell 


September 24, 1987 


24 


Sports Spotlight... on Phil Popielski 


October 8, 1987 


28 


Sports Spotlight... on Sue Fritz 


September 17, 1987 


16 


Spozio, Kathy in Introducing... 


February 18, 1988 


10 


Spring Break Shortened 


September 24, 1987 


1 


SSHE Offers a Summer of Education 


February 11, 1988 


7 


Star Trax Recording 


March 3, 1988 


7 


Store Plans Postponed 


November 19, 1987 


7 


Student Alumni- Org. is Learning More 


October 1,1987 


18 


Student Center Referendum Approved by Senate 


April 28, 1988 


8 


Student Enrollment Grows to 89,500 in the 14 State Owned Universities 


December 10, 1987 


1 


Student Enrollment Up at CUP 


September 10, 1987 


1 


Student Habits Changing 


December 10, 1987 


11 


Student Hold Teach-in 


November 19, 1987 


7 


Student Liaison Resigns as Education Link 


October 1,1987 


8 


Student Loan Requirements Stricter 


November 12, 1987 


8 


Student Senate- Director Terminated for Misuse of Funds 


November 12, 1987 


5 


Student Senate Elections 


Novembers, 1987 


11 


Student Senate- New Student Leaders Appointed 


December 10, 1987 


8 


Student Senate- No More Winter Grad Ceremony? 


September 17, 1987 


7 


Student Senate- Senate is Active Voice on Campus 


October 8. 1987 


7 


Student Senate- Senate Questions Administrative Decisions 


Novembers, 1987 


6 


Student Senate- Senators Appointed to Committee Positions 


January 28, 1988 


7 


Student Senate- Senators Represent Students at Presidential Review 


February 4, 1988 


5 


Student Senate- Seventy Campus Organizations Represented at Student 


March 3, 1988 


6 


Student Senate- Stricter Underage Drink Fines Announced at Sen. 


February 25, 1988 


6 


Student Senate- Students Elected to Senate Committees 


October 29, 1987 


10 


Student Senate to Vote on Appropriations for All-Session Swim Passes 


February 11, 1988 


8 


Student Spirit Award 


Novembers, 1987 


19 


Students Asked to Affirm Eligibility - 


September 17, 1987 


7 


Students' Geography Knowledge is Depressing 


January 28, 1988 


7 


Students Receive Scholarships 


Octobers, 1987 


11 


Students Should Be Ad Conscious 


December 10, 1987 


5 


Students Think Little About Sex 


September 24, 1987 


7 


Students Wait for Black Flag U's Findings 


March 31, 1988 


30 


Stuhldryer Discusses Ethics in Business 


April 7, 1988 


5 


Summer Dance '88 Scholarship Auditions 


March 3, 1988 


5 


Swimmers Finish Bust Weekend 


January 28, 1988 


17 


Swimmers Win on the Road 


February 4, 1988 


13 


Swimming- Clarion Swimming Over Shippensburg and Edinboro 


February 11, 1988 


14 


Swimming- CU Captures 1988 PSAC Swim and Diving Championships 


February 25, 1988 


15 


Swimming- CU Hosting the 1988 PSAC Swimming & Diving Champion 


February 18, 1988 


19 


Swimming- Men's 3rd, Women's 4th at Division II Swimming Champions 


March 31, 1988 


19 


Tap May Have Done in Nominee 


December 10, 1987 


6 


Tax Workshop Set 


Octobers, 1987 


10 



r 



Resigns as Men's Head Basketball Coach at CUP 






Tbi o T to Give Tenor Recital 



[Teach ers Improve with CUP's Help 
I 1 drears as Head Coach Over 



>- Golden Eagle Tennis Team Shines in Victory over Division 1 Pitt 



1 .. IS- Lady Eagles Competes in Rolex Tournament 



^ ^nnis- Lady Eagles Successfully Defend PSAC Tennis Title 



Tennis- S pirits High on Tennis Team 



Tennis- Striving Toward Excellence 



Tennis Team Begins SPr. Schedule Looking to be Nominated to Nationals 



Tennis Team Earns Second Place at New Jersy Tournament 



ennis- Team Finishes Undefeated Dual Meet Year 



Tennis- Team Nominated to Nationals 



Tennis Team Still Winning 



Tennis Team to Defend PSAC Title 



Tennis- Women's Tennis Team Nominated to Nationals 



The Need for General Education in Nursing 



The Winner is... Vicky Amsdell 



Thorton Retires after 17 Years of Success and Achievement at Clarion 



Thousands of Students May Lose all or Part of Pell Grants in '88-89 



Time to Cram for Exams 



Time to Pay Taxes 



Track- Buck Qualifies for States at Penn State Invitational 



Track- CUP Tack Teams Open '88 Season 



Track- Grove City Topples to CUP Women's Track Team 



Track- Strong Showing by Track Team at SR's "Early Bird Meet" 



Track- Team Members Score Personal Best 



Track Teams Improving w/ Each Outing 



Tuna Raises Money 



Tutoring Center Helps Students Cope 
Tutoring Center Moves to Davis 



TV 5 Took their Show on the Road and Came Back a Success 



TV-5 has Big Plans For Future 



U2 Live is Raw Power 



Univ. 'Disenrolls' Student 



Universities Battle Over Artifacts 



University Cracks Down on Racism 



University Will Not Renew Forest Manor Lease 



Urbansky, Ron Player of the Week 



Vento, Frank in Introducing. 



Vernick, Bob in Sports Spotlight 



Views Exchanged Concerning Policies 



Violence is No Stronger to CUP 



Volleyball- Eagles Battle in Volleyball Tri-Matches 



Volleyball Find it Tough at East Stroudsburg 



Volleyball- Finished Fourth in PSAC 



Volleyball has Success at Navy 



Volleyball- Lady Netters Post Significant Win 



Volleyball- Lady Netters Shine at Home 



Volleyball- Play in Connecticut Tournament 



Volleyba ll Team Ends Season 



Volleyball Team has Trouble 



March 31, 1988 



October 29. 1987 



November 12, 1987 



December 10, 1987 



October 29, 1987 



Novembers, 1987 



October 22. 1987 



October 1, 1987 



September 10, 1987 



April 14. 1988 



April 21, 1988 



April 28, 1988 



Mays, 1988 



Septembers, 1987 



October 15, 1987 



Mays. 1988 



September 17, 1987 



Octobers, 1987 



April 7. 1988 



February 18. 1988 



December 10. 1987 



April 7. 1988 



March 3. 1988 



February 11. 1988 



April 28, 1988 



March 31, 1988 



February 18, 1988 



April 14, 1988 



September 10. 1987 



February 4. 1988 



September 10. 1987 



March 31. 1988 



October 16. 1987 



October 22, 1987 



Octobers, 1987 



November 12, 1987 



October 1, 1987 



October 29. 1987 



October 29. 1987 



February 25. 1988 



December 10, 1987 



Novembers, 1987 



November 19, 1987 



Octobers, 1987 



Novembers, 1987 



November 19, 1987 



September 17, 1987 



October 29, 1987 



September 24, 1987 



October 15. 1987 



December 10, 1987 



October 1, 1987 



19 



11 



23 



15 



23 



19 



22 



15 



15 



17 



15 



23 



18 



18 



13 



13 



22 



15 



15 



21 



16 



18 



11 



11 



13 



12 



16 



12 



24 



22 



21 



22 



15 



18 



19 



16 



19 



22 



1 



yo['6^MLIeamSe^ForJ^als^ 



Vdunteer Slated to Show Effects of Alcohol 



von Schrenkel Names Rotary Scholar 



^MI^QLMMs public to wo rk towa r ds mak ing & keeping peacejnNuclear 



War mer Weather Hei g htens Student [nvolvement in Alcohol Activities' 

Washington . Joanne. .. A New Face in the Communication Dep t. 

Weiss, GeraldTNationaTGuard Captain Enlightens Clarion Studen"te~ 
West Germany Depicted by Col lege Student 



Wilkinson RD Strives For Deve lopment of Students' Leadership Qualities 

Wilson Named V.P. of Publication 

Wing to Perform " ~ 



Winter Grad Ceremony Ok'd 



Women's Basketball- Lady Cadgers Try to Repeat 
Woods, Sharon in Introducing^ 



Woody Allen's Success Hits Clarion 



Workshop Gives Racism Remedies 



Wrest 



Wrest 



Wrest 



Wrest 



Wrest 



Wrest! 



Wrest 



Wrest 



ers Improve Reco rd to 3 and 9 



ers Take 4th in PSACs at Bloomsburg 



ing- Clarion Loses to 7th Ranked Lock Haven to Finish Season 4-12 



ing- Cubans Defeat Americans During Freestyle Match at Edinboro 
ing- CUP Wrestling Fans Get Pre view 



jng- Eagles Lose to Scots, Beat the Irish 



ing- Grapplers Return From the Road; 1 win- 1 loss 



ing- Off to a Slow Start 



Wright, Alan a Seargent Major Reenlists 



November 12, 1987 



October 15, 1987 



February 18, 1988 



Mays, 1988 



April 14, 1988 



October 22, 1987 



February 18, 1988 



March 31, 1988 



February 25, 1988 



February 4, 1988 



February 25, 1988 



October 22, 1987 



November 19, 1987 



April 7, 1988 



November 19, 1987 



November 19, 1987 



February 11, 1988 



February 4, 1988 



March 3, 1988 



April 7, 1988 



November 19, 1987 



January 28, 1988 



February 25, 1988 



December 10, 1987 



February 4, 1988 



17 



8 



11 



17 



13 



13 



8 



18 



11 



17 



8 



13 



14 



21 



13 



21 



19 



17 



19 



I 

I 



■ 

i 



WELCOME BACK 




Student Enrollment Up At CUP 




by Liz Koones, 
News Editor 



Increases in revenue and 
student enrollment for the 
1987-88 school year highlighted 
President Bond's faculty wel- 
come address. The Presi- 
dent's Sept. 2 address was at- 
tended by a large number of 
old and new faculty. 

Bond announced that enroll- 
ment is up this year. As of that 
day, 6,190 students were en- 
rolled either full- or part-time 
at the university. Full-time en- 
rollment at Venango campus 
has also increased. He attri- 



buted the increase to the lower 
credit/hour cost that Qarion 
offers in comparison to other 
universities. 

Due to the increase in en- 
rollment, the university has 
received $1.8 million in new 
revenue to work with. Bond 
also stated that faculty and 
staff salaries have increased 
8.5 percent and that employee 
benefits are up 13.4 percent. 

At the conclusion of Presi- 
dent Bond's address, Mr. Wil- 
liam Fulmer, Clarion Univer- 
sity President of APSCUF 
(Association of Pennsylvania 



State College and University 
Faculties), spoke about the 
tentative three-year contract 
proposed by the state. The 
pact includes salary increases 
for faculty of five and one half 
percent in the first year, five 
percent in the second and five 
and one half in the third. "We 
got all there was to get," said 
Fulmer. "Personally, I'm not 
quite sure that we did." 

AU faculty who have served 
eight years or more wiU re- 
ceive a five percent raise over 
the three years, which is a 7.3 
percent increase. Faculty who 




President Thomas A. Bond 



have served four to seven 
years will also be given a five 
percent raise. The Health and 
Welfare fund will also receive 
a 10* increase over three 
years. 

"Most of you will do better," 
Fulmer told the audience. 
"We didn't give away any- 
thing. We're getting tougher 
and I think we should be." 

The new contract must be 
ratified by the faculty. A gen- 
eral meeting will be held be- 
fore the actual voting. The 
voting is tentatively scheduled 
for the end of September. 



Vol.59 No. 1 



Thursday, September 10, 1987 



LARION 



CALL 



flBSiRi UniuEXiittj of ^enniyU 



aanta 



D.A. awaiting word on appeal 



by Deborah M. Schofield, 

Editor in Chief 

Qarion County District At- 
torney William Kern is 
awaiting word from the Penn- 
sylvania Superior Court after 
filing for appeal in the Kapus- 
nik case June 16. 



Judge Merle E. Wiser dis- 
missea homicide and aggra- 
vated assault charges against 
Michael Kapusnik, 23, May 18 
after halting the trial before 
the defense began its presen- 
tation. 

Wiser granted the defense's 
request for a demurrer saying 



that Kern had failed to dis- 
prove two possible defenses to 
the crime. According to 
Wiser, "A demurrer is proper- 
ly granted only if the prosecu- 
tion's evidence. . .is insuffi- 
cient to support a jury's find- 
ings that the defendant was 
guilty without a reasonable 




HIGH BOOK PRICES are only one of the predicaments students tilce Brian Johnson face upon returning to CUP. 

Photo by Mike Bordo, Photography Editor 



doubt. 

Kapusnik, a former CUP 
student from Natrona 
Heights, was accused of stab- 
bing two CUP students last 
November 16 outside a Main 
Street pizza parlor when they 
interrupted a fight between 
Kapusnik and his girlfriend. 
One student died. The former 
U.S. Marine pleaded guilty to 
one count of simple assault. 

Wiser ruled that Kern failed 
to disprove: (1) that Kapusnik 
acted in self-defense and (2) 
that Kapusnik was too drunk 
to have intended to commit 
the stabbings. Kapusnik will 
be sentenced October 5. 

Wiser told Kern in open 
court that the ruling could not 
be appealed. According to the 
Supreme Court, granting a de- 
murrer is like granting a 'not 
guilty' verdict which, by law 
(double jeopardy), can't be 
appealed by the D.A. But, ac- 
cording to one legal expert in- 
terviewed by the Oil City Der- 
rick, there may be some room 
for debate on this issue. 

Wiser's ruling in the Kapus- 
nik case triggered the creation 
of a concerned citizens group 
which has filed three formal 
complaints to the state's Judi- 
cial Inquiry and Review 
Board (JIRB). According to 
coordinator Karen Dupree, 
Clarion citizens have been 



concerned about Wiser's 
conduct for some time. The 
goal of Concerned Citizens for 
Clarion County Justice is to 
have Wiser removed from the 
bench. 

The citizens group is also 
looking into last spring's oper- 
ational review report of Clar- 
ion County Court by the 
Administrative Office of 
Pennsylvania Courts (AOPC). 
"We have an awful lot of ques- 
tions about their findings," 
said Dupree. Staff members 
were sent in late May by Chief 
Justice Robert N.C. Nix Jr. of 
the state Supreme Court to in- 
vestigate Wiser's handling of 
Qarion County Court. Results 
of this investigation were 
available to the public in July. 

According to the report, 
"The study. . .found no exam- 
ples of misconduct in the ad- 
ministration of justice. How- 
ever, areas were discovered 
where administrative im- 
provements could be made." 

More is expected from the 
JIRB said Dupree. Investiga- 
tions by the JIRB are confi- 
dential, so it would be unlikely 
for the board to comment pub- 
licly on Wiser even if a full in- 
vestigation of his court were 
conducted. 

There are two processes by 
which a county judge can be 

(See Wiser. . .Page4> 



■ap" 



Class of 1991 Welcomed 

News — Page 5 



Frank Bums at CUP 

Features — Page 9 



Tennis rackets swing 
Sports — Page 15 



Weekiy Cfosswoi d Puzzle 
Features — Page 10 



WELCOME BACK 




student Enrollment Up At CUP 




by Liz Koones, 

News Editor 

Increases in revenue and 
student enrollment for the 
1987-88 school year highlighted 
President Bond's faculty wel- 
come address. The Presi- 
dent's Sept. 2 address was at- 
tended by a large number of 
old and new faculty. 

Bond announced that enroll- 
ment is up this year. As of that 
day, 6,190 students were en- 
rolled either full- or part-time 
at the university. F'ull-time en- 
rollment at Venango campus 
has also increased. He attri- 



buted the increase to the lower 
credit/hour cost that Clarion 
offers in comparison to other 
universities. 

Due to the increase in en- 
rollment, the university has 
received $1.8 million in new 
revenue to work with. Bond 
also stated that faculty and 
staff salaries have increased 
8.5 percent and that employee 
benefits are up 13.4 percent. 

At the conclusion of Presi- 
dent Bond's address, Mr. Wil- 
liam Fulmer, Clarion Univer- 
sity President of APSCUF 
(Association of Pennsylvania 



State College and University 
Faculties), spoke about the 
tentative three-year contract 
proposed by the state. The 
pact includes salary increases 
for faculty of five and one half 
percent in the first year, five 
percent in the second and five 
and one half in the third. "We 
got all there was to get," said 
Fulmer. "Personally, I'm not 
quite sure that we did." 

All faculty who have served 
eight years or more will re- 
ceive a five percent raise over 
the three years, which is a 7.3 
percent increase. Faculty who 




President Thomas A. Bond 



have served four to seven 
years will also be given a five 
percent raise. The Health and 
Welfare fund will also receive 
a 10' increase over three 
years. 

"Most of you will do better," 
Fulmer told the audience. 
"We didn't give away any- 
thing. We're getting tougher 
and I think we should be." 

The new contract must be 
ratified by the faculty. A gen- 
eral meeting will be held be- 
fore the actual voting. The 
voting is te itativeiy scheduled 
for the end of September. 




Thursday, September 10, 1987 



« 



CALL 



non 



^nLuEZlULj of £p£/2A2li//( 



uanta 



D.A. awaiting word on appeal 



by Deborah M. Schofield, 
Editor in Chief 



Qarion County District At- 
torney William Kern is 
awaiting word from the Penn- 
sylvania Superior Court after 
filing for appeal in the Kapus- 
nik case June 16. 



Judge Merle E. Wiser dis- 
missed homicide and aggra- 
vated assault charges against 
Michael Kapusnik, 23, May 18 
after halting the trial before 
the defense began its presen- 
tation. 

Wiser granted the defense's 
request for a demurrer saying 



that Kern had failed to dis- 
prove two possible defenses to 
the crime. According to 
Wiser, "A demurrer is proper- 
ly granted only if the prosecu- 
tion's evidence. . .is insuffi- 
cient to support a jury's find- 
ings that the defendant was 
guilty without a reasonable 




HIGH BOOK PRICES are only one of the predicaments students like Brian Johnson face upon returning to CUP. 

Photo by Mike Bordo. Photography Editor 



doubt. 

Kapusnik, a former CUP 
student from Natrona 
Heights, was accused of stab- 
bing two CUP students last 
November 16 outside a Main 
Street pizza parlor when they 
interrupted a fight between 
Kapusnik and his girlfriend. 
One student died. The former 
U.S. Marine pleaded guilty to 
one count of simple assault. 

Wiser ruled that Kern failed 
to disprove: (1) that Kapusnik 
acted in self-defense and (2) 
that Kapusnik was too drunk 
to have intended to commit 
the stabbings. Kapusnik will 
be sentenced October 5. 

Wiser told Kern in open 
court that the ruling could not 
be appealed. According to the 
Supreme Court, granting a de- 
murrer is like granting a 'not 
guilty' verdict which, by law 
(double jeopardy), can't be 
appealed by the D.A. But, ac- 
cording to one legal expert in- 
terviewed by the Oil City Der- 
rick, there may be some room 
for debate on this issue. 

Wiser's ruling in the Kapus- 
nik case triggered the creation 
of a concerned citizens group 
which has filed three formal 
complaints to the state's Judi- 
cial Inquiry and Review- 
Board (JIRB). According to 
coordinator Karen Dupree, 
Clarion citizens have been 



concerned about Wiser's 
conduct for some time. The 
goal of Concerned Citizens for 
Clarion County Justice is to 
have Wiser removed from the 
bench. 

The citizens group is also 
looking into last spring's oper- 
ational review report of Clar- 
ion County Court by the 
Administrative Office of 
Pennsylvania Courts ( AOPC). 
"We have an awful lot of ques- 
tions about their findings," 
said Dupree. Staff members 
were sent in late May by Chief 
Justice Robert N.C. Nix Jr. of 
the state Supreme Court to in- 
vestigate Wiser's handling of 
Clarion County Court. Results 
of this investigation were 
available to the public in July. 

According to the report, 
"The study. . .found no exam- 
ples of misconduct in the ad- 
ministration of justice. How- 
ever, areas were discovered 
where administrative im- 
provements could be made." 

More is expected from the 
JIRB said Dupree. Investiga- 
tions by the JIRB are confi- 
dential, so it would be unlikely 
for the board to comment pub- 
licly on Wiser even if a full in- 
vestigation of his court were 
conducted. 

There are two processes by 
which a county judge caa be 

(SpeWiSPr . Page 4< 




Frank Burns at CUP 

Features — Page 9 



Tennis rackets swing 

Sports — Page 15 



Weekly Crossword Puzzle 

Feaiurc-s — Page 10 



2-THE CLARiaN CALL. Clarion. PA. Thursday. Sept. 10. 1987 



THE CLARION CALL, Clarion, PA. Thursday, Sept. 10, 1987-3 




Back to the Future 

So often we as humans students and mngs in a climb- 
ing social world . . . .become mixed up in life's blundering jDace only to 
find our paths become dusty and narrow. Our world today is full of 
'yuppies' panting to get ahead, corporations fighting for that dollar, 
and the media grinding out stories on economy and death. I often en- 
counter this mindset within the newspaper business — the callous re- 
sponse to what often becomes a mechanical society. Even at Clarion 
University, students find themselves so wrapped up in career goals, 




classes, and parties, that we fail to recognize the other side to life. . . 
the human side. 

Who is that old man downtown who leans crookedly againsi 
walls and benches, and why is his face so weathered? Who is behind 
the broad laughing smile of that loud co-worker, and when does she 
frown? Who gave that piece of clay life in the art gallery and what do 
they see in it? So many people exist, thrive, and interact with us, yet 

(See Life Pane 4) 



(ii^The Clarion Call 

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j^ ^ Clarion, Pennsylvania 16214 

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Copy Editors TO BE ANNOUNCED 



The Clarion Call is published every Thursday during the school year in accordance with the school 
calendar. Editors accept contributions to their sections trom any source, but reserve the right to edit 
all copy for libel, taste, style and length. 

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HIDE PA 




Change 



by Art Barlow 
Head Grounds keeper 

Welcome Bacli! 

Another new year begins for all of 
us at Clarion University, and for 
Hide Parle it marks the start of a 
fourth season of wit and witticism, 
thought and reason, songs from the 
heart and hopes for the season. By 
now there have been around 70 
'speakers' in our little Park; yet 
there are more to be heard. It al- 
ways pleases me to see such diver- 
sity. 

However, as such new season be- 
gins I find myself covering the same 
ground in the September column: 
what starts in green will end in the 
hard white crust of winter white; a 
new season, another turn; the fact 
that there are fiscal years and cal- 
endar years and school years, and 
for those of the academic persuasion 
the year ends with summer. The 
first day of class is our New Year's 
Day. I have invariably addressed 
that sense of an end and a beginning 
that marks the beginning of the 
'School Year.' 

So this year as I naturally turned 
to this equating of the seasons and 
our endeavors it seemed appro- 
priate to probe a little deeper and 
look for a connecting concept. 

Sure, 'summer ends now' is some- 
thing everyone shares, but for most 
people their lives are not altered by 
the coming of autumn. There is the 
long Labor Day weekend and then 
back to the working world; there is 
the interruption, but no radical 
change. 

But change is the constant in the 
world of academe. All of the return- 
ing students are engaging in this 
change; place, activities, working 
habits and style. For the faculty the 
autumn marks a return from study, 
travel or maybe a period of leisure. 
The semester begins with a Convo- 
cation, hearty greetings and some 
fresh stories, and then in a relatively 
brief period of time an adaption to 

Norm's Dorm 



new hours, new classes, new faces, 
new equipment, new places and 
tasks. 

For the Freshmen there is the 
shock of the change, the first full 
flush of freedom, the potential for 
tension and distress. The institution, 
aware of this, provides special help 
and instruction as students struggle 
to adapt. 

We all get good at facilitating these 
yearly transitions. So much so, in 
fact, that eventually change be- 
comes the norm; it loses its sting, 
and we learn more and more of the 
techniques of adaptation. Finally, it 
becomes so ingrained that we cease 
thinking about it consciously. 

This change that continually takes 
place in the academic environment 
is one of our marks of distinction. We 
require it ; we teach it ; it is one of the 
most valuable lessons accompany- 
ing the educational process. No one 
who seriously begins a college ca- 
reer expects to be the 'same' person 
when they graduate; they expect 
they will acquire new knowledge, 
that they will engage in personal 
growth and self-fulfillment. 

But change is not necessarily 
something which everyone 
embraces; it is not a norm, and not 
everyone likes it. 

In fact, I can think of a number of 
incidents where people I have known 
have gone to great lengths to avoid 
change. Yet, the students I talk with 
consistently accept the fact of 
change as part of their career goals. 
Very few insist on returning to their 
town of origin to begin their careers. 
They are mobile either because it 
comes with the territory or t>ecause 
the chance for change, travel, some 
adventure, draws them along. 

I must admit I belong to the latter 
party. As a high school student I can 
rememljer bagging groceries at a 
local supermarket and facing the 
prospects of a quick move up to 
frozen foods as soon as graduation 
passed, and I could work full time. It 



would be pretty chilly in there with 
the broccoli and cauliflower, but it 
would also be pretty secure for an 18- 
year-old. I even knew a fellow who, 
only two years out, was already into 
toys. It was comfortable, but it was 
just too neat, too predictable. The 
world had to offer a little more than 
30 years on the job and a company 
watch. 

I also had a very strong inclination 
to wonder just what life was like 
outside the lower Hudson Valley. So, 
I drove to Newburgh and enlisted in 
the USAF; plenty of change there: 
winter in Texas, a long, cold spring 
in Illinois, finally a chance to choose 
a duty location and I put in for Wash- 
ington State, which I got. 

Who knows if it all worked out for 
the best, at least I followed my nat- 
ural inclinations. But I often think 

back on Len T He was a bit of a 

mystery figure, only in the barracks 
when he had duty, quiet, seemingly 
a loner and totally self-sufficient. 
Soft-spoken, he never even tried to 
fit into one of the sub-groups that 
made up the outfit. One evening we 
encountered Len leaving the bar- 
racks with a bowling bag in his right 
hand; he was even wearing a league 
shirt. As it turned out it was just the 
weekly game up in Everett. Len was 
a local boy, "smarter to enlist than 
wait for the draft," and when he had 
a chance to select a duty station he 
took the one closest to home; week- 
end dinners, a steady girl from the 
home high school, and a solid pro- 
mise to get full time at the pulp and 
paper mill after the hitch was up. 
The Air Force which had been my 
ticket out was just a tolerable diver- 
sion for Len. He made it fit into his 
plans. Len liked the glimpse of life 
he had had, and he worked quietly 
and cleverly to insure that there was 
a minimal amount of change coming 
his way. I admit we haven't kept in 
touch, but when his four years of 
duty ended, I am quite certain he 

(SeeParl<. . .Page 4) 
















in^H/i£N 



\ 






Norm's Dorm 



GeE/3iU- 






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Classifieds 



BUY OR SELL AVON for Christmas 
or anytime. Call 764-3464. 

WILL EXCHANGE ROOM/board 

for help at boarding home. Con- 
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STEREO INSTALLATION: Cars, 
Vans, Trucks, R.V.'s, etc. Mobile 
service available, all components, 
equilizers, speakers, etc. Get a 



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ART STUDENT WANTED to teach 
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4-THE CLARION CALL, Clarion. PA. Thursday, Sept. 10, 1987 



Wiser... 



removed from office. One, dis- 
ciplinary action could be 
taken by the JIRB if the board 
saw necessary after an inves- 
tigation. Such actions could in- 
clude admonishing the judge, 
suspending him from the 
bench, removing him from the 
bench, or ordering his re- 
tirement. Two, impeachment 
action could be introduced and 
passed in the House, then the 
trial would take place in the 
Senate. 

The Concerned Citizens 
group has gathered some 2,500 



(Continued from Page 1) 

signatures for Wiser's im- 
peachment. 

A fourth complaint is pres- 
ently being prepared by the 
Concerned Citizens group in 
response to a decision Wiser 
made in a sexual abuse case 
last month. In this instance, 
Wiser granted a demurrer, re- 
versed it, and then reversed 
that decision. "It further 
brings to light this fight be- 
tween Kern and Wiser," said 
Dupree. 

Concerned Citizens is pres- 
ently in the process of pushing 




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To apply, stop in your local Domino's 
Pizza store today or call 226-4060. 



©1986 Domino's Pizza, Inc. 




Ideas and thoughts 
are accepted and en- 
couraged as letters 
to the editor. AU con- 
tributions should be 
made to the Clarion 
Call office. 1 Harvev 
Hall 




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for the passage of Senate Bill 
which would provide for 
changes relating to judicial 
discipline through the creation 
of a Judicial U)nduct Board 
and an Attorney Disciplinary 
Board. According to Dupree, 
"We feel had some of these 
measures been in effect, we 
wouldn't be having the prob- 
lems we are having now. " The 
group is also planning to in- 
volve political leaders next, 
and strive for national focus in 
an awareness campaign of 
changes that need to be made 
in the judicial system. Dupree 
reflected the feelings of the 
group saying, "Judges have 
set themselves up to be a sort 
of a god." 

Dupree was personally an- 
gered by the Kapusnik deci- 
sion. "I don't think that ever 
would have happened had that 
been Wiser's son." Dupree 
feels the ruling was totally out 
of the question. 

Park. . . . 

(Continued from Page 2) 

went back to the place on the line 
that had been kept for him, and the 
bowling team, well, he never did 
miss too many of the games. 

I used to be pretty hard on Len and 
his like. I criticized their ambition, 
their needs. I have of late, however, 
mellowed in character and dropped 
my voice; they are, after all, the 
stolid citizens who provide stability; 
they are the substance of civiliza- 
tion. 

The rest of us — we're off chasing 
butterflies, bounding through the 
fields of summer, head up lunging 
through the high grass, left foot com- 
ing down into the same old wood- 
chuck hole. 

I still remember th» Monarchs 
and Tiger Swallowtails that abound- 
ed on the Shawangunk. It was the 
stream of my youth, and it ran right 
through the lowlands, the rich 
farms, of the lower Hudson Valley. I 
often think back to those places with 
reverie. 

—Mr. A. Barlow is a member of 
the Communication Department and 
the self-appointed groundskeeper of 
Hide Park. 

COPIER MACHINES 

In addition to the five machines in 
the Library, there is another coin- 
operated machine in Riemer which 
can reduce items up to 11x17 - to 
normal size. 




by Liz Koones, 
News Editor 



At their May 1987 graduation, 
Yale University students protest- 
ed the university's ties to com- 
panies conducting business in 
South Africa. Students demanded 
that the university divest from 
these companies because of the 
racist apartheid policy in South 
Africa. One student received his 
diploma wearing a gown with the 
word "divest" emblazoned on it. 

The April 1987 demonstrations 
against CIA recruitment at the 
University of Massachusetts, led 
to the arrests of 15 people, in- 
cluding Abbie Hoffman and Amy 
Carter. Those arrested went to 
trial and were acquitted. Juror 
Anne Gaffney, 6.4, said after the 
trial, "These young people are 
doing what most of us should be 
doing." 

At campuses all over the coun- 
try, students are banding togeth- 



er and taking a stand on issues. 
Issues they feel strongly about. 

This brings to mind the upris- 
ings that took place on campuses 
two decades ago. 

What has been reborn is the 
realization that students still 
have a voice. It is a very strong 
voice, that when utilized properly 
can bring about change. 

Clarion University has a voice. 
One that is over 6,000 members 
strong. And this voice can also 
bring about change, if it can be 
hears. Right now, it is a very 
quiet voice. 

Clarion University students 
need to take some initiative. It 
takes time, but the student voice 
can be heard. If you or anyone els 
feels strongly about a certain 
issue, let someone know about it. 
Talk to a student senator, write a 
letter to the editor, start a peti- 
tion; do whatever it takes. But let 
your voice be heard. 



LIT6b ■ ■ ■(Continued from Page 2) 
do we really know them? And on a larger scale, can we empathize 
with the families of MIA's, feel the sting of Harlem poverty, or share 
the triumph of a gold metalist in the Olympic games? And even furth: 
er, on a lighter note, when was the last time we sang in the shower or 
swam on a private beach naked? 

I guess the beginning of the school year, combined with the onset 
of fall, reminds me of how dull life can become. Stress and strain 
demand of us every day, and could be our ultimate end if this is our 
only means. 

Aside from this kind of life, the Vat race,' there's a more human 
side. Aside from the news world's rising Wall Street, union strikes, 
and Contra aid, there's a mc«-e human side. Aside from classes and 
parties, there's a more human side. 

I consciously began a mindset when I first conceived 'Aside from 
Life', and I decided it would be here that I could air my ideas, not 
about heavy world issues, but about life itself. We have come back to 
Claricn — back to the future. . .because we arc the future. We are to- 
morrow's leaders, professionals, and decision makers, and unless we 
stop once in a while to 'smell the roses', we'll lose our potential as a 
sensitive society. As one young man once stressed, "I said it before 
and m say it again. Life moves pretty fast, and if you don't stop to 
look around once in a while. . .you'll miss it." 

Welcome and welcome back. Thumbs up for a great year! 

—Deborah M. Schofield 

SHARE THE WORD 

... TO UNDERSTAND GOD'S WORD 

SHARE THE WORD 

... TO ENRICH YOUR FAITH 

SHARE THE WORD 

... TO SHARE WITH OTHERS 

TUESDAYS, 4^, Beginning SEPT. 15, 140 Pierce 



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NEWS 




Classof1991givenencouragement 



by Andrea Yuhasz, 
News Staff Writer 



Members of the class of 1991 
and parents filled the Mar- 
wick-Boyd Auditorium to near 
capacity on September 3, 1987 
for the Freshmen Convoca- 
tion. 

Applause filled the auditor- 
ium as Clarion University 
faculty and administration 
took the stage. Dr. Robert Ed- 
ington, Provost and Academic 



Vice President, opened the 
ceremony by encouraging the 
freshmen to be * 'Clarion 
Proud" and introducing the 
other speakers. 

President Dr. Thomas Bond 
took the podium and said, "We 
all have fun here, and this is a 
fun place. But we also work 
hard here." The purpose of 
convocation, according to 
Bond, is to make freshman 
aware of the academic side of 
college. Bond also told the 



audience they "have selected 
the right college for now, and 
in the future." 

Kent O'Neil, President of 
Student Government and one 
of only three students to serve 
on the Board of State Gover- 
nors, encouraged other stu- 
dents to take advantage of as 
many opportunities as they 
can while they have the 
chance. 



Dean of Arts and Sciences, 
Dr. James Scanlon, represent- 
ed the faculty when he encour- 
aged students to better them- 
selves as individuals and bet- 
ter their society. 

Returning from Penn State 
University, where he is com- 
pleting his Doctorate degree, 
William Lloyd representend the 
faculty of Clarion University. 
Lloyd delighted the audience 



with stories from his own col- 
lege days. Happy to be back at 
Clarion and teaching, Lloyd 
told students to become well- 
rounded and look for what 
they will get out of a course, 
not what they have to put into 
it. 

In closing. Dr. Edington ex- 
pressed his wish that he will 
see all freshmen again in 1991 
at Commencement. 



Tutoring Center 
moves to Davis 



by Liz Koones, 
News Editor 



Student Development Ser- 
vices, which has taken up new 
residence on the second floor 
of Davis Hall, offers a wide 
range of services to Clarion 
University students. Study 
groups, walk-in tutoring and a 
learning skills lab are some of 
the many programs offered 
by Student Development. 

"We are here for the gen- 
eral student body," said direc- 
tor Lou Tripodi. "It is import- 
ant that they (students) know 
where we are." Tripodi said 
the move from Egbert Hall to 
Davis Hall has given them 
more space, resources and 
staff to work with. 

The program offers tutoring 
services by appointment to all 
students in any area of study. 
There are 33 peer workers 
available to tutor. Also offered 
is walk-in tutoring for math 



and accounting from 6-8, Mon- 
day through Thursday. Both 
tutorial services can be found 
in Room 209. 

In addition, there is a learn- 
ing skills lab, in Room 204, 
where students can improve 
notetaking skills and oasic 
study and reading skills. "In 
the learning skills lab we work 
to make students independent 
learners," said Tripodi. 
"We're trying to emphasize 
the preventive approach." He 
said if students acquire better 
learning and study habits 
through the learning skills lab, 
then they won't need to use the 
tutoring services. 

Student Development Ser- 
vices also offers study skills 
workshops, outreach work- 
shops to campus organiza- 
tions, and GS 100 classes. Ap- 
proximately 2,500 students 
utilize its services annually. 
For help or information call 
226-1888. 




ALL EARS Freshmen listen intently to President Bond's opening address at Frestiman Convocation. 

Photo by Peter B. McMHIen, Staff Photographer 

Freshmen join Honors Program 



TTiree additional incoming 
freshmen at Clarion Univer- 
sity of Pennsylvania have 
joined the Honors Program. 
Thirty-one freshmen are now 
participating in the second 
year of this program. 

The Honors Program pro- 
vides special opportunities for 



College costs up this year 



WASHINGTON, D.C. (CPS) 
—Students, Parents, state leg- 
islatures and the federal gov- 
ernment will spend $124 billion 
on higher education this year, 
or $14,294 for each full-time 
student, the U.S. Department 
of Education calculates. 

In its annual back-to-school 
forecast, the department — in 
recent years a severe critic of 
college spending — also noted 
this year's higher education 
costs represent a 7 percent 
jump since 1986-87. 

Announcing the forecast 
last week, Secretary of Edu- 
cation William Bennett ar- 
gued the expense of higher ed 
does not justify the return. 

"The American people have 
made a tremendous financial 
commitment to education," 
Bennett said of the record $308 



billion the nation will spend on 
all levels of education this 
year. "We know what makes 
for a good education. The gen- 
erous investment is there. It's 
time we started getting a 
much better return on that in- 
vestment." 

Bennett's numbers, how- 
ever, contradict another re- 
port released last week by Re- 
search Associates of Washing- 
ton, a private research group 
that studies higher public edu- 
cation. 

According to Research As- 
sociates head Kent Halstead, 
it costs public colleges and 
universities only 4 percent 
more than last year to educate 
its students, an increase "sim- 
ilar to that of many indus- 
tries." 

Halstead concluded public 
campuses "remain as produc- 
tive as other sectors" of the 



economy. 

He compliments campus of- 
ficials for keeping costs down 
even while state and local gov- 
ernments allocated "a ser- 
iously declining share of their 
tax revenue budgets to public 
higher education — 8.1 per- 
cent in 1986-87 compared to 
the recent peak of 9.2 percent 
in 1980-81." 

Education costs per student 
doubled in the last nine years, 
from $2,554 in 1977-78 to $5,035 
in 1986-87, while tuition during 
the 1986-87 school year rose 
just 4.4 percent, the lowest 
increase in tuition revenues in 
a decade, Halstead reported. 

Both the Education Dept. 
report and the Research Asso- 
ciates study state that college 
enrollments, despite a shrink- 
ing pool of 18-to-24-year-olds, 
have remained steady. 



high achieving students. They 
will enroll in specially design- 
ed interdisciplinary courses 
which fulfill credits required 
for graduation. They interact 
closely with faculty and re- 
ceive personal attention for 
their special needs. 

Designed to promote close 
contact with faculty, the Hon- 
ors Program promotes devel- 
opment of skills in communi- 
cation, analysis, criticism, re- 
search, creativity, global con- 



sciousness, career prepara- 
tion, personal values, and 
community service. 

The newest members of the 
program are: Kimberly M. 
Bush, Tammy Sue Pears, and 
Edward J. Seergae. 

The 21-credit Honors core 
program is distributed over 
four years of study. During 
the first two years, one Honors 
course per semester is taken, 
covering language skills, hu- 

(See Honors. . .Page?) 



Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 



Sept. 
Sept. 



10: 
13: 
14: 



15: 



12: 



Sept. 13: 



Sept. 
Sept. 



15: 
16: 



CAMPUS CALENDAR 

ACADEMIC & INFORMATIONAL 

Open House: Learning Skills Lab. - 2nd floor Davis, 1-4 p.nn. 
Activities Day - Organizational Extiibits (around Harvey) 1-4 p.m. 
Credit/No Record begins (Registrars Office, 122 Carrier) 10 a.m. 
Class Withdrawals begin (Registrar's Office) 10 a.m. 
Faculty Senate Meeting (140 Peirce) 4 p.m. 
Athletic Dept. "Time Out" Luncheon (Holiday Inn) 12 noon 
ENTERTAINMENT 

Parents Day 

Theatre Performance (Little Theatre) 

Planetarium Show (10:30 a.m. to 12 noon) 

CAB'S (outside or in Harvey) 9:30 p.m. 

Activities Day 

C.B. Mini Concert featuring "10 til Destiny" (behind Stevens) 

Hot Air Balloon Rides (Ralston Field) 2-4 p.m. 

C.B. Movie "Outrageous Fortune", (M.B. Aud.) 8 p.m. 

German Club presents "IHNA German Folkdancers" (M.B. Aud.) 

8:15 p.m. 
C.B. presents Larry Linville from M*A*S*H. (M.B. Aud.)8:i5 p.m. 



6-THE CLARION CALL, Clarion, PA, Thursday, Sept. 10, 1987 



'87 grads fare well in job market 



(CPS) ~ Spring, 1987, grads 
didn't fare as badly in the job 
market as the experts had 
predicted, the College Place- 
ment Council (CPC) reports. 

In its annual review of how 
well students did in getting 
jobs, the council ~ a nation- 
wide association of campus 
placement officers — said a 
late spring flurry of compan- 
ies recruiting on campus help- 
ed salvage what had been a 
"slow" recruiting year at the 
nation's campuses. 

While companies always 
visit more during the spring, 
said the CPC's Dawn Gulick, 
"We were surprised at how it 
picked up." 

Gulick said many compan- 



ies, particularly those in slug- 
gish industries such as oil, 
were hesitant to kick off ag- 
gressive recruiting campaigns 
earlier in the academic year. 
Those companies took a hard- 
er look at their hiring needs 
before extending offers to 
graduating students, she said. 

Many companies, unstable 
due to corporate mergers or 
budget cuts, also waited be- 
fore recruiting, she said. 

Other companies visited 
campuses early in the year, 
but later decided to hire more 
people during the spring, often 
maKing better salary offers. 

The late boom wasn't uni- 
versal, however. 

The CPC's survey of its 



member schools found techni- percent, to $30,816. 
cal, engineering, computer Mechanical engineers re- 
science and accounting ma- ceived 31 percent fewer job of- 
jors suffered a tighter job fers compared to last year, 
market than liberal arts and jobs offered to electrical 
grads. engineers dropped 35 percent. 
Corporate offers to 1987 hu- Computer science graduates 
manities grads jumped by 29 were offered 28 percent fewer 
percent since last year, with jobs, 
starting salaries rising 5 per- "The year wound up being 
cent to an average $20,256. better for liberal arts," said 



Accounting graduates also 
enjoyed higher average salar- 
ies — up 2.5 percent since last 
year, up to $21,744 — but field- 
ed 16 percent fewer jobs. 

Petroleum engineering 
graduates got a resounding 82 



Jim Keene of the State Uni- 
versity of New York-Stony 
Brook. "It was not as good for 
engineering." 

Keene believes many com- 
panies are eschewing students 
with limited degrees for 



percent fewer job offers last "those who can think in gen- 
year, while their starting sal- eral terms." 
aries plummeted almost 7 While engineering and sci- 



Before you choose a long distance 
service, take a dose look 




You may be thinking about 
choosing one of the newer 
carriers over AT&T in order to 
save money. 

Think again. 

Since January 1987, AT&T's 
rates have dropped more than 
15% for direct-dialed out-of- 
state calls. So they're lower than 
you probably realize. For infor- 
mation on specific rates, you 
can call us at 1 800 222-0300. 

And AT&T offers clear long 
distance connections, operator 
assistance, 24-hour customer 
service, and immediate credit 
for wrong numbers. Plus, you 
can use AT&T to call from 
anywhere to anywhere, all over 
the United States and to over 
250 countries. 

You might be surprised at 
how good a value AT&T really 
is. So before you choose a 
long distance company, pick 
up the phone. 



ART 

The right choice. 



o 



ence majors at Slippery Rock 
University in Pennsylvania 
were in demand, placement 
counselor Sam Gagliardo add- 
ed, "During the last five 
years, the tendency has been 
that recruiters are going for 
liberal arts students." 

Technical field grads do 
fare better, he said, if they've 
got some English or history 
classes under their belts. 

"There's a slight breeze" to- 
wards hiring liberal arts grad- 
uates, he said, "but it's not a 
gale." Liberal arts students 
are usually offered "lower end 
jobs" in fields such as retail- 
ing and customer service. 

"It's not that there's this 
sudden burst of activity to- 
wards hiring liberal arts ma- 
jors," concurred Boyd Arm- 
strong of the University of 
Houston's placement office. 

"But liberal arts majors are 
more flexible, and thev're not 
already stereotyped by em- 
ployers." 

Bruce Johnston of Hum- 
boldt State College in Califor- 
nia claimed it's because hu- 
manities majors have lower 
job expectations than others, 
and are more willing to work 
outside their field of study. 

Others speculate liberal 
arts majors are doing better 
because companies are 
changing the way they re- 
cruit. 

Grades are no longer as im- 
portant as, say, "the total in- 
dividual, the student's activi- 
ties, if they worked their way 
through college, that kind of 
thing," maintained Laurie 
Ray of the University of 
Southern California's place- 
ment office. 




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THE CLARION CALL, Clarion, PA, Thursday, Sept. 10, 1987-7 



'\ 



Four receive 
scholarship awards 



Four students have been 
named 1987-88 Presidential 
Scholars at Clarion University 
of Pennsylvania. The $1,000 
awards are made annually to 
incoming freshmen and trans- 
fer students with two of the 
scholarships awarded to mi- 
nority students. 

Decisions about the recip- 
ients are made by a commit- 
tee of CUP deans and the di- 
rector of admissions with em- 
phasis placed on outstanding 
academic achievement, 



demonstrated leadership 
qualities and involvement in 
extra-curricular activities. 
Applicants must also com- 
plete an essay and submit 
three letters of recommenda- 
tion. Recipients are reviewed 
annually tor consideration of 
renewal of the award. 

Awards were given to Tracy 
Crisman, RD 3 Emlenton; Ja- 
son Haas, RD 1 Knox; Caro- 
line Nalepa, Clarion, and Re- 
becca Stange, RD 1 Strattan- 
vUle. 



Alumni scholarslilp 
applications available 



Ten $300 scholarships will 
be awarded this year to Clar- 
ion University of Pennsylva- 
nia students by the Clarion 
University Alumni Associa- 
tion. 

Students must have com 



A review of the applicants 
will center on both their stand- 
ing at the University and 
need. 

Two of the 10 scholarships 
will be presented to sons and 
daughters of alumni, with one 




pleted one year at Clarion aod parent of the student required 
are currently a full time stu- to have graduated from Clar- 
dent to be eligible for the ion. The remaining scholar- 
scholarship. Application ships do not have the same re- 
forms and further instructions quirement, but students who 
may be obtained at the Alum- have a graduate parent should 



ni House on Wood Street. 

The Alumni Association is a 
private organization for the 
support of Clarion University 
through the organization of 
special activities and publica- 



make special note on the 
make sp^ial note on the ap- 
plication material. 

The Alumni Association 
representative of 23,000 Clar- 
ion graduates sponsors a num- 



tions for Clarion graduates ber of special activities each 

and current students. year, including Homecoming 

Completed applications for in the fall and Alumni Week- 

the scholarships must be re- end in May. An alumni bulle- 

ceived at the Alumni House by tin is published for graduates 

Sept. 30, 1987. The Alumni As- four times a year and regional 

sociation Directors will make alumni meetings are sponsor- 

the final awards during its Oc- ed by the Alumni Association, 
tober board meeting. 

CHANDLER iVIENU 

THURSDAY, SEPT. 10 
LUNCH: Scotch Barley Soup, French Onion Soup, Fried Ham on Bun, Beeferoni, Chopped Broc- 
coli, Potato Chips, Macaroni. . „, . , .,u », J. ^ 
DINNER: Scotch Barley Soup, French Onion Soup, Roast Beef, Chicken with Noodles, Cream 
Style Corn, Home Style Noodles, Fordhook Lima Beans. 

FRIDAY, SEPT. U 
BREAKFAST: Grapefruit Half, Bacon and Cheese Omelette, Hard Boiled Eggs, Home Fried Po- 
tatoes Desert Peaches, French Toast with Syrup, Jelly Roll, Coffee Cake. 
LUNCH: Manhattan Style Clam Chowder, Cream of Spinach Soup, Cheeseburger on Bun, Fish 
Sandwich. Tater Gems, Baked Corn Pudding. .. . o cu j 

DINNER: Manhattan Style Clam Chowder, Cream of Spinach Soup, Tacos (Meat Sauce, Shred- 
ded Cheese, Chopped Tomatoes, Onions and Lettuce), Grilled Hot Dog on Bun, Chicken Nuggets, 

Sauerkraut, French Fries. 

SATURDAY, SEPT. 12 
BREAKFAST: Fried Eggs (Sunnyside or Over), Bacon, Hot Oatmeal, Apricot Sweet Roll, Hot 
Cakes with Syrup, Fried Ham, Hash Brown Potatoes, _, . ^ ^ .„ j ,^ 

LUNCH: Chicken Noodle Soup, Cream of Tomato Soup, Barbecue Rib Sandwich, Grilled Cheese 
Sandwich, Potato Chips, Whole Leaf Spinach , ^ ... „ ■ j », .i t 

DINNER: Chicken Noodle Soup, Cream of Tomato Soup, Breaded Veal Cutlet, Baked Meat Loaf 
with Gravy, Buttered Frozen Peas, Whipped Potatoes, Buttered Wax Beans. 




GETTING A FACELIFT: The scaffolding surrounding Founders Hall symbolizes a small part of the major reconstruction 
project planned for the hall. Photo by Mike Bordo. Photography Editor 

Construction begun on Founders 



by Deborah M. Schofield 
Editor-in-Chief 



Major construction begun 
on Founders Hall this past 
July is only the beginning of 
an entire facelift and recon- 
struction project still in the 
planning stages. 

The new roof atop Found- 
ers, costing $269,696, will be Gymnasium 



Qarion University had re- 
ceived an average of $172,000 
a year for the past three years 
in Deferred Maintenance 
Grants. 

CUP is planning several 
other projects under the De- 
ferred Maintenance program 
including roof, plumbing, and 
concrete repairs to Tippin 



completed sometime this 
spring, said Robert Crawford, 
assistant vice-president for 
administration. The project is 
sli^tly delayed due to mater- 
ial problems which con- 
tractors initially encountered. 
According to Crawford, the 
roof will last 60 years or long- 
er. 

Minor leaks and moisture 
penetration prompted the 
repair 



renovation in three or four 
years, says Crawford. A new 
heating, ventilating, and air- 
conditioning system will be in- 
stalled, along with exterior 
mortar repairs, painting, and 
general cleaning. "We're try- 
ing to maintain the original 
decore of the building," said 
Crawford. The governor's re- 
quest for these funds is in the 
state house awaiting approval. 



Founders is also scheduled 
for major interior and exterior 

rlOnOrSa m . (Continued from Page 5) 

manities, social sciences, nat- CUP Honors Program is a 

ural sciences, and mathe- member of the National Col- 

matics. This fills 15 of the 21 legiate Honors Council 

core credits with the balance (NCHC) placing it in contact 

chosen from regular univer- with honors programs nation- 

rr.„. wide. Student representatives 

will attend meetings of the 



sity offerings. 

The Junior Honors semester 

.^ is a thematic course offered in 

Money for the roof is part of the spring semester. It gives 

a Deferred Maintenance students an opportunity to 

Grant from the Pennsylvania draw on the skills and know- p - "Annlioants should 

legislature as part of a larger ledge gained durmg the first L'^f l^^^i^?^^^^^^^^ 

grant to the state system of two years. Senior honors s u- have a minimum total SAl 

higher education. The grant, dents will collaborate with '^'L ^^ ^Siie "Lnt ^a^^ 

which matches university pro- faculty in their major depart- \T^^^^^l fnhieh school 

funds dollar for doUar, ments to design_an individual I^fl^^^hlP,,;^^ ^l^^, ^^h^^^' 



NCHC. 

Students planning any four- 
year program of study at CUP 
may be eligible for the Honors 



ject — , ^ . 

provides state educational in- Senior Honors Project, to be 

stitutions with the opportunity carried out during the fall or 

to complete construction pro- spring semester, 
jects deferred because of a 
lack of university funds. 



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Once admitted to the pro- 
gram, students will be expect- 
ed to maintain a strong qual- 
ity point average. 

For more information on 
the CUP Honors Program, 
contact Catherine Joslyn, Di- 
rector of the Honors Program. 

1 



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8--THE CLARION CALL, Clarion, PA, Thursday. Sept. 10, 1987 



Four campuses await Pope's visit 



THE CLARION CALL, Clarion, PA, Thursday, Sept. 10, 1987—9 



CPS) — Amid fears of cam- 
pus gridlock, worries about 
how to get football sod to re- 
cover quickly and lingering 
questions about what to do 
with a $500,000 altar, four col- 
leges are getting ready to host 
John Paul II during the Pope's 
present visit to the United 
States. 

On his multi-city tour, the 
Catholic leader will drop by 
the University of South Caro- 
lina at Columbia, the Univer- 
sity of New Orleans, Xavier 
University of Arizona State 
University, in some cases for 
only a few hours. 

To students at the four 
campuses, the papal visit will 
mean canceled classes, 
changes in parking arrange- 
ments, new construction and, 
in one instance, eviction from 
their dorm rooms. 

To administrators, the visit 
means a lot of meetings and 
extra expenses. 

The University of New Or- 
leans, for one, has spent 
"about $100,000" on landscap- 
ing, estimated UNO's Bill Ra- 
cek, while Xavier, also in New 
Orleans, has been "cleaning 
up the place, sandblasting 
buildings and doing some 
landscaping," said spokes- 
man Richard Tucker. 

John Paul II will be at South 
Carolina for only about five 
hours, where he'll make two 
addresses and meet privately 
with non-Catholic religious 
leaders. 



use, City, state and arch- 
diocesean officials started 
planning for the five-hour visit 
six months ago. 

The objective, said Ann Hill, 
a use newsletter, was "to let 
the largest number of people 
see the Pope without causing 
major gridlock in all of South 
Carolina." 

Today, the day before the 
visit, students who^ live in 
dorms near the site of John 
Paul II's first campus speech 
will have to leave their rooms 
for two days. On the morning 
of the visit, the Secret Service 
will "sweep" nearby build- 
ings, and seal them until he 
leaves. 

Nevertheless, "the students 
and everyone on campus are 
excited and looking forward to 



the visit," Hill maintained. 

Similarly, the University of 
New Orleans — where John 
Paul II will visit Sept. 12 - 
will cancel classes and close 
its offices and library in anti- 
cipation of an influx of some 
30,000 visitors, Racek explain- 
ed. 

After the Pope and the visi- 
tors leave, however, UNO will 
still have a $500,000 altar the 
archdiocese is building for the 
occasion. 

"The university will have to 
decide what to do with it," 
Racek said of the structure, 
which encloses showers and 
parking for the "Popemobile," 
the pontiff's special limousine. 

Racek said it's possible the 
altar may become a dressing 
area for athletic events. 



It will take about a week to 
restore the grounds, Racek 
said. 

Xavier's Tucker said it's all 
worth it. "This visit has been a 
great opportunity for ex- 
posure, for getting some 
things done that needed to be 
done." 

A few students will be 
among the 4,500 people who 
hear John Paul II speak at 
Xavier, but most of the aud- 
ience will consist of members 
of the National Catholic Edu- 
cation Association and the As- 
sociation of Catholic Colleges 
and Universities. 

Both groups have criticized 
the Vatican in recent years for 
its proposals to bring Catholic 
campus courses under Oiurch 
control, a move many Ameri- 



can officials say would under- 
mine the value of degrees 
granted by U.S. Catholic col- 
leges. 

"Our only regret," Tucker 
said, "is that so few Xavier 
people will be able to attend, 
but we are not in control of the 
invitations. Xavier is only 
serving as host. If more 
tickets become available, 
more Xavier people will be 
able to be there." 

Tlie Pope's last campus ap- 
pearance will be at Arizona 
State, where he will celebrate 
Mass — oddly enough — in 
Sun Devil Stadium on 
Monday, Sept. 14. 

ASU will cancel classes on 
the 14th, but has not declared 
a campus holiday. 




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F E ATU R ES 




More music at WCUC 



by Denielle Gregg, 
Features Staff Writer 



Top 20 countdown, album 
premiers and Friday night 
sounds have all become a part 
of WCUC's new format. 

WCUC is a non-commercial 
radio station licensed to Clar- 
ion University. It broadcasts 
1000 watts and provides ser- 
vices for all of Clarion County. 
This semester there have been 
some changes at the station, 
these have been aimed at en- 
tertaining the county as well 
as the college. WCUC is 
changing people's minds who 
wouldn't listen to them before. 

The man responsible for 
some of these changes is Andy 
Mallison, the program direc- 
tor for WCUC. This semester 
he also accepted the position 
of station manager, this posi- 
tion is usually filled by a grad- 
uate student. He is the first un- 
dergraduate to take on this re- 
sponsibility. Andy is interest- 
ed in increasing the station's 
listening audience and main- 
taining the station's award- 
winning quality. 

The broadcasting day be- 
gins at 6 a.m. with Mutual 
News followed by Good Morn- 
ing Clarion. The day is filled 
with college, local and na- 
tional news updates. The in- 
creased news coverage isn't 
the only change enacted for 
this year. 



Fall sports season is close at 
hand and the sports director 
at WCUC is already preparing 
for play-by-play coverage of 
our Golden Eagle teams. Spe- 
cials on football, wrestling and 
basketball will remain as part 
of the line up this fall. Daily 
Sports Updates and a From 
the Sidelines talk show fea- 
turing Coach Sobolewski to 
review and preview the 
week's games will also be in- 
cluded in the sports section 
category. To complete the 
sports section, a weekend 
sports roundup will review se- 
ven days of events, from local 
high school, college and pro- 
fessional score results. This 
special edition airs Saturday 
and Sunday at 5:45. 

Last but not least in the 
evolution of WCUC is the 
music variety. Thanks to 
Kevin Beam, the music direc- 
tor, and his staff. Clarion will 
hear new sounds coming from 
the station. In an interview 
with Kevin he stated, "Musi- 
cally what we have been try- 
ing to do is bury the dinosaur 
we inherited and replace it 
with a more modem musical 
animal." This includes Jazz 
Qassics on Sundays, sounds of 
Solid Country, and a rock and 
roll oldies show. We can't for- 
get tfie Big Band showcase 
and our favorite sounds airing 
weeknights from 6-11 p.m. 
featuring the latest in rock 



Tuna raises money 



by Kellie Acquaro, 
Features Staff Writer 



Two Qarion University sen- 
iors are starring in the play 
"Greater Tuna' in order to 
raise scholarship funds for 
CUP theatre students. 

"Greater Tuna," written by 
Jaston Williams, Joe Sears 
and Ed Howard, is a comedy 
about the life in the third 
smaUest Texas town, called 
Tuna. TTie Director of TTieatre, 
the Director of College Read- 
ers and also the Director of 
"Greater Tuna," Dr. Mary 
Hardwick explained that the 
play is like, "having a good 
time, poking fun at different 
kinds of southern people, like 
watdimg Hee-Haw on TV." 

Ihe setting is that of a radio 
show. The uniqueness of this 
play is that the two actors in 
the play will be portra3dng 10 
different personalities. They 
each have a matter of 10 
seconds to change their 
clothes and become a totally 
different person. Playing 
these "tunite call-ins" will be 
Leo Glenn and Joel Walters. 
Glenn has been seen here at 



Qarion in such shows as "The 
Diviners," "Tobacco Road," 
"Fantastiks," "Fiddler on the 
Roof," and assumed the role 
of Pontius Pilate in "Jesus 
Christ Superstar." Walters, 
like Glenn, has also been seen 
in many Clarion Theatre pro- 
ductions: "The Diviners," 
"Tobacco Road," "Chicago," 
and "The Elephant Man." 

Both Glenn and Walters are 
training to become profes- 
sional actors. Dr. Hardwick 
hopes to enter "Greater 
Tuna" in the American Theat- 
re Association Festival. This 
is a competition against other 
plays and actors to win 
theatre scholarships. 

"Greater Tuna was paid 
for by Alpha Psi Omega and 
will run from September 17-19 
at the Sawmill in Cook Forest. 
Each show will be at 8 p.m. 
and admission will be ^.00. 
Tlie University production of 
"Gk-eater Tuna' will be per- 
formed in Marwick-Boyd Lit- 
tle Hieatre on October 13-17. 
Admission will be $4 for 
adults, $2 for childr^ and free 
to stud^ts with a valid I.D. 



music. WCUC is taking sounds 
from different music formats 
and creating a new one that is 
unique among area radio sta- 
tions. By changing and vary- 
ing their programs WCUC is 
reaching a new audience, one 
that wants to be informed in 
all areas: news, sports, and 
music. 

The most promising among 
aU the changes is the new per- 
sonality of WCUC. The people 
there are very receptive to 
their listening audience. The 
staff would like to encourage 
letters, phone calls, personal 
comments or any compli- 
ments that you may have. 
Kevin put this attitude into 
words when he said: "Every- 
thing we do isn't written in 
stone. We are flexible enough 
to adjust to what the audience 
wants. 

The number is 91.7 on your 
FM dial. The staff at WCUC 
encourages you to stop by 
Becker Hall and pick up a pro- 
gram guide to catch all your 
favorite programs. Be sure to 
tune in this fall for your favor- 
ite hits. 




ALL WRAPPED UP. . .Andy Mallison, the new station manager, will have his 
work cut out for him this year in handling the new format at WCUC. 

Photo by Mike Bordo, Photography Editor 



Major Burns to perform 



Larry Linville, most famous 
for the role of Maj. Frank 
Bums on the television series 
"M*A*S*H," will perform at 
Clarion University of Pennsyl- 
vania, Wednesday, Sept. 16, 
8:15 p.m., in Marwick-Boyd 
Auditorium. The appearance 
is sponsored by the CUP Cen- 
ter Board. 

Linville's program was 
nominated for "Best Lecture 
Topical Program" for the 1987 
NACA Campus Entertain- 
ment Awards. His lecture con- 
sists of a non-stop barrage of 
jokes and entertaining anec- 
dotes of what Linville calls, 
"A portrait. A portrait of me. 
The ridiculous story of how I 
became an actor." 

Bom in Ojai, Cal., LinviUe 
prew up and attended school 
in Sacramento. His interest in 
theatrical arts began in high 
school and his hilarious 
Christmas pageant production 
prompted the formation of a 
drama department at his high 
school. 

Linville graduated from the 
University of Colorado receiv- 
ing a degree in aeronautical 
engineering. His interest in 
the theatre tumed him toward 
the Royal Academy of Dra- 
matic Arts in London, Eng- 




LARRY LINVILLE 

land. An audition eamed him 
acceptance into the academy 
and a scholarship. 

Returning to the U.S. after 
two years, Linville performed 
for five years in classical 
repertory companies before 
premiering on Broadway in 
**More Stately Mansions," 
staring Ingred Bergman. Re- 
turning to California, he made 
several television guest-star 
appearances in: Judd for the 
Defense, Mannix, Mission 
Impossible, The F.B.I., and 
Bonanza. 



A guest star role on Room 
222 attracted producer Gene 
Reynolds, who was casting 
"M*A*S*H." LinviUe, consid- 
ered a dramatic actor, was an 
unlikely choice for the role of 
Frank Bums in the series, but 
he tumed it into a comedy 
classic. 

Since leaving "M*A*S*H," 
Linville has made more guest 
star television appearances 
and worked in several plays. 
He also played major roles in 
the short-lived TV series, 
"Grandpa Goes to 
Washington," "Checking In, 
and "Herbie the Love Bug." 

Linville has views about his 
program for college students. 
"I hope they get some com- 
mon sense advice about life 
and what it can do to you in its 
vagaries and its eccentrici- 
ties, and yes, there is life after 
college," he says. "It may not 
be the one you thought it 
would be, there are changes, 
you might even do something 
better than you imagined." 

Tickets for Linville's pro- 
gram are $3 for non-students. 
CUP students with validated 
identification cards will be ad- 
mitted free. 

(Story courtesy of the office of 
Public Affairs, CUP). 



THE CLARION CALL, Clarion, PA, Thursd ay, Sept. 10, 1987-11 



10— THE CLARION CALL, Clarion, PA, Thursday, Sept. 10, 1987 




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$5.99 ea. 



i.tj 



629 Wood St., Clarion 

OFFER EXPIRES: 9/16/87 



1987 Homecoming Court 
Applications 

• Now available In 108 Relmer • 

Return bySept. 18, 1987 
Must include photo — Max. size 5x7 




ACROSS 

1 Bespatter 

4 South American 

rodent 
8 Apollo's mother 

12 Southwestern 
Indian 

13 Periods of time 

14 Lamb's pen 
name 

15 A state: abbr. 
1b Small 

woodpecker 
18 Boundary 

20 Trial 

21 Latin 
conjunction 

22 Torrid 

23 Send forth 
27 Article of 

furniture 

29 Evergreen tree 

30 Pen 

31 Spanish article 



32 Decay 

33 Shallow vessel 

34 Printer's 
measure 

35 Flower 

37 Transfix 

38 Skill 

39 Strike 

40 Pitcher 

41 Attached to 

42 Urge on 
44 Musical 

instrument 
47 Clapped 

51 Guide's high 
note 

52 Great Lake 

53 Wild plum 

54 Cut off 

55 Drunkards 

56 Hardy heroine 

57 Diocese 

DOWN 

1 Twofold 



■The 

Weekly 

Crnsswnrd 

Puzzle 



2 Husband of 
Gudrun 

3 Emitted, as light 

4 Nuisance 

5 Macaw 



1 


2 


3 


1 


4 


5 


6 


7 


1 




9 


10 


11 


12 






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17" 








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1 


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"SS" 








TT 







6 One who 
captures 

7 Item of property 

8 Reading desk 

9 Antlered animal 

10 Cravat 

11 Paddle 
17 Pronoun 
19 Italy: abbr. 
22 Strike 

24 Roman 1001 

25 Roman road 

26 Temporary 
shelter 

27 Wagers 

28 Hebrew month 

29 Dude 

30 Pale 

32 Small waves 

33 Hog 

36 Note of scale 

37 Body of water 

38 Heavenly beings 

40 Combat on 
horseback 

41 Either 

43 Sun god 

44 Poems 

45 Century plant 

46 Back of neck 

47 Roman bronze 

48 In favor of 

49 Fruit seed 

50 Dawn goddess 



COILEGE PRESS SOVia 



SOLUTION ON PAGE 13 




/ 



I 



A.. 



A Contact Lens Deai 



For You! 



"v 



Mascot gets new look 

OLD 



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Soft ContacfsT?: 

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includes exam, follow-up care, 
Ireplacement plan. Insertion and 
■removal instructions and care kit. 

No Hidden Costs— You Pay $109.00 Complete 

Clarion Optical 

8 South 8th Ave. • Noxt to Slbway - 226-6121 

Call for Appt. • No Othor discounts apply ■ good thru Oct. 87 




by Maria Kapsak, 
Features Editor 



The Clarion University 
cheerleaders are breaking in 
their new mascot for the first 
home football game this Sat- 
urday. 

Under the new direction of 
Debbie Armengau, the squad 
looks forward to be even more 
enthusiastic than ever. Assist- 
ing them will be the mascot - 
this year with a whole new 
look. 



NEW 




Fake ID's cause penalties 



"One of my best friends got busted 
for it," said a Shippensburg Uni- 
versity student. 

"She thought she was really cool. 
She walked into the beer distributor 
and asked for a case of beer. He 
asked for her I.D. . .she received 
over $200 worth of fines. You play 
with fire, you get burned." 

According to some college stu- 
dents, the use of altered or fake 
I.D.'s is rempant on their campuses. 
"Many of them are unaware of the 
penalties," said one student. 

The underage drinker is part of an 
"entrepreneurial enterprise" when 
fake I.D.'s are involved, according 
to Millersville University Chief of 
Police, Wayne Silcox. Students are 
making and selling licenses without 
realizing the seriousness of the 
crime they are committing. Other 
students that carry or use an altered 
or fake license are likewise unaware 
of the penalties, according to Silcox. 

According to the Pennsylvania 
Department of Transportation's Li- 
cense Security Quality and Control 
Unit, more and more active prose- 
cution is occurring. "They are not 
only caught here by scanning license 
camera cards on our electronic opti- 
cal scanning equipment, they also 
get caught while attempting to dis- 
play or have their photo taken with 
an altered camera card," said Linda 
McKinne, Manager. "Some of them 
have gotten away with it in the past, 
but due to increased fraud aware- 
ness and training in detection that 
number is dwindling." 

"The LSQC Unit receives confis- 
cated licenses which have included 
altered birth dates, counterfeit li- 



censes, borrowed licenses, and al- 
tered camera cards," said McKinne. 
"When they are received the driv- 
er's license is immediately cancell- 
ed and the driver is prosecuted." 

A FRAUD LINE has been estab- 
lished by the LSQC, according to 
McKinne. "Students have the oppor- 
tunity to help deter fraud on our 
campuses." 

According to the Pennsylvania Ve- 
hicle Code, a person holding an al- 
tered driver's license, lending a dri- 
ver's license or using someone else's 
driver's license is guilty of a sum- 
mary offense. A person convicted is 
subject to a fine, assessment of three 
points on their driving record, and 
cancellation of their driver's license. 

"Many people who lend their li- 
cense or I.D. to another person don't 
realize they will suffer the same 
penalties as the person who uses it," 
said McKinne. 

"It's just amazing how innovative 
the students get," said Silcox. Stolen 
wallets are found with only a social 
security card or driver's license 
missing. A 20-year-old was prose- 
cuted for theft of several blank uni- 
versity student I.D.'s. The I.D.'s 
were made to match information on 
valid out-of-state licenses without 
photo. 

At Indiana University of Pennsyl- 
vania, four students were arrested, 
and one arrest is pending, according 
to Dr. Paul Lang, University Safety 
Director. The students counterfeited 
driver's licenses by hanging up a 
back drop on the dormitory wall. 
"We watch closely for fake I.D.'s be- 
cause we are very sensitive to the 
problem," said Lang. 



Director of Public Safety William 
Moiskie, Kutztown University, said, 
"The officers are very aware of fake 
I.D, use. They go over licenses very 
carefully." Mioske said the univer- 
sity has a summer and fall orien- 
tation program that warns students 
of the penalties associated with fake 
I.D.'s. Students caught are arrested 
in accordance with the Pennsylva- 
nia Vehicle Code. The I.D. is confis- 
cated and the student is subject to an 
in-house judicial system at the Uni- 
versity. 

"I believe Millersville, Indiana, 
and Kutztown were the three schools 
in the state system to effectively 
shut down a fake I.D. operation," 
said Silcox. According to Silcox, 
"fake I.D.'s were cut up, burned 
and, flushed," by students when a 
student was convicted on four counts 
of counterfeiting I.D.'s. The penalty 
was a $600 fine, two year probation, 
and 50 hours of community service. 
"He was put on a road crew picking 
•ip trash." 

"It's a way to make people popu- 
lar," said Silcox of students who 
make fake I.D.'s. "The wrong way 
to become popular. People get to 
know you on a first name basis, but 
as more people know about you the 
worse it l)ecomes, however clandes- 
tine." This kind of popularity gets 
you caught. 







oc/s 



NO BARS. . .College students resort to private parties because of penalties 
involving fake ID'S. 

Photo by Chuck Lizza, Staff Photographer 




prwE 
DftACory 




Luncheon Specials 

Served until 5:00 p.m. 

Served witti 

egg drop soup, egg roll, fried rice. 

1. Sweet & Sour Pork $2.95 

2. Pork Chow Mein 2.95 

3. Pork Lo Mein 3.25 

4. Green Pepper Steak 3.50 

5. Beef with Oyster Sauce 3.50 

6 Beef with Broccoli 3.50 

7 Beef Chow Mein 2.95 

8 Beef Lo Mein 3.25 

9 Shrimp Chow Mein 3.25 

0. Shrimp Lo Mein 3.50 

1. Sweet & Sour Shrimp 3.75 

2. Shrimp with Assorted Vegetables 3.75 

3. Sweet & Sour Chicken 2.95 

4. Chicken Chow Mein 2.95 

5. Curry Chicken 2.95 

6. Kun Pao Chicken 2.95 

7. Almond Chicken Ding 2.95 

8. Moo Goo Gal Pan 3.95 

9. Chicken Lo Mein 3.25 

20. Dragon Chow Mein or Lo Mein (chicken, pork, shrimp & beef) 4.50 



n 

■n 
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Sun. - Tliur. 
11A.IM.-9P.M. 

Fri. & Sat. 
11A.,.-10P.I^. 



CLARION STREETS AT NIGHT. 

witti the start of a new semester. 



.The Clarion streets are very busy 
Clarion Call File Photo 



tt 



226-8222 



522 Main St. 





1 2— THE CLARION CALL. Clarion. PA, Thursday, Sept. 10, 1987 

Frat crackdown 
brings results 



AUSTIN, TEX. (CPS) - 
Joining a nationwide crack- 
down on fraternities that be- 
gan in earnest in 1985, the 
University of Texas at Austin 
last week upheld a four-year 
suspension of Phi Kappa Psi, 
ancf hinted more punishments 
may be coming. 

Mark Seeberger, a PKP 
pledge, died of exposure and 
acute alcohol poisoning in Sep- 
tember, 1986, after other frat 
members forced him to drink 
an excessive amount of rum. 

In July, the University of 
Lowell in Massachusetts de- 
cided to ban all fraternities 
and sororities from campus in 
response to the hazing death 
of a student last year. 

Other campuses disciplined 
greek houses during the sum- 
mer, too. 

The Pi Kappa Alpha nation- 
al fraternity msbanded its San 
Diego State chapter for co- 



sponsoring a 1985 party at 
which a student subsequently 
said she was raped. SDSU al- 
ready had expelled the 
chapter through 1991. 

In June, Missouri became 
the latest state to make fra- 
ternity and hazing activities a 
criminal misdemeanor. 

Some greek houses are 
objecting. Seven members of 
Cornell's Phi Gamma Delta 
chapter — which in April was 
suspended for incidents of sex- 
ual abuse and harassment — 
sued Cornell to get a new 
hearing for their case. 

Nevertheless, Texas Presi- 
dent William Cunningham last 
week upheld PKP's suspen- 
sion for the incident, which 
convinced the state Senate to 
pass a law changing hazing 
from a misdemeanor to a fel- 
ony with maximum penalties 
of two years in jaU and a 
$10,000 fine. 



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WEEKNIQHTS T EXPIRES: 9/19/87 

COMPACT DISCS, ALBUMS. CASSETTES. SHEET MUSIt 



Moving in 

Why I'm glad to be back at CUP 



THE CLARION CALL, Clarion, PA, Thursday, Sept. 10, 1987-13 



1. I don't have to make 
bed. 

2. I don't have a curfew. 
3. 1 can dine at Qiandler. 

4. The Weather 

5. Sharpen up on my 
scoping skills. 

6. So I can wait in line 
for a beer. 

7. So I can spend all my 
summer savings on 
books. 

8. To get away from my 
parents. 

9. No summer job. 

10. I can party with old 
friends (and new ones) . 

11. So I can dress the 
way I want to. 






The 

University 
Writing Center 

is 

NoMrOpen 

HOURS: 

Monday-Thurs. 10 a.m. ■ 4 p.m. 
In the Writing Center 

• And • 
2-4 p.m. and 6 -8 p.m. 
In 256 Carlson (Computer Lab) 

* • The Service is Free 
to all students • • 



12. So I can sleep in. 

13. So I can eat all the 
chocolate, pop, and pizza 
I want. 

14. To break in my new 
roommate. 

15. To sleep in my 8:00 
class. 

16. So I can pass through 
all the construction on 
1-80. 

17. To harrass my new 
professors. 

18. And to leave my 
mark as so many have 
before me. 

—Compiled by the 
Clarion Call Staff 

NOT RECEIVED 

Student Parking Decals have not 
been received on campus. Until they 
are available, students should park 
in legal spaces in the Student Park- 
ing Lots Only (B, C, D, G, and J). 
Watch the Bulletin for further infor- 
mation on when the decals will be 
available. 

DECEMBER GRADUATES 

Upcoming interviews for 
Marketing, Economics, Communi- 
cations, Computer Science, Account- 
ing, English, Modern Languages, 
Political Science, History, Psychol- 
ogy, Sociology, Education Majors! 
Stop by Career Placement Services 
for more information. 




UNBRELLAS. . .Rainy weather, cloud- 
ed Clarion skies, as students slosh- 
ed to their first week of classes. 

Photo by Mike Sordo, 
Photography Editor 



White water rafting 

ROTO takes to the water 



by Meg Green 
Contributing Writer 



Tense bodies bounce in an- 
ticipation turning the bend as 
to what lies behind the next 
rock. The sound of the rapidly 
rushing water overtakes what 
littie conversation there may 
have been. Then it hits, the sil- 
^e of the misty morning air 
IS broken by the rush of the 
rapids breaking over the raft. 
Screams mixed with laughter 
and uncertainty climax as the 
ride picks up. Overtaken by 
the excitement, the riders fear 
is replaced by pure pleasure, 
frowns to smiles, dry to wet. 

As the ride tones down 
riders wonder, "When is the 
next time we can do this 
again?" 

A water ride at an amuse- 
ment park during a scorching 
summer afternoon. . .not quite. 
A white water rafting trip 
down the Youghogheny River 
with the Qarion ROTC Cadet 
Golden Eagle Battalion. 

This program is designed to 
promote the interrelationship 
of the cadets, to expose them 
and to help them overcome 



fear, and to give the more ex- 
perienced, upper level cadets 
leadership experience as they 
help the newer cadets. 

Every Friday morning for 
the next three weeks (Sept. 11, 
18, and 25) , cadets will board a 
charter bus for Ohiopyle, Pa., 
where they will tackle the 
most popular white water 

Then it hits, the silence 
of the misty morning 
air is broken by the 
rush of the rapids 
breaking over the raft. 

rafting river in the United 
States, the Youghogheny. 
During the first mile the river 
drops 40 feet. The trip is excit- 
ing, frightening, a lot of fun 
and dangerous at times. 

Safety on the river is a 
major concern and all partici- 
pants must dress appropriate- 
ly and wear life preservers. 
The rafts used by the ROTC 
are sturdy commercial mo- 
dels. 

For more information con- 
tact the ROTC department at 
226-2292. 



PUZZLE 



SOLUTION 



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faultless shifts through 
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Clarion Racketball and 
Fitness Center 

if S^iec^al Stadent ^ate4^^ 

»^ Racketball 
»/'Tennl8 
»^ Aerobics 

(New session begins 9/8) 

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A PEOPLES DRUG STORE 




14-THE CLARION'CALL, Clarion, PA, Thurs day. Se p t. 10, 1987 



THE CLARION CALL, Clarion, PA, Thursday, Sept. 10. 19b/-15 



PHCNE 226-7361 



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Firtt UnM MitMitt Cterdi 

says 

WELCOME BACK!! 

W« would \\k9 to Invite you to our Welcome (B«cl() dinner 
on Tuee., Sept. 15, at 5:45 p.m. Call the church office by 
Sept. 13 noon at 226-6660 for more Info. 
Join us for worship on Sunday mornings at 8:30 and 1 1 :00. 
We are located at the corner of 6th and Wood Streets. 




If YOU 

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OFFER EXPIRES 9/24/87 




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Cheese extra and tax extra 

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OFFER EXPIRES: 9/24/87 



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Watch For Our 
Readboard Specials Too! ! 



38 8th Ave. 
228-5941 

HOURS: 

SUNDAY-THURSDAY 

10:30-MIDNIQHT 

FRIDAY A SATURDAY 
10:30 •1.-0OA.M. 






SFOH^S... 




BliWlf 



by David Mahaffey, 
Sports Editor 



Another summer has passed 
and it is time for footballs to fill 
the air. 

In college football there will be 
a good contest to see who will be 
number one. 

In pre-season polls the so-call- 
ed experts are picking Okla- 
homa, Nebraska or U.C.L.A. No- 
body seems to think that Penn 
State will be able to repeat as na- 
tional champions, not even the 
big man himself, Joe Paterno. 

The only thing I will say is Joe 
Paterno has never been a coach 
to talk up his team, and rememer 
this year Penn State has a real 
quarterback in Matt Knizner. 

In the PSAC West this season 
lUP will be the favorite again, 
but don't forget the Golden Ea- 
gles won four in a row to end the 
1986 season and extended their 
Division II leading non-losing 
season record to 26. That record 
is third overall behind Penn State 
and Grambling. 

Things to watch: 

•The "Boz" in Seattle. He may 
not have shown much in pre-sea- 
son, but he will be one of the best 
impact players in the league. 

*D. J. Dozier in Minnesota. 
Darren Nelson went down with a 
knee injury in preseason, he can 
say good-bye to ever seeing a 
starting job again. Dozier will 
lead the Vikings in rushing and 
may lead them in receiving. 

*Vinny in Tampa Bay. Cough. 
Cough. Gag. Gag. Only Ray Perk- 
ins' coaching will save the Buc- 
caneers. 

•Chuck Noll will get his 171st 
victory when the Steelers get 
their first regular season victory 
this year. That will will make 
Noll the fifth winningest coach in 
the NFL history. 

•I think that Bo Jackson's 
hobby will become a full time 
affair and his summers will be 
spent playing charity Softball 
games for the Raiders. 

And finally: 

The people in Chicago are 
going to do it, now I hope the rest 
of the NFL will follow. In case 
you are wondering what I'm talk- 
ing about, Chicago announced 
that they will be removing the 
astro turf at Soldier Field after 
this year and replacing it with 
real greas. Yeah! 



SPORTS 



Sports 



Tennis 



Striving toward excellence 



by Phil Bujakowski, 
Sports Staff Writer 



When Norbert Baschnagel 
became head coach of the 
Clarion University women's 
tennis team he said it would 
take five years to build a sol- 
id program. He made that 
statement five years ago and 
last year he delivered his 
promise, guiding his Lady 
Eagles to a perfect 13-0 dual 
match record and the school's 
first-ever Pennsylvania State 
Athletic Conference (PSAC) 
Tennis Title. 

The Lady Eagles compUed 
an unprecedented individual 
dual match record of 156-9, 
produced four state singles 
and doubles champions in ad- 
dition to the team title, and 
qualified one doubles team for 
the National Playoffs. All this 
while maintaining a team qpa 
of 3.013. 

So what lies ahead for Clar- 
ion tennis fans this year? 
"We're all thinking very posi- 
tive," states Baschnagel. He 
adds, "This year's squad has 
more total talent than last 
year's." 

The team is led by co-cap- 
tains Sue Fritz and Jane 
Bender. 

Fritz, a senior, is coming off 
an excellent season last year, 
winning the state titles at 
number 2 singles and doubles. 
Her doubles game, with grad- 
uated partner Lynn Fye, 
qualified for Nationals. Fritz 



has had knee surgery over the 
summer and how far she has 
come with rehabilitation will 
have much to do with her 

play- 
Bender, a junior, is also 

coming off an outstanding sea- 
son. Last year she posted a 17- 
2 record at number 5 singles 
and a 6-1 record at number 
one doubles. Jane also boasts 
a 3.9 qpa. Baschnagel feels 
both girls will provide excel- 
lent leadership. 

In addition to the co-cap- 
tains, other top returnees 
include sophomores Lisa War- 
ren (19-0), defending state 
champ at number 1 singles, 
Amanda Bell (18-1), defending 
state champ at number 3 sin- 
gles, and Carolyn Vallecorsa 
(16-1), last year's fifth seed. 
Junior Diana Lee, seeded sev- 
enth last season rounds out the 
top veterans. Other returning 
vets are Debbie McAdams, a 
solid doubles performer in '86, 
Jeanette Budd, and Laura 
Babcock. 

Clarion's freshman recruit- 
ing class is very strong and, 
according to Baschnagel, sev- 
eral players are expected to 
contribute immediately. 

Freshmen to watch are 
Tammy Myers, 14-0 at Ford 
City and ranked fifth in Allegh- 
eny Mountain singles; Lora 
Cohn, who notched a 12-3 
mark at Bethel Park a year 
ago; Rachel Prokopchak, But- 
ler High's number one seed 










! 



ft 

PRACTICE MAKES PERFECT. . .Amanda Bell, shown here hard at work, will 
be one of the returning veterans for the Gglden Eagles this year. 

Photo by Peter B. McMillert, Staff Photograpfier 




*m. 




CO-CAPTAINS. . .Sue Fritz (left), and Jane Bender (right), will serve as the 
captains of the 1987 Clarion University Lady Tennis Team. 



last season with a 12-4 record; 
Renee Tarr, 8-3 her senior 
year at Richlands High, and 
Rosanne Kramarski, an 11-1 
standout from Southmoreland 
High. 

Baschnagel said, "How fast 
the freshmen develop will be 
one key factor in determining 
the success of the team. " 

Walk-ons trying to earn a 
spot on the team include Tra- 
cey Dorsey, Sandra Garver, 
Maureen McDonough, Lynne 
Pazkowski, and Lori Giles. 
Coach Baschnagel will keep 
only 12 players so the competi- 
tion is fierce. 

Aiding Coach Baschnagel is 
Senior Student-Coach Phil 
Popielski. Popielski has been 
with the team four years now 
and, said Baschnagel, "he's 
been a real positive influence 



for our program. He preps the 
courts, helps in practice, and 
this year has also assisted the 
team trainer. His 'do every- 
thing' attitude will certainly 
be missed next season," said 
Baschnagel. The season has 
been dedicated to Popielski 
and senior captain Sue Fritz. 

Clarion's schedule has 5 Di- 
vision I teams this year in- 
cluding Pitt, and some tough 
PSAC adversaries in Blooms- 
burg, Shippensburg, and, as 
Baschnagel sees it, this year's 
sleeper, Slippery Rock. 

The motto for this year's 
squad is "Striving Toward Ex- 
cellence in 1987." After watch- 
ing five minutes of practice, I 
was convinced the team 
means business. Their first 
match is at home today at 3 
p.m. against Penn State-Beh- 
rend. 



Injury problems 
hamper Eagles 



by Rich Maurer, 
Sports Staff Writer 



The Clarion University foot- 
ball program looks to extend 
to 27 the number of consecu- 
tive seasons in which they 
have tallied a non-losing rec- 
ord. 

Pretty impressive, espec- 
ially when you consider that of 
the HI members of Division II 
football, Qarion heads the list 
in that category. 

Equally unpressive is the 
fact that Clarion holds third 
place on the list of Division I- 
A, I-AA, and II. They're 
behind Penn State (48) and 
Grambling (27). 

Ttie season opens this Satur- 



day at home with Fairmont 
State. 

This year's squad is not 
without its problems, but head 
coach (Jene Sobolewski points 
out a number of bright spots. 

Doug Emminger, 1986 start- 
ing quarterback, is one ques- 
tion mark, but sophomore 
Doug Dawson and freshman 
Mike Carter could provide a 
nice answer. 

Enmiinger has been side- 
lined with a knee injury and 
expects to find out his status 
soon. Sobolewski may red 
shirt the senior and says it will 
be a toss up between Dawson 
and Carter if he does. 

In addition to losing the 

(See Eagles. . .Page 18) 



»* ^ 



16— THE CLARION CALL, Clarion, PA, Thursday, Sept. 10, 1987 



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Baseball scholarship awarded 



Ed Rhoades, a native of 
Venus, Pa., and currently a 
senior at Clarion University, 
has been named the first re- 
cipient of the annual "Ernest 
W. Johnson Memorial Schol- 
arship." The scholarship 
award was announced this 
past summer through the 
Clarion University Founda- 
tion and will be given yearly 
to a returning Clarion Uni- 
versity baseball player 
based on academic accom- 
plishments the previous aca- 
demic year. 

"I'm extremely flattered 
and appreciative of being se- 
lected as the first recipient 
for this scholarship," said 
Rhoades. "I'm very proud to 
be a part of the Clarion Uni- 
versity baseball program 
and would like to take the op- 
portunity to thank Mrs. John- 
son, coach McCauliff and 
those involved in the scholar- 
ship for this award. I look at 
the academic scholarship as 
a personal triumph, being 
able to accomplish my work 
in the classroom and still 
participate in a fine baseball 
program." 

Rhoades accumulated a 
3.91 QPA during the 1986-87 
academic year, including a 
perfect 4.0 QPA in the Spnng 
semester (during the base- 
ball season). A Marketing 
major at Clarion, Rhoades 
has a three-year (career) 
batting average of .332 (80 of 
241), has scored 49 runs, with 
49 RBI's, 14 doubles, 4 triples 

Clarion Football 



and one home run. Voted to 
the 1986 PSAC-West first 
team, Rhoades hit .403 as a 
freshman, .344 as a 
sophomore and a.235 as a 
junior. 

The 1987 Clarion baseball 
team finished 11-11 overall 
and third in the PSAC-West 
with a 7-9 conference record. 
Rhoades, the starting right- 
fielder all three seasons, has 
also compiled a 2-0 record as 
a starting pitcher. 

He is the son of Charles and 
Rose Rhoades of RD 1 Venus, 
and has an overall QPA at 
Clarion of 3.53. He is also a 
1984 graduate of Venango 
Quistian High School and was 
a multiple letterwinner in 
baseball, football and wrest- 
ling. 

"I believe Ed is an ex- 
tremely deserving recipient 
and is truly representative of 
the scholarship and what 
Ernie (Johnson) exemplified 
through his efforts as a coach 
and faculty member at 
Clarion," commented Eagle 
baseball coach Barry 
McCauliff. "I would like to 
personally think Mrs. John- 
son, her aunt Mrs. Helen 
Evans, and of course all of 
those who so generously have 
made the Ernest W. Johnson 
Memorial Baseball Scholar- 
ship a reality." 

The scholarship itself was 
set up memory of Ernie 
"Turk" Johnson, following 
his death on Dec. 9, 1985. 
Spearheaded by his wife 



Margery (Cook) Johnson and 
her aunt, Mrs. Helen Evans, 
the scholarship gained mo- 
mentum and has been es- 
tablished as a yearly, aca- 
demic award for a returning 
CUP baseball player. 

Ernie Johnson was a 
native of Johnsonburg and 
graduated from Johnsonburg 
High School in 1940. After a 
stint in the U.S. Air Force. 
Johnson attended Clarion 
University and was a 1947 
graduate, earning his B.S. 
Degree in Education. At 
Clarion, Johnson earned 
three letters each in baseball 
and football, plus coached 
Clarion to an undefeated sea- 
son in baseball in 1947. 

Leaving Clarion for only a 
short period of time to teach 
at Beaver Falls High (1947- 
48), Beaver High (1948-55) 
and Baldwin (NY) (1955-56), 
he returned to his alma ma- 
ter as an associate professor 
and assistant football coach 
in 1956. In 1957 he became 
Clarion's head football coach 
and accumulated a 23-23-3 
slate from 1957-62. In 
slate from 1957-62. In addi- 
tion to football, Ernie was the 
head baseball coach from 
1956-63. After returning to the 
classroom full-time for 10 
years (1963-73), Ernie was 
named Director of Public Re- 
lations in 1973 and remained in 
that capacity through 1978 
when he retired. 

(Story courtesy of the Office of 
Sports Information, C.U.P.). 



Welcomes new assistant 



by Frank Ashton, 
Sports Staff Writer 



Joe Johnson, the newest 
member of the 1987-88 Clarion 
University coaching staff, 
comes to Clarion University 
with impressive credentials. 

A graduate of Cardoza High 
School in Washington, D.C., 
Coach Johnson was a three- 
year letterman at linebacker 
and tig^t-end and was captain 
his junior and senior years. He 
attended Langston Univer- 
sity in Oklahoma. There he 
was a four-year letterman and 
three year starter at defensive 
back. 

While at Langston he set an 
NCIA record with a 100-yard 
interception return for a touch- 
down. He was a first-team 
selection for the NAIA's Dis- 
trict 9 and All-America 
squads. 

His coaching credentials in- 
clude a student-coach position 
at Langston University. He 
then went to Millswood 
Junior-Senior High School as 
the defensive coordinator 
from 1981-84. In 1986 he was 
the defensive coordinator at 
Clarion Area High School. 
Now he is the offensive back 



coach here at CUP. 

Cbach Johnson will also be 
acting as the academic liason 
for the football team. In this 
position he will be helping with 
scheduling and tutorial prob- 
lems of the players. 

As for the players on the 
field, coach Johnson likes 
what he sees. "We have a lot 



of young players who are 
coming along well," he said. 
He feels the team is physically 
and mentally ready for the up- 
coming season and he sees 
good things out on the field. 
Health is the important factor 
at this point. Johnson said, 
"Staying healthy is the key to 
a successful season." 




NEW COACH. . .Joe Johnson is the newest member of the Clarion Univer- 
sity Football Staff. Photo bv Chuck Lizza. Staff Photographer 



Volleyball Preview 



by Susan Kurtz, 
Sports Staff Writer 



The 1987 women's volley- 
ball team will officially open 
its season Sept. 11-12 at the 
Navy Tournament. 

Cindy Opalski, returning 
head coach is very excited 
about this year's team. 

Combining coaching skills 
with Opalski this year will be 
assistant coach Ellen Omer. 
An alumni from Penn State, 
Orner is also actively partici- 
pating on a women's profes- 
sional volleyball team. 

Opalski feels that the Navy 
Tournament will not be easy 
for Clarion. 

"Our goal is to prepare for 
our conference games. The 
teams at the Navy Tourna- 
ment are all nationally rank- 
ed, stated Opalski. 



Coach Opalski also feels 
that, although last year's 
Navy tournament was some 
of their toughest matches, 
the girls played at their best. 

This year's captain and 
only senior, Barbera Buck, 
contributes this to the fact 
that in past seasons, the 
team's skill level peaked too 
early in the season. 

TTiis year's team is young 
but promising. Team mem- 
bers include: Senior Barbera 
Buck, captain, and junior co- 
captains Tammy Wolf and 
Missy O'Rourke. 

Returning sophomores are 
Diane Guenther, Sharon Mil- 
ler and Christine Comali. 

The newest members of this 
year's squad include Kelli 
Blosel, Sue Holcombe, Denise 
Layton, Jodi Pezek and Carrie 
Walker. 



9 



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18-THE CLARION'CALL, Clarion, PA, Thursday, Sept. 10, 1987 



Eagles.... 



(Continued from Page 15) 



number one offensive player 
and tri-captain, the Golden 
Eagles have lost the service of 
the number one defensive 
player and tri-captain, at least 
for the first two weeks. 

Lou Weiers, who tied for the 
team lead with 94 tackles, suf- 
fered a shoulder injury. He 
may be back in time for con- 
ference play. 

John Besic, senior comer- 
back, wraps up the captains 
as a leader of special teams. 
Sobolewski is looking for 
"Bes" to have a big season 
and thinks Besic has pro-po- 
tential. 

An injury also nipped senior 
center Jerry Fedell. That 
caused him to miss fall camp, 
but, bright spot Dave 
McLaughlin stepped in. Mc- 
Laughlin proved himself and 
earned a spot on the "0" line. 

Fedell is working to get 
back in shape and should be 
ready for the season. 

Overall, Sobolewski seems 
excited about the season. He 
will look to get some young 
players experience in the non- 
conference games the first 
two weeks. 

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One rule that "Sobe" has al- 
ways enforced and is uphold- 
ing this year is no drinking in 
public for his squad. Accord- 
ing to Sobolewski, "The wh ole 
school has a responsibility in 
that matter, but athletes are 
an elite group. If someone 
sees a player wearing a foot- 
ball jacket into a oar the 
whole team becomes *a bunch 
of drunks'." 

Sobolewski does not like the 
many problems created in 



that situation. While he 
doesn't condone the players 21 
and over drinking he appar- 
ently will not tolerate public 
drinking. 

It will take a total team ef- 
fort for the Golden Eagles to 
preserve their record non- 
losing streak. It will also take 
a couple games for the coach- 
ing staff to answer some ques- 
tions and get the team ready 
for PSAC action. 



10 

11 

12 



14 
15 
16 



SPORTS CALENDAR 

SEPTEMBER 

Tennis vs. Penn State - Behrend 3 p.m. 

Volleyball at Navy 

Tennis vs. Setan Hill 10:30 a.m. 

Football vs. Fairmont State 2 p.m. 

Men's and Women's X-Counti7 vs. Lock Haven 11 a.m. 

Tennis vs. St. Bonaventure 3 p.m. 

Volleyball at Allegheny w/Slippery Rock 
Tennis at St. Francis 



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Tri-Captains Named 



THE CLARION CALL, Claflon, PA, Thursday. Sept 10, 1987-19 



Clarion University football 
head coach Gene Sobolewski 
officially announced the 
team's 1987 gridiron captains. 
The Golden Eagles will have 
tri-captains in 1987 including 
defensive cornerback John 
Besic, quarterback Doug Em- 
minger and defensive tackle 
Lou Weiers. 

"They will be very good 
captains and outstanding 
team leaders," commented 
Eag^e mentor Gene Sobolew- 
ski. "All three have the ath- 
letic ability, playing maturity 
and motivational qualities 
needed to handle this import- 
ant position." 

Besic, a 6-0, 198-pound 
senior, cornerback from Steel- 
ton, Pa., has already been a 
two-year starter with the 
Golden Eagles. The captain of 
the Qarion University "Spe- 
cial Teams" for 1987, he was 
honored in 1986 by being se- 
lected as a first team all-con- 



ference choice at defensive 
back. 

Besic garnered 80 tackles 
and one interception, along 
with four broken-up passes 
last year. In 1985 Besic collect- 
ed 43 hits and four intercep- 
tions, plus he lettered on the 
1983 Clarion PSAC Champion- 
ship team. Considered a play- 
er with "pro-potential" by So- 
bolewski, he possesses 4.4/40 
speed and is a very aggressive 
player. A Business Manage- 
ment major at Clarion, John is 
the son of Stephen J. Besic of 
Steelton, and is a 1983 grad- 
uate of Steelton-Highspire 
High School. 

Emminger, a 5-11, 180- 
pound, senior, quarterback 
from Kittanning, will captain 
the offensive unit for 1987. 
Doug has been the Golden Ea- 
gles' signal caller since mid- 
way through the 1965 season, 
when starting quarterback 
Pat Carbol suffered a season- 




FOOTBALL CAPTAINS. . . .for the 1987 Golden Eagles are Lou Weiers (front). 
Doug Emminger (back left), and John Besic (right). Photo by Chuck Lizza 

_ St aff Photographer 

DnNC€R'S STUDIO 

501 MAIN STREET CLARION 

ANNOUNCES 

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ending injury. Showing poise 
from his first starting assign- 
ment against lUP, Doug 
finished 1985 completing 70 of 
134 passes for 736 yards and 
three td's. Last season Doug 
displayed all-conference type 
leaderehip in completing 148 
of 269 aerials for 1,926 yards 
and 11 td's. In the last game of 
1986 against Westminster, 
Emminger set two single 
game records including com- 
pletions (29) and passing 
yards (336). 

In his career Emminger has 
clicked on 220 of 409 passes 
(53.8%) for 2,684 yards and 14 
td's, plus has shown a running 
ability that puts a lot of pres- 
sure on the defensive comers. 
A Communication major at 
Qarion, I>oug is the son of 
Mrs. J. E. EnMninger of Kit- 
tanning, and is a 1984 gradu- 
ate of Kittanning High School. 

Weiers, a 6-2, 234-pound, 
senior, defensive tackle from 
Latrobe, will be the Eagles' 
defensive captain for 1987. 
Voted by the Associated Press 
as a third team Ail-American 
Defensive Tackle in 1986, 
Weiers displayed an unrelent- 
ing style 01 play on the defen- 
sive line. EcjuaUy good against 
the run and the pass, Weiers 
tied for the team lead in tack- 
les with 94, and in quarterback 
sacks with seven last season. 
Also selected as a first team 
choise on the 1986 PSAC-West- 
em Division, Pittsburgh Press 
and Pittsburgh Post-Gazette 
squads, Lou seems poised for 
an even better 1987. A Political 
Science major at (Ularion, he is 
the son of Don and Laura Wei- 
ers of Latrobe. Lou is also a 
1984 graduate of Derry Area 
ffigh School. 





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On Campus This Sunday . . . 

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ORIGINAL MATERIAL: ANNAH 

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20— THE CLAHION CALL (Jiarion, HA I hursday, bept. iu, 1^0/ 



Welcome back 

Students ! 



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New High 

CUP hits record enrollment 



by Liz Koones, 
News Editor 



According to preliminary 
figures released oy the Uni- 
versity, enrollment is up 
from last fall. A record 6,190 
students, up from last fall's 
6,112, are now attending 
Clarion University. 

The figures compare 
favorably with last year's 
undergraduate student level, 
while the number of part-time 
graduate students has in- 



creased. 

•*We have continued to 
gradually increase our en- 
rollment at Clarion Univer- 
sity throughout the decade," 
said President Thomas A. 
Bond. "The figures are pre- 
liminary at this point, but the 
increases in enrollment may 
be attributed to Clarion's ex- 
cellent academic reputation, 
expanded programs, and af- 
fordable tuition." 

Enrollment figures show 



4,728 undergraduate, 56 post- 
undergraduate, and 807 grad- 
uate students at main cam- 
pus. Enrollment at Venango 
Campus includes 595 under- 
gramiate and four post- 
undergraduate students. 

The figures are prelim- 
inary due to late registration, 
drop-add, and several grad- 
uate level courses with later 
starting dates. Comprehen- 
sive enrollment figures will 
be released later in the se- 
mester. 



Clarion University Student Enrollment 



1987* 
1986 



6,190 




H 



1000 2000 3000 4000 5000 6000 7000 
Total Student Enrollment 



■(^ctiiiiiiirisry c.Tiwiiiiiniu ■ i... -r 



Vol. 59 No. 2 



The 



Thursday.Sept. 17, 1987 



LARION 



rAii 



Ctaiion ^niuexUttf of U^EnniijLoania 



Activities Day 

Students meet organizations 



by Peggy Meister, 
News Staff Writer 



Activities Day, an annual 
feature at Clarion University, 
took place on Sunday, Sept. 13. 
Each year numerous campus 
organizations gather outside 
Harvey Hall to pass out infor- 
mation on their groups, meet 
new people, and recruit inter- 
estecf students. 



From 1-4 p.m. on Sunday, 47 
campus groups set up displays 
on the sidewalks between Har- 
vey and Peirce. Many diverse 
interests were represented, 
from the University Theatre 
to foreign language clubs, and 
several Greek organizations. 
Honorary societies, religious 
fellowships and the campus 
media groups also displayed 



informational booths. 

While some students dis- 
cussed common interests with 
campus groups and signed up 
for organizational meetings, 
others strolled into Harvey 
Hall's Multi-Purpose Room to 
enjoy the rock sounds of the 
band "10 til Destiny," spon- 
sored by Center Board. Per- 
forming many current rock 




MEET CUP Students inquire into meetings and activities of Clarion International Association, one of many organiza- 
tions represented at Sunday's Activities Day. Photo by Frank Lotito, Staff Photographer 



tunes, the group provided 
background music for the 
activities outside as well as 
entertaining many students 
inside. 

A bad weather forecast, wet 
ground and unsteady wind 
prevented the hot air balloon 



. . .the organizations 
involved seemed pleas- 
ed with the student re- 
sponse. .." 



rides from being held as orig- 
inally scheduled. But condi- 
tions improved and several 
students did have the oppor- 
tunity to get a bird's-eye-view 
of the campus. 

Hal Wassink, the director 
of Student Activities which 
sponsored Activities Day, 
considered student response 
"good, but not overwhelm- 
ing. There seemed to be stu- 
dents regularly throughout 
the day, and the organiza- 
tions involved seemed pleased 
with the student response, and 
generally considered Activi- 
ties Day successful." 

Wassink went on to ex- 
press appreciation to the 
groups who took part for 
putting forth the effort to pre- 
sent some fascinating dis- 




SLINKY CREATURE. . . Photographers, 
like Frank Lotito, weren't the only 
sight see-ers on Activities Day. Some 
pounded the pavement while others 
slithered. Photo by Mike Bordo. 

Photography Editor 

plays, and voiced thanks to 
the maintenance staff, the in- 
dividuals "behind the scenes" 
who made setting up Activi- 
ties Day possible and success- 
ful. 



Housing Change 

Receiye Welcome 

News— Page 5 



Women's Volleyball 
SMkesWln 

Sports — Page 5 



CUP Builds Bond 
With li^tand 

Features —Page 9 



Weekly 
Crossword Puzzle 

Features — Page 12 



2- THE CLA RION CALL, Clarion, PA. Thursday, Sept. 17, 1987 



U 




SIDE 



im\ 




' 



HIDE Pfl 

The Need for General Education In Nursing^ 



Hidden Faces 



by Debbie Schofield. 
EditoHn-Chlef , the Clarion Call 

Human communication is the lifeblood of our daily existence. 
Through jobs, school, and recreation we encounter other people, some 
with whom we are familiar, and some with whom we are not. And still 
others, we meet for the first time. Immediately, interaction takes place 
... .a report is given, a luncheon date is made, weekend plans are con- 
fimied. While the interaction is taking place, our minds work on cate- 
gorizing our partner in communication. But that's all right; it's a natural 
tendency. Anytime we encounter a new situation, our minds automati- 
cally relate it to something we are familiar with or have experienced be- 
fore. But what so often becomes our downfall in this complicated pro- 
cess is to prejudge someone and fit them into a categorized mold so that 
even they can't escape. 

Prejudice is not a group problem; it's an individual problem. Fm not 
talking about a particular prejudice of race, creed, or color. Fm talking 
about the prejudice that goes on between everyone everyday when we 
consciously categorize and limit those whom we encounter. Just be- 
cause someone's particular characteristics or qualities aren't familiar to 
us or don't fit into our personal standards, it doesn't mean we should 
close the door in their faces. Have you ever considered how many peo- 
ple have passed through our lives who would have contributed to our 
character but were unable because we turned away? On the other hand, 
have you ever considered how many people have had a great 
influence 

influence on our lives because we let down those self-gratifying barriers? 

E. L. Hartly, author of Problems in Prejudice, did a study of 
college students and their prejudices. He asked the students to judge 32 
familiar nations which included, unknown to the students, three facti- 
tious groups - the "Daniereans," the "Pireneans," and the "Wahlonians." 
As it turned out, these three particular groups were interestingly victims 
of harsh prejudice. 

By now, you are probably wondering why f chose this example 
when I made it clear before I was talking about individual prejudices. 
It's because an important lesson, pertinent here, also applies to our daily 
communication. Simply enough, prejudice is being down on something 
you're not up on. 

(See Life. ..Page 4) 



(i^The Clarion Call 

^J^ Room 1 Harvey Ha lt 

^ Clarion University of Pennsylvania 

A Kg. Clarion, Pennsylvania 16214 

n Tl Phone 814-226-2380 

[■•■■■■ ■I 

THE STAFF 

Editor in Chief DEBORAH M. SCHOFIELD 

News Editor UZ M. KOONES 

Features Editor MARIA L KASAK 

Sports Editor DAVID M. MAHAFFEY 

Ad Design Editor CHRISTINE JANECZEK 

Ad Sales Manager RICHARD W. FAIRBEND 

Business Manager MICHAEL P. BAUER 

Adviser ART BARLOW 

Photography Edifor MIKE BORDO 

Circulation Manager PETER B. McMILLEN 

Copy Ejjitors VONDA SWARTS 



The Clarion Call is published every Thursday during the school year In K:cordance with the school 
calendar. Editors accept contributions to their sections from any source, but reserve the right to edit 
all copy lor libel, taste, style and length. 

The absolute deadline for editorial copy is 12:00 noon on Monday. 

The opinions expressed in the editorials are those of the writers and not necessarily the opinion 
of the university or of the student t>ody. 



Advertising Rates: 

Display Ads: Per Column Inch 




Mail Subscription Rates: 

$4.50 Per Semester j\5 

Per Academic Year $s 

American Scholastic Press Association 
Award Winner 

Funded by Student Activity Fee 




IMr. Dennis L. Wicldlne 

Nursing education is undergoing a 
transformation from being primar- 
ily taught in hospitals with emphasis 
essentially on clinical courses, to 
being taught in colleges and uni- 
versities with the addition of general 
education as well as clinical courses. 
What, if any, is the value to a prac- 
ticing nurse of the general educa- 
tion? 
My firm answer is : immense. 
Nurses are people who must make 
numerous decisions on a minute-to- 
minute basis, often based on scanty 
information. They must identify and 
prioritize many tasks to be accom- 
plished and then be ready to change 
the priority rapidly. They interpret 
and carry out intricate medical or- 
ders. They interview and diagnose 
problems that people have in their 
lives and make plans to assist them 
to correct or alleviate them. All of 
these brief statements on what 
nurses do point to one face: a nurse 
must be a thinking, resourceful, 
questioning, interested, and articu- 
late person, in addition to being able 

Norm's Dorm 



to perform a myraid of clinical du- 
ties. How does a person become a 
nurse with all the attributes I have 
listed? My answer is th rough a col- 
legiate program that emphasizes 
general education as well as clinical 
education. 

General education, as an entity, is 
difficult to precisely define. Each 
University determines their own 
brand of "general education." My 
opinion regarding general education 
is that it should do some very spe- 
cific things, or more precisely, a stu- 
dent should be capable of some very 
specific things after having been 
through it. 

I believe a student should have a 
sense of the "big picture." I believe 
they should be able to relate current 
ideas and situations to past and 
future events. This relational ability 
will help the nurse to feel that th ey 
are not trapped into a situation that 
has no beginning or end. The nurse 
should be able to identify past events 
that led to the current situation, and 
probable future events based on the 
facts at hand. This ability is a criti- 
cal factor in establishing nursing as 
an independent profession. 

Second, a student should be able to 
communicate effectively with others 
through written and verbal means. 
Communication is the basis for the 
day-to-day practice of nursing. 
Nurses give report from one shift to 
another, alerting the oncoming shift 
of significant facts for each of their 
patients. They chart significant 
facts and impressions about the pa- 
tients in the medical record. They 
notify and discuss the patients' con- 
dition with physicians, social work- 
ers, physical therapists, x-ray tech- 
nicians, and many other health pro- 
fessionals. In short, a nurse who 
cannot communicate is severely 
hampered from performing his or 
her job. 

Third, a student should be able to 
think. To be able to analyze and 
question, to not routinely and rotely 
perform tasks, and to be able to as- 
sert their thoughts in the situation at 



hand. To be able to think is a con- 
glomeration of many abilities (com- 
munication, relationships, technical 
skills, and knowledge) and is very 
difficult to measure. But the need 
remains: nurses must be thinkers, 
and general education should lead 
students to that end. The value of 
good general education should not 
and cannot be ignored. 

It is probable that all of us at some 
time will need to place our trust in a 




nurse. Let us hope that they possess 
the necessary skills that will help us 
at that time. 

—by Dennis L. Wickline, R.N.. 
B.S., B.S.N.. C.N.A. 

Mr. Wickline graduated from 
Clarion University in 1974 with a BS 
in Biology and in 1984 with a BS in 
Nursing. He is the Vice President for 
Patient Care Services at the Brook- 
ville Hospital. He is the past Presi- 
dent of the Clarion University Alum- 
ni Association (1985-86), and Presi- 
dent of the Northwestern Pennsyl- 
vania Organization for Nurse 
Executives. 







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SYHPT^5 





Ideas and thoughts 
are accepted and en- 
couraged as letters 
to the editor. All con- 
tributions should he 
made to the Clarion 
Call office, 1 Harvey 
Hall 



All letters must be sign- 
ed but name will be with- 
held upon request 




SETTLING IN. . . Fog blankets much of CUP's early morning campus as one student takes a moment to admire the 
tranquility. Photo by Mike Bordo, Photography Editor 



THE CLARION CALL, Clarion. PA, Thursday. Sept. 17. 1987-3 

The Call Mailbox: 



(( 



Parking" 



To Whom It May Concern : 

I want to thank Public Safety for 
the nice ticket I received during the 
game of "Musical Parking Lots" 
everyone had to play at the begin- 
ning of the semester. It's not that I 
didn't understand the problem. I had 
lots of time to look at all the bumpers 
without stickers the 10 minutes I 
took driving around trying to find a 
place to park. I finally gave up and 
parked as close to a parking place 
that I could, since I was already late 
for work. 

The thing that really irks me is 
that they could see that I was an em- 
ployee since we all have to show our 
"cute" little stickers to make their 
jobs easier. Well how about giving us 
a break and making our job easier. 
Let's face it. When you work at a 
place where you can't find parking 
no matter how hard you try and then 
get ticketed besides — it doesn't 
say much for our institution. At least 
the guests and the students get a 
break. Parking tickets for guests are 
voided and security take the time to 
contact most of the students without 
ticketing them, but I guess we don't 
count. We just work here. Public 
Safety better wise up and get their 
priorities in order. 

Name withheld by request 

"White Arts" 

Dear Editor: 

May 7 of last semester's Clarion 
Call gave coverage to a series of 
Spring parties unfortunately called 
the white arts festival. I find this 
label more than just unfortunate; 
such a name and the present struc- 
ture of these parties are racist in 
consequence. The Call article ac- 
knowledges the racist origins and 
exclusionary structure as a pre- 
judiced reaction to the cultural en- 
richment provided by events such as 
the Black Arts Festival; the purpose 
of so-called "white arts" as an event 
makes no pretense of enriching the 



intellectual life at CUP, but is de- 
fined in the article as a " week- 
long party for . . .(white) students, 
by. . . .(white) students. ' "It is some 
fun for some students here at the 
expense of other CUP students. 

The origins of this type of "home- 
coming" are exclusionary and of- 
fensive to many here at CUP, what- 
ever the intentions of the present or- 
ganizers. It does not make the situ- 
ation acceptable for the few white 
students contacted by the Call to 
simply declare white arts to be inno- 
cent of racism ; such an attitude is 
intentional or unintentional in- 
sensitivity. Because the organizers 
are "fond of the name" white arts 
and protest their fun-loving intent 
does not change the racist symbol- 
ism of the pvents of the week for me. 
The realities of a multi-ethnic 
campus community make a 
statement from the article that 
"there has never been a major crim- 
inal problem concerning White Arts 
Festival " a comfortable but ir- 
relevant concern. The "crime" 
against inclusion and human dignity 
is the problem of what the Call 
seems to condone by its coverage en- 
titled "White Arts Week starts." 

These parties are not "open to ev- 
eryone" as the Call article states, 
because of the barriers provided by 
the exclusionary name and organi- 
zational structure; there do not need 
to he "whites only" signs posted. 
There are plenty of t-shirts, often in- 
nocently worn, that help serve a seg- 
regative purpose — such is the 
nature of institutional racism. The 
CUP community has made and sus- 
tains so-called white arts week. 

We publicize it "as synonymous 
with Clarion University's spring 

gatherings " We must realize 

what we made in total effect. What 
we make we can change as good, 
truly educated, ethical citizens so as 
not to contaminate fun and release 
in the Spring for all members of the 
CUP community. 
Sincerely, 
Robert Girvan 
Sociology 







f5 



90 Merle Si'jeet. Clarion. PA 16214 

Phone 226-7070 o^ 



^^^><:c^Qc^ <^i^aP^^ 



2— THE CLARION CALL, Clarion, PA, Thursday, Sept. 17, 1987 




SIDE 



Hidden Faces 

by Debbie Schofield. 
Editor-in-Chief, the Clarion Call 

Humein communication is the lifeblood of our daily existence. 
Through jobs, school, and recreation we encounter other people, some 
with whom we are familiar, and some with whom we are not. And still 
others, we meet for the first time. Immediately, interaction takes place 
— a report is given, a luncheon date is made, weekend plans are con- 
firmed. While the interaction is taking place, our minds work on cate- 
gorizing our partner in communication. But that's all right; it's a natural 
tendency. Anytime we encounter a new situation, our minds automati- 
cally relate it to something we are familiar with or have experienced be- 
fore. But what so often becomes our downfall in this complicated pro- 
cess is to prejudge someone and fit them into a categorized mold so that 
even they can't escape. 

Prejudice is not a group problem; it's an individual problem. Fm not 
talking about a particular prejudice of race, creed, or color. Fm talking 
about the prejudice that goes on between everyone everyday when we 
consciously categorize and limit those whom we encounter. Just be- 
cause someone's particular characteristics or qualities aren't familiar to 
us or don't fit into our personal standards, it doesn't mean we should 
close the door in their faces. Have you ever considered how many peo- 
ple have passed through our lives who would have contributed to our 
character but were unable because we turned away? On the other hand, 
have you ever considered how many people have had a great 
influence 
influence on our lives because we let down those self-gratifying barriers? 

E. L. Hartly, author of Problems in Prejudice, did a study of 
college students and their prejudices. He asked the students to judge 32 
familiar nations which included, unknown to the students, three facti- 
tious groups — the "Daniereans," the "Pireneans," and the "Wahlonians." 
As it turned out, these three particular groups were interestingly victims 
of harsh prejudice. 

By now, you are probably wondering why I chose this example 
when I made it clear before I was talking about individual prejudices. 
It's because an important lesson, pertinent here, also applies to our daily 
communication. Simply enough, prejudice is being down on something 
you're not up on. 

(See Life. . .Page 4) 



^The Clarion Call 

^^gy Room 1 Harvey Hall 

Clarion University of Pennsylvania 
'X ^^ Clarion, Pennsylvania 16214 

n ■ Phone 814-226-2380 

■■■■•■■■I 

THE STAFF 

Editor in Chief DEBORAH M. SCHOFIELD 

News Editor '-'^*^-.'^8?or! 

Features Editor MARIA L.KA&KK 

Sports Editor DAVID M. MAHAFFEY 

AdDesign Editor CHRISTINE JANECZEK 

Ad Sales Manager RICHARD W. FAIRBEND 

Ptiotography Ediior MIKE BORDO 

Circulation Manager PETER B. McMILLEN 

Copy Editors VONDASWARTS 



The Clarion Call is published every Thursday during the school year in accordance with the school 
calendar. Editors accept contributions to their sections from any source, but reserve the right to edit 
all copy lor libel, taste, style and length. 

The absolute deadline for editorial copy is 12:00 noon on Monday. 

The opinions expressed in the editorials are those of the writers and not necessarily the opinion 
of the university or of the student t>ody. 



Advertising Rates: 

Display Ads: Per Column Inch $4.50 




Mail Subscription Rates: 

Per Semester S5 

Per Academic Year $8 



American Schoiastic Press Association 
Award Winner 

Funded by Student Activity Fee 



HIDE PA 




The Need for General Education 




IMr. Dennis L. Wicidine 



Nursing education is undergoing a 
transformation from being primar- 
ily taught in hospitals with emphasis 
essentially on clinical courses, to 
being taught in colleges and uni- 
versities with the addition of general 
education as well as clinical courses. 
What, if any, is the value to a prac- 
ticing nurse of the general educa- 
tion? 

My firm answer is : immense. 

Nurses are people who must make 
numerous decisions on a minute-to- 
minute basis, often based on scanty 
information. They must identify and 
prioritize many tasks to be accom- 
plished and then be ready to change 
the priority rapidly. They interpret 
and carry out intricate medical or- 
ders. They interview and diagnose 
problems that people have in their 
lives and make plans to assist them 
to correct or alleviate them All of 
these brief statements on what 
nurses do point to one face: a nurse 
must be a thinking, resourceful, 
questioning, interested, and articu- 
late person, in addition to being able 

Norm's Dorm 



to perform a myraid of clinical du- 
ties. How does a person become a 
nurse with all the attributes I have 
listed? My answer is th rough a col- 
legiate program that emphasizes 
general education as well as clinical 
education. 

General education, as an entity, is 
difficult to precisely define. Each 
University determines their own 
brand of "general education." My 
opinion regarding general education 
is that it should do some very spe- 
cific things, or more precisely, a stu- 
dent should be capable of some very 
specific things after having been 
through it. 

I believe a student should have a 
sense of the "big picture." I believe 
they should be able to relate current 
ideas and situations to past and 
future events. This relational ability 
will help the nurse to feel that th ey 
are not trapped into a situation that 
has no beginning or end. The nurse 
should be able to identify past events 
that led to the current situation, and 
probable future events based on the 
facts at hand. This ability is a criti- 
cal factor in establishing nursing as 
an independent profession. 

Second, a student should be able to 
communicate effectively with others 
through written and verbal means. 
Communication is the basis for the 
day-to-day practice of nursing. 
Nurses give report from one shift to 
another, alertmg the oncoming shift 
of significant facts for each of their 
patients. They chart significant 
facts and impressions about the pa- 
tients in the medical record. They 
notify and discuss the patients' con- 
dition with physicians, social work- 
ers, physical therapists, x-ray tech- 
nicians, and many other health pro- 
fessionals. In short, a nurse who 
cannot communicate is severely 
hampered from performing his or 
her job. 

Third, a student should be able to 
think. To be able to analyze and 
question, to not routinely and rotely 
perform tasks, and to be able to as- 
sert their thoughts in the situation at 



hand. To be able to think is a con- 
glomeration of many abilities (com- 
munication, relationships, technical 
skills, and knowledge) and is very 
difficult to measure. But the need 
remains: nurses must be thinkers, 
and general education should lead 
students to that end. The value of 
good general education should not 
and cannot be ignored. 

It is probable that all of us at some 
time will need to place our trust in a 




nurse. Let us hope that they possess 
the necessary skills that will help us 
at that time. 

—by Dennis L. Wickline, R.N., 
B.S.,B.S.N.,C.N.A. 

Mr. Wickline graduated from 
Clarion University in 1974 with a BS 
in Biology and in 1964 with a BS in 
Nursing. He is the Vice President for 
Patient Care Services at the Brook- 
ville Hospital. He is the past Presi- 
dent of the Clarion University Alum- 
ni Association (1985-86), and Presi- 
dent of the Northwestern Pennsyl- 
vania Organization for Nurse 
Executives. 






1 




WHv/12.' That; 



r.i:. Ck»^/'-r TRi'V/K 

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SYMPT<9^5 




' 




Ideas and thoughts 
are accepted and en- 
couraged as letters 
to the editor. All con- 
tributions should be 
made to the Clarion 
Call office, 1 Harvey 
Hall 



All letters must be sign- 
ed but name mil be mth- 
held upon request. 



Norm's Dorm 






CXiT., 




ue 73 SEE SO'-IE 
X.C*. 





"^Pd H^c. 



ZA<^l9s7 







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SETTLING IN. . . Fog blankets much of CUP's early morning campus as one student tal^es a moment to admire the 



THE CLARION CALL, Clarion, PA, Thursday, Sept. 17. 1987-3 

The Call Mailbox: 



"Parking" 

To Whom It May Concern : 

I want to thank Public Safety for 
the nice ticket I received during the 
game of "Musical Parking Lots" 
everyone had to play at the begin- 
ning of the semester. It's not that I 
didn't understand the problem. I had 
lots of time to look at all the bumpers 
without stickers the 10 minutes I 
took driving around trying to find a 
place to park. I finally gave up and 
parked as close to a parking place 
that I could, since I was already late 
for work. 

The thing that really irks me is 
that they could see that I was an em- 
ployee since we all have to show our 
"cute" Httle stickers to make their 
jobs easier. Well how about giving us 
a break and making our job easier. 
Let's face it. When you work at a 
place where you can't find parking 
no matter how hard you try and then 
get ticketed besides — it doesn't 
say much for our institution. At least 
the guests and the students get a 
break. Parking tickets for guests are 
voided and security take the time to 
contact most of the students without 
ticketing them, but I guess we don't 
count. We just work here. Public 
Safety better wise up and get their 
priorities in order. 

Name withheld by request 

"White Arts" 

Dear Editor: 

May 7 of last semester's Clarion 
Call gave coverage to a series of 
Spring parties unfortunately called 
the white arts festival. I find this 
label more than just unfortunate; 
such a name and the present struc- 
ture of these parties are racist in 
consequence. The Call article ac- 
knowledges the racist origins and 
exclusionary structure as a pre- 
judiced reaction to the cultural en- 
richment provided by events such as 
the Black Arts Festival; the purpose 
of so-called "white arts" as an event 
makes no pretense of enriching the 



intellectual life at CUP, but is de- 
fined in the article as a " week- 
long party for . . .(white) students, 

by (white) students.' "It is some 

fun for some students here at the 
expense of other CUP students. 

The origins of this type of "home- 
coming" are exclusionary and of- 
fensive to many here at CUP, what- 
ever the intentions of the present or- 
ganizers. It does not make the situ- 
ation acceptable for the few white 
students contacted by the Call to 
simply declare white arts to be inno- 
cent of racism; such an attitude is 
intentional or unintentional in- 
sensitivity. Because the organizers 
are "fond of the name" white arts 
and protest their fun-loving intent 
does not change the racist symbol- 
ism of the pvents of the week for me. 
The realities of a multi-ethnic 
campus community make a 
statement from the article that 
"there has never been a major crim- 
inal problem concerning White Arts 
Festival "a comfortable but ir- 
relevant concern. The "crime" 
against inclusion and human dignity 
is the problem of what the Call 
seems to condone by its coverage en- 
titled "White Arts Week starts." 

These parties are not "open to ev- 
eryone" as the Call article states, 
because of the barriers provided by 
the exclusionary name and organi- 
zational structure; there do not need 
to be "whites only" signs posted. 
There are plenty of t-shirts, often in- 
nocently worn, that help serve a seg- 
regative purpose — such is the 
nature of institutional racism. The 
CUP community has made and sus- 
tains so-called white arts week. 

We publicize it "as synonymous 
with Clarion University's spring 

gatherings " We must realize 

what we made in total effect. What 
we make we can change as good, 
truly educated, ethical citizens so as 
not to contaminate fun and release 
in the Spring for all members of the 
CUP community. 

Sincerely, 

Robert Girvan 

Sociology 



tranquility. 



Photo by Mike Bordo, Photography Editor 




flowers ^ Q^ft^ 



^s 



90 Merle S-'Jeet. Clarion. PA 16214 

Phone 226-7070 Ok 



^^^)<:£j^QC^ (^3j^^ 



4— THE CLARION CALL, Clarion, PA, Thursday, Sept. 17, 1987 



THE CLARION CALL, Clarion, PA, Thursday, Sept. 17, 1987-5 



Classified Ads 



Part-time Fun and Exciting Work. 

No Experience Necessary, we 

train. Must have 35nim Camera 

and a car. Call Eastern Phoito 

(412) 234-1671. 

Buy or Sell Avon for Christmas or 
anytime. Call 764-3464. 

Earn up to $5,000 next school year 
managing on-campus marketing 
programs for Top National Com- 
panies. Flexible, part-time hours. 
Must be a Junior, Senior, or Grad 
student. Call Yasmin 1-800-592- 
2121. 

The Brothers of PHI SIGMA KAPPA 

would like to thank the Sisters of 
PHI SIGMA SIGMA for a great 
mixer. 

FOR SALE: METAL WARDROBE 
CABINETS. Good Condition. 226- 
1863 or 849-4005 ( evenings ) . 



GOT SOMETHING 
TO SELL? 

LOOKING TO BUY? 

Nothing's 'classified' 
with us. 

Advertise in our 

weekiy classifieds 

20 words for 

only $1 

All ads should be dropped off 
at the Clarion Call Office, 1 
Harvey Hall. 



Foreign Study 

Behind Iron Curtain 



Five Clarion University 
students were among 22 
Americans who studied at 
Janus Pannonius University 
in Pecs, Hungary, this 
sunmier as part of an Indiana 
University of Pennsylvania 
exchange program. 

Included in the group were 
Nikki Cromis, a junior major- 
ing in early childhood educa- 
tion; Carrie Frances Myers, a 
1987 liberal arts graduate; Su- 
san DenieUe Gregg, a senior 
majoring in industrial rela- 
tions and political science; 
Maureen Sullivan, a senior 
majoring in English, and Val- 
erie Gatesman, a senior ma- 
joring in poUtical science and 



Russian. 

The first Americans to 
study at Janus Pannonius un- 
der the program, the group 
studied with Hungarian facul- 
ty on topics that included his- 
tory, law, language, film, vis- 
ual arts and archaeology. The 
Americans also visited loca- 
tions of historical significance. 

TTie program is the newest 
of lUP's international ex- 
change programs offering 
both students and faculty 
members opportunities to 
teach and study abroad. It is 
part of a statewide Consortium 
for International Education. 

(Courtesy of the lUP Office of Media 
Relations) 




Kin^s h, PSTENS 



SEE YOUR JOSTENS REPRESENTATIVE 

SEPTEMBER 21-22 

DATE 

BOOK CENTER 

PLACE 

Jostens coUege rmgs offered daily al your bookstore 



10:00-4:00 

TIME 




by Liz Koones 
News Editor 



Pennsylvania needs a seat belt 
law. Buckling up is now the law in 
24 states and the District of Co- 
lumbia. Pennsylvania currently 
has no proposed legislation for a 
seat belt law for adults. But chil- 
dren age one or under must ride 
in car seats and children ages one 
to four must wear a child re- 
straint if riding in the front seat 
of a car. So if children have to do 
it, why don't we? 

It would seem logical to have a 
seat belt law. Seat belts save 
lives. It is estimated that if every- 
one in the U.S. used them, 12,000 
lives and billions of dollars could 
be saved each year. According to 



the National Highway Traffic 
Safety Administration, users of 
safety belts sustained more 
minor injuries and fewer major 
or fatal injuries in crashes than 
non-users. 

In the six states where safety 
belt laws have been in effect the 
longest, fatalities have dropped 
10-26 percent. Every state sur- 
rounding Pennsylvania has a seat 
belt law. 

So there you have a few good 
reasons why the state should 
have a seat belt law. But until the 
state initiates a law, the choice is 
yours. But don't wait for a law, an 
accident or the loss of a loved one 
to make you think about wearing 
your seat belt. Take the initiative 
now and buckle up. 



Action in the PSAC 



The Pennsylvania State 
Athletic Conference (PSAC) 
enters its third weekend of 
play this Saturday, as two in- 
ter-divisional games, plus 10 
non-conference games dot 
the schedule. All 14 PSAC 
teams will be in action this 
Saturday. 

All games this weekend 
will be played on Saturday, 
with WEST CHESTER (2-0) 
traveling to Division I-AA 
Delaware in an interesting 
matchup. CHEYNEY (2-0) 
hosts Bowie State, EAST 
STROUDSBURG (1-0) hosts 
Montclair State, MILLERS- 
VILLE (1-0) travels to S. 
Connecticut, CALIFORNIA 
(1-1) visits Salem, CLARION 
(0-1) travels to Ferris State 
(Mi.) and EDINBORO (1-1) 
hosts Central Connecticut. 



DEPOSIT REQUIRED i 



VtSA' 



STUDENTS 
WELCOME! 

AT THE 

Church of 
Christ 

GRAND AVE.. CLARION 

(Up from Forest Manor) 

SUN. 

BIBLE CLASS 9:45a.m. 

MON. 

WORSHIP 10:30a.m. & 
6:00p.m. 

WED. 

BIBLE STUDY 7:30p.m. 

DAN SMITH 

Minister 
764-5268 



Two night games are also 
slated, with INDIANA (o-l) 
traveling to Division I-AA 
Towson State and MANS- 
FIELD (0-1) at Alfred. 

The two inter-divisional 
games on tap for this week- 
end show BLOOMSBURG (1- 
1) at LOCK HAVEN (1-1), 
with KUTZTOWN (0-2) at 
SHIPPENSBURG(O-l). 

West Chester University's 
Jason Sims was chosen as 
the PSAC-Eastern Division 
"Player of the Week," while 
the Western Division had 
"Co-Players," in Lock Ha- 
ven's Darrell Chavis and 
Slippery Rock's Rich Moskal. 
Tlie Play of the Week was 
turned in by Lock Haven's 
Duane Brown. 

West Chester University 
rolled to its second straight 
win, a 30-3 victory against 
American International. 
Sims, a 5-10, 165 lb., Ser. tail- 



back from Iselin, N.J., toted 
the pigskin 25 times for 272 
yards and two touchdowns in 
leading the Golden Rams to 
their win. 

Chavis, a 5-9, 165-pound, 
sophomore, tailback from 
Chester, Pa., helped Lock Ha- 
ven to their first win of the 
season. 

Moskal, a 5-10, 196-pound, 
junior, linebacker from Ster- 
ling, VA, led the Slippery 
Rock University defense in 
helping the Rockets post a 17- 
16 win at Central Connecticut. 

Brown, a 5-11, 220 pound, 
junior, defensive tackle from 
Leetsdale, Pa., made the big 
play in Lock Haven's 20-19 win 
at Muskingum. Brown broke 
through the line and blocked 
the Muskingum punt at the 11- 
yard line. 

(Story Courtesy of PSAC- 
SID, Rich Herman, C.U.P.) 



'GHU015ERVCK 



SPORTS CALENDAR 

SEPTEMBER 

18 Volleyball -Clarion Tournament 

19 Football at Ferris State 
Tennis at Indiana Invitational 
Men's X-Country at lUP Invitational 
Women's X-Country at Mansfield Invitational 
Volleyball - Clarion Tournament 

20 Tennis at Indiana Invitational 

Intramural rosters due for: flag football, Women's fall 
Softball, Men's & Women's golf and Women's Tennis 

22 Tennis vs. Westminster -3 p.m. 
Volleyball vs. lUP- 7 p.m. 

23 Men's and Women's X-Country vs. St. Bonaventure 4 p.m. 



Life.... 



(Continued from Page 2) 



It leaves me to wonder. . .how can man find the cure to many forms 
of cancer, and entirely put small pox to rest, yet fail to reserve the break- 
down of communication. 

as I said before though, prejudice is an individual problem. Human 
individuals are basically kind and helpful. You and I want peace. So 
there's hc^ yet. But it will not be one society after another declaring 
open mindedness. It will be you and I, then she, then he who will begin 
to give others a chance to show what they have to offer beft»ie the door 
is slammed in their faces. 




EWS 



High donor turnout expected 



by LuAnn Zeigler, 
News Staff Writer 



The American Red Cross 
will be holding its annual 
blood drive at Clarion Univer- 
sity's Tippin Gymnasium on 
Oct. 7, 1987. The drive is in- 



tended to help balance the 
existing blood supply avail- 
able to the public through the 
Red Cross. 

drive, there were two blood- 
mobiles and approximately 
384 people donated blood. 




GIVING HIS ALL. 
Activities Day. 



.The lead singer of "10 til Destiny" belts out a song at 
Photo by Mike Bordo, Photography Editor 



Housing changes 
fulfill student needs 



by Steve Ferringer, 
News Staff Writer 



Qarion University housing 
has recently undergone a bar- 
rage of changes. Of the new 
changes in the seven resi- 
dence halls, none seem as 
popular as the new designated 
floors for non-smoking, 
academics, quiet, graduates 
and special housing needs. 
Mr. Barry Morris, Director of 
Residence Life, said that now 
"needs are being fulfiUed." It 
is no longer just housing, but 
the students' needs are being 
catered to. 

This new trend seems to be 
working. Housing figures in- 
dicate that housing occupancy 
has increased over last year 
at this time, according to 
Morris. 

Another popular change 
was the addition of 90 nev. 
single rooms which are filled 
to capacity. Morris said, "It 
makes me think we'll keep 
them." 

Ttie new phone system has 
worked out well. New options 



such as call waiting, hold, con- 
ference calling, and calling 
cards which aUow every stu- 
dent to receive their own 
phone bill, have all met with a 
positive response. At this time 
the new system is encounter- 
ing problems with students 
not being able to receive di- 
rectory assistance, but they 
are currently working on the 
problem in the system. 

Another major change in 
housing is the signing of con- 
tracts for two semesters. The 
Housing Office has heard 
nothing from students about 
this new policy yet this semes- 
ter. However, Morris said that 
they "may get more reaction 
later." 

Since the implementation of 
the changes, the Housing 
Office has been listening to 
student feedback and plans to 
conduct a survey in the spring 
to monitor student opinions. 
For now, Morris feels confi- 
dent that the overall student 
population are finding the new 
changes satisfying their 
needs. 



Alpha Phi Omega and the uni- 
versity women sponsored the 
drive. The Alpha Sigma Tau 
sorority volunteered their 
time to help set up and clean 
up after the drive. UsuaUy 200 
pints of blood are donated to 
the Red Cross by Clarion 
University students during 
each blood drive. This year, 
the Red Cross will provide 
three bloodmobiles and the 
donor turnout is expected to 
be even greater than at last 
year's drive. Domino's Pizza 
will be providing pizza to add 
to the refreshments after a do- 
nation. 

TTie greatest demand is for 
people with "0" positive or 



negative blood, because it is 
the rarest of all blood types. 
People who have this type 
blood; most of the population 
has the type "0" positive. 

David R. Smith, Donor Re- 
source Consultant, is a con- 
sultant in blood services for 
the Johnstown region of Penn- 
sylvania. He stresses the 
importance of complete donor 
screening, especially now with 
the threat of AIDS (acquired 
immune deficiency syn- 
drome). One point Smith 
made was "that a person can- 
not get AIDS from donating 
blood. The needles and blood 
bags are sterile and are dis- 
carded after one use." He al- 



so commented that "smce 
March of 1985, all blood is test- 
ed for the AIDS antibody (HIV 
antibody) and also for other 
things present, such as hepa- 
titis." 

Donors are screened right 
away, eliminating any high- 
risk blood. Blood products to- 
6ay are very safe against any 
contamination. The blood is 
sent for testing in Johnstown. 
"We will not take the blood if it 
isn't safe for the donor, as well 
as, the recipient. Some donors 
may be turned away because 
they have low blood pressure 
or are on medication, not be- 
cause they have the AIDS 
virus." 



New computer lab opened 



by Tara Ramirez, 
News Staff Writer 



The Writing Center has re- 
cently opened a brand new 
Computer Lab stocked with 
Apple II GS computers. These 
computers will make up the 
Writmg Center Computer Lab 
in Carlson Library. 

The word-processing com- 
puters are accessible to any 
student interested in improv- 
ing their writing techniques. 

According to Dr. Lois I. 
Green, Director of the Writing 
Center, the new computers 
will act as an aid in getting 
students more involved with 
their writing. 

She hopes having the com- 
puters will help to make the 
writing process easier and wiU 
encourage people to write 
more. 

The computers were 
purchased last spring and 
were installed in August. The 
Computer Lab opened to all of 
the student body on Monday, 
Sept. 14. 



Monday: 

PITCHER 

NITE 



An annual student fund gen- 
erated by student fees paid for 
the computers. The money 
from the student fund is gen- 
erally used to buy something 
for the students. Green com- 
mented that the computers 
"really do belong to the stu- 
dents." 

Green is trying something 
new this semester. She and 
her staff are keeping the Com- 
puter Lab and Writing Center 
open during the evening 
hours. The hours for the new 
Computer Lab are Monday 



through Friday 2-4 and Mon- 
day through Thursday 6-8. The 
Writing Center hours are 
Monday through Thursday 10- 
4 and 6-8, on Friday the center 
is open from 10-3. 

The Computer Lab holds 16 
computers. There will usually 
be three tutors on staff in the 
room to help any questioning 
student. Th^ same tutors that 
staff the Writing Center will 
staff the Computer Lab. 

Students must have their 
Qarion I.D. and their own 5.25 
disc in order to use the lab. 



Sept. 18: 

Sept. 19: 

Sept. 21: 

Sept. 22: 

Sept. 18: 

Sept. 19: 

Sept. 20: 



CAMPUS CALENDAR 

ACADEMIC AND INFORMATIONAL 

Newman Association Orientation, Newman House, 7 p.m. 
University Women's Club newcomers and retirement recep- 
tion, Music Hall, 5 p.m. 
Policy Committee meeting, 140 Peirce, 4 p.m. 
Athletic Department "Time Out" luncheon, Holiday Inn, 12 noon 



ENTERTAINMENT 



Koinonia hayride, leaves Campbell Hall, 6:45 p.m. 

Clarion's Alternative Bar, Harvey Multi-Purpose room, 9:30 p.m. 

C.B. Movie "StandBy Me," Marwich-Boyd Aud., 8 p.m. 



Tuesday: 

MUG 

NITE 



Wednesday: 

SUPER 
CHEAP 

DRAFTS 

*From 7-9 p.m. w/Guitarist 

Thursday: 
CANADIAN 
NITE 



['UNIVERSITY inn:: 



Friday: 

BRING 
BACK 
YOUR 
MUG 

NITE 

Saturday: 

SUPER 
CHEAP 
DRAFTS 

•D.J. /No Cover 



6-THE C LARION CALL. Clarion. PA, Thursday, Sept. 17, 1987 

New bridge is 
well-received 



by Sharon Copper, 
News Staff Writer 



Construction of the long 
awaited Route 322 bridge on 
Riverhill was recently com- 
pleted by Cameron Construc- 
tion Company. The icing was 
put on the cake as the crew ap- 
plied the final coat of paint on 
Wednesday, Sept. 2. 



"Many people are glad 
about the bridge, espe- 
cially the truckers." 

—Dave Byers, 
Project Engineer 



The unusually nice summer 
weather allowed construction 
to be finalized earlier than the 
November deadline. Response 
to the bridge has been lavor- 
able. "Many people are glad 



about the bridge, especially 
the truckers," said Project 
Engineer, Dave Byers. 

Some Clarion residents 
helped determine the color of 
the bridge. In January the 
Clarion Chamber of Com- 
merce sponsored a contest 
with the area elementary 
school children topick a color 
for the bridge. "Tiie students 
had to select a color and write, 
in 25 words or less, why they 
chose that color for the 
bridge," said Tracy Sharrar, 
the Executive Secretary of the 
Clarion Chamber of Com- 
merce. Within three weeks the 
Vice President of the Cham- 
ber, Mrs. Barbara Hartle and 
Treasurer, Dave Morris se- 
lected MaryAnn Jones from 
over 300 applicants. As a re- 
sult, the bridge is red. The 
bridge is a welcome addition 
to Clarion area residents. 




r 



THE CLARION CALL, Clarion, PA, Thursday. Sept. 17, 1987-7 



NEW BRIDGE — The new Route 322 bridge, whose red color was chosen by an elementary school student, spans 
across the Clarion River. Photo by Mike Bordo, Photography Editor 



CORRECTION 



In the September 10 issue of the 
Clarion Call, two errors appeared 
in the front page Faculty/Wel- 
come Address article. Salary in- 
creases which appeared as "five 
and one-half percent in the first 
year, five percent in the second 
and five and one-half in the third" 
should read 5, 5, 5.5. Faculty 



raises which appeared as "All 
faculty who have served eight 
years or more will receive a five 
percent raise over the three 
years" should have read "all fac- 
ulty who have served eight years 
or more at step G (pay step) will 
receive " 



ALF Preview 



New events slated for festival 



by Robin Martin 
News Staff Writer 



The 34th Annual Autunm 
Leaf Festival is expected to 
attract another large turnout, 
according to the Clarion Area 
Chamber of Commerce Ex- 
ecutive Director Joseph W. 



.^; 



proudly introduce 



the 



GYRO SPECIAL 

Starting Sept. 17 

Gyro, Med. Pop 

only $2.50 

LOOK: Spaghetti Night Coming Up. 



Dombrock. There are a num- 
ber of new additions to this 
year's schedule; among them 
are the Antique Show and Sale 
consisting of genuine antiaue 
items, and Air Craft Rides 
being given at the Clarion 
County Airport. A 10- 
kilometer race, sponsored by 
the United Way, is also a part 
of the Autunm Leaf Festival 
events. 

Traditional activities of the 
festival include the pop^ular 
parade and street carnival. 
These areas have been im- 
proved in their variety and at- 
tractiveness. There will be an 
increase in the number of 
concession booths from 18 to 
23, resulting in a broadening of 
the food available. 

"Volunteers" is the theme 
for the floats in this year's 
parade. An expectancy of up 
to 150 units will be awaiting re- 
view by thousands of spec- 
tators. The increase in parade 



units is due to the increased 
number in float and band en- 
tries. 

The traditional Miss Teen 
ALF Pageant has been moved 
to the Clarion Area High 
School with reserved seating 
only. This is the 19th year of 
the pageant and is expected to 
be a quick sell-out. 

Other features will include 
the popular Air Band Compe- 
tition and the many craft 
showcases displayed through- 
out the week. ALF week be- 
gins Sept. 26 and continues 
through Oct. 4. 

HOMECOMING QUEEN 

OR COURT 

All women who are going to run 
for homecoming queen or court pick 
up application in 108 Riemer Center. 
Deadline: 4:30 p.m. on Sept. 18. 

APPLICATIONS 

The University Center Board is 
accepting applications for all com- 
mittees. Applications and informa- 
tion available in 108 Riemer. 



CLARION CINEMAS 



GARBY 226-8521 



MA^A^SUN.IrOO 

STAKEOUT 

7:30 & 9:30 
MAT. 1:00 P.M. 



HOUSE II 
7:30 & 9:30 

MAT. 1:00 P.M. 



ORPHEUM 226-7010 



Ma t. Sat. & Sun. 3K)0 

THE BIG EASY 

7:30 ONLY 

NO WAY OUT 

9:30 
MAT. 3:00 



FOURTH PROTOCAL 

7:30 & 9:30 

MAT. 3:00 



DOWNSTAIRS, RIEMER 
226-2406 



BARGAIN NITE: 

MON.&TUES. 

ALL SEATS $2.50 

FREE POPCORN COUPON 



i 



Student Senate ^ 

No more winter grad ceremony? 



by Suzanne Halleman, 
News Staff Writer 



The reaction was negative, 
at Uie Student Senate meeting 
Tuesday, when a suggestion 
was made to the senators to 
consider the canceUation of 
winter commencement exer- 
cises for students graduating 
in December. The reason for a 
considered cancellation is be- 
cause of declining student par- 
ticipation. 

Also discussed was the 
problem of registration being 
the same day as the first day 
of classes. Students either 
stand in line to register and 
pSy tuition or they go to class. 
A possible solution was pre- 
sented; either start classes on 
Tuesday or have the offices 
open earlier. 

A new committee was form- 
ed to act as an advisory of stu- 
dent needs in Riemer. The 
title of this new organization is 
Student Centers. The com- 
mittee consists of five sena- 
tors, one of which will act as 
chairperson. The senators 
nominated are Paula Pall, 



Bernard Dhas, Bill Kapalka, 
and Sean Dalton. There is one 
position still open. Ttie sena- 
tors will work and Dave Tom- 
eo, Director of Student 
Centers, and Hal Wassink, Ad- 
visor of Student Activities. 

Under the Procreations 
committee, a motion was 
made to allocate $123.10 from 
tiie capital fund to tiie Associa- 
tion of U.S. Army to pay for 
parts for show rifles which are 
to be used in the homecoming 
parade. 

A motion was also passed to 
allocate $600 to a returning 
committee. The Social Econo- 
mic Association had been 
inactive for the past two 
years. They are now becom- 
ing active with 40 members. 
They want to get Congress- 
man Qinger andf an Ambassa- 
dor for Kuwait to speak at the 
campus. 

Committees on Committees 
reported that applications for 

Eositions on the advisory 
oard and on the conduct 
board are due October 1 . 

Under Elections committee, 
the petitions for senate elec- 



tions will be out October 7, due 
back October 28, and the vot- 
ing will take place November 
9, 10, and 11. 

A suggestion was made to 
see if lights could be construc- 
ted around the basketball court 
to enable night playing. Mimi 
Benjamin, the new student 
trustee, will look into the mat- 
ter. 

At last week's Student Sen- 
ate meeting. Dr. Curtis dis- 
cussed the Alcohol Policy 
booklets. "It is basically the 
same policy as always at Clar- 
ion," he said. 

Under ttie Food and Hous- 
ing committee; new trays, ta- 
ble cloths, and silverware 
holders were purchased for 
Chandler. Eventually they 
wish to get microwave ovens. 
The possibility for a fruit bar 
and juice at all meals is being 
considered for next semester. 

Under the Rules and Regu- 
lations committee, tiie ways 
that new organizations are be- 
ing recognized needs to be re- 
viewed. Phil Popielski and 
Bernard Dhas will review the 
matter. 




DOWN WITH THE OLD. 
Sept. 14 around 1 p.m. 



A piece of the old Rt. 322 bridge lies in the river. The bridge was removed by explosion on 

PhotobyMikeBordo, Photography Editor 



COLLEGIO'S 

ITALIAN RESTAURANT 



TUES. & SAT. SPECIAL 

LARGE PIZZA 
$3.99 

5-close 
No Delivery on Specials 



16" 
Plain 



PHONE: 226-5421 



Italian Hoagie *2.30 

Ham & Provolone . . 2.00 

Plus a Delicious Variety 

of Hot Sandwiches 
and Much, Much More 

FREE DELIVERY 
11A.M. CLOSE 



I 



518 MAIN STREET 
226-5421 



WORK FOR YOURSELF 



As a campus representative 
you'll be responsible for placing 
advertising materials on bulletin 
tx>ards and working on 
marketing programs for clients 
sucti as American Express, 
Boston University, Eurall, and 
various movie companies, 
among others. Part-time work, 
cfioose your own hours. No 
sales. Many of our reps stay 
with us long after graduation. If 
you are self-motivated, hard- 
working, and a bit of an 
entrepreneur, call or write for 
more Informatton to: 

AMERICAN PASSAGE 

NETWORK 

621 1 W. HOWARD STREET 

CHICAQO, IL 60648 

1(800) 221-5M2 or 

(312) 647- 60 60 

CHICAQO DALLAS LOS ANQELBS 

NEW YORK SEATTLE 



RED STALLION 

f £ 

Cpc^'^^' A ladles night out with ^^t/ 

• * •THEMEN * * * 

ALL MALE DANCE SHOW 
TUESDAY, SEPT. 22 

Bring this coupon and pay only $3.00 cover 



T 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 



»QUS£ 



522 Main St 
226-8222 



prwE -^ 




DtkfiiB0t9 



GET ACQUAINTED OFFER 

20% off DINNER 



8 People 

Per Coupon 

Limit 



Valid ID for 

Each Student 

Required 



Coupon Good 

ONLY 

5-9 p.m. 

7 days a week 

until Sept. 30 



Students asked to 
affirm eligibility 



by Liz Koones, 
News Editor 



This fall, all student em- 
ployees hired between Nov. 7, 
1986 and May 31, 1987, must af- 
firm their eligibility for em- 
ployment, by order of the 
Immigration and Naturaliza- 
tion Service (INS). This is ac- 
complished by filling out the 
INS form 1-9. 

The Form 1-9 has been de- 
veloped for verifying that per- 
sons are eligible to work in the 
United States. Persons hired 
after May 31, 1987 must com- 

Elete the form within three 
usiness days of the date of 
hire. Persons hired between 
the above dates must have 
completed the form before 
September 1. 

Any employee who falls into 
those categories must provide 
documents to verify both his 
identity and employment 
eligibility. Documents that 



can be used are a U.S. Pass- 
port, a certificate of U.S. cit- 
izenship, a state issued photo 
drivers license, school identi- 
fication card with a photo, or a 
voter's registration card. The 
employee handbook that con- 
tains the Form 1-9 lists all 
documents that will be accept- 
ed. 

During the first year of im- 
plementation (June 1, 1987 to 
May 31, 1988) the INS will con- 
tinue to assist employers in 
complying with the law. The 
INS will only issue a citation 
for first violations. Further 
violations during this period 
may result in penalties. 

Employment is often the 
magnet that attracts persons 
to come to or stay in the U.S. 
illegally. The purpose of the 
new law is to remove the mag- 
net by requiring employees to 
hire only citizens and aliens 
who are authorized to work in 
the U.S. 



CLARION VIDEO CENTER 

11 S. SIXTH AVENUE 
CLARION, PA 16214 

COMING SOON 

PAPERBACK HERO 9/11 HOOSIERS 9/14 

MANNEQUIN 9/18 BURGLAR 9/21 

Some Kind of Wonderful BLIND DATE 9/23 

9/21 Had ley's Rebellion 9/26 
ANGEL HEART ....9/26 

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THE CLARION CALL, Clarion, PA, Thursday, Sept. 17, 1987-9 



8-THE CLARIOfJ CALL, Clarion, PA, Thursday, Sept. 17, 1987 



AIDS victim leaves school 



A 12 year old boy infected with the 
AIDS virus was withdrawn from 
public school by his parents — amid 
protests and threats of violence. 

After the second day of class at a 
Lake City, Tenn. school, Jimmy and 
Norma Mowery told school officials 
they wanted a home tutor for their 
son School Superintendent Terry 
Weober said, "I did not coerce the 
Mowerys. . it was their decision to 
make." 

ABORTION 

A measure to require a girl to get 
parental or court consent before she 
can have an abortion won final 
legislative approval in California. 
Governor George Deukmejian is ex- 
pected to sign it into law. The Su- 



FROM 

ALL 

POINTS 




preme Court has yet to rule on the 
measure, but Federal courts have 
struck down similar laws in Georgia 
and Minnesota. 

FIRES 

Hundreds of thousands of acres of 
forests are being consumed by fires 
in California and Oregon. Major pro- 
gress has been made in California's 
Mendocino National Forest and 
Hawaii's Volcanoes National Park. 
But a new fire in Cleveland National 
Forest near Los Angeles could take 
days to control. A new aid for the 
firefighters is a specially equipped 
NASA jet providing a view of 10,800 
square miles of California fire 
areas. 




DOING HIS DUTY. 



An unwilling ROTC nnember gets a camoflage tacial at Activities Day. 

Photo by Frank Lotito, Staff Pf)otograpfier 



Hearings scheduled at CUP 



by Liz Koones, 
News Editor 



A congressional subcom- 
mittee is coming to Clarion on 
September 21 for a hearing to 
determine whether federal 
and state laws may have been 
harmful to Pennsylvania's 
surface coal mining industry. 

The House Subcommittee 
on Environment, Energy and 
Natural Resources, along with 
Representative Bill Qinger of 
Pennsylvania's 23rd District, 
will hold the hearing in Carter 
Auditorium of StUl Hall at 10 
a.m. 

According to Clinger, at the 
hearing we will allow Pennsyl- 
vania residents and officials 
representing the rullrange of 
views on coal mining, an op- 
portunity to voice their con- 
cerns directly to members of 
Congress who are responsible 
for federal surface mining 
law. 

T^e Surface Mining Control 
and Reclamation Act of 1977 
spells out minimum environ- 
mental protection standards 
and requires that underground 
and surface mine operators 



clean up mining sites when 
they are finished. 

Clinger said the congres- 
sional hearing in Clarion is in- 
tended to identify areas where 
the federal and state oversight 
of the coal program has fallen 
short and where the federal- 
state overlap has actually 
proved counterproductive to 



environmental concerns, the 
coal industry and the state. 

Witnesses expected to testi- 
fy at the hearing will include 
representatives from the en- 
vironmental community, the 
coal industry, the Pennsylva- 
nia Department of Environ- 
mental Resources, among 
others. 



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Hazing law 
made stronger 



by Vonda Swarts, 
News Staff Writer 



A new hazing law has come 
into effect this fall. The law 
concerning initiations into or- 
ganizations states that "any 
action or situation" that could 
lead to physical or mental 
harm to the pledges is illegal. 

The Pennsylvania General 
Assembly passed the new law 
last spring. When asked what 
this new law would mean to 
Qarion's Greek organizations, 
Dave Tomeo, University Cen- 
ters Du-ector, repjlied, "It will 
mean the organizations will 
need to use more common 
sense 



>> 



Computer detects responses 

College includes the depart- 
ments of Education, Health 
and Physical Education, Field 
Services, Secondary Edu- 
cation, Special Education, and 
Speech Pathology and Audio- 
logy. 

Hetrick has always been 
able to work in research with 
his teaching and administra- 
tive duties at Qarion Univer- 
sity. His professional activi- 
ties are reflected in numerous 
publications, professional and 
academic association mem- 
berships, and presentations at 
national and statewide confer- 
ences. 



Clarion University acting 
dean of the College of Educa- 
tion and Human Services Den- 
nis Hetrick knows how people 
feel when they visit his office. 
He has a computer that can 
measure their response to cer- 
tain situations. 

"Hie computer, connected to 
an electroencephalograph, is 
used by Hetrick wiUi volun- 
teers in his research in bi- 
sensory responses. The con- 
tinuation of his research in 
this field was part of the un- 
derstanding between Hetrick, 
chairman of the Speech Path- 
ology and Audiology Depart- 



ment since 1978, and the ad- 
ministration when he ac- 
cepted the position of acting 
dean of the College of Edu- 
cation and Human Services. 

Continued research will be 
one small part of Hetrick's 
new duties facing him this 
year. 

"I'm excited about the chal- 
lenge of the position this 
year," said Hetrick. "The Col- 
lege has been developing ex- 
cellence in academic and clin- 
ical offerings and I am looking 
forward to any contributions I 
can make and continuing the 
tradition of excellence." The 



The law isn't a new one for 
Qarion, only a stronger one. 
According to Tomeo, Qarion 
has only had one proveable in- 
cident of hazing in the last se- 
ven years. The law makes 
hazing a criminal misconduct, 
and mH probably reduce the 
incidents of hazing altogether. 

Anyone who is caught 
involved in an act of hazing 
has to deal with the state of 
Pennsylvania and the univer- 
sity. According to the law, 

"Hazing is punishable by a 

year's imprisonment" along 
with the authorization of the 
universities and colleges "to 
suspend, expel, or fine 
students who engage in 
hazing, and to withhold grades 
and diplomas to compel pay- 
ment of fines." The hazing law 
is stated in the student rights 
and regulations handbook. 

Any incidents of hazing can 
be reported to the Director of 
Greek affairs, Diane Ander- 
son, Public Safety or to 
Student Affairs. 

SiS DOWN 

The Student Information System 
(SIS will not be available during a 
five day period from 8:30 a.m. Thurs- 
day, Sept. 17 through Monday, Sept. 
21. The NEW SIS version will be in- 
stalled during this time. 

SINGERS WANTED 

The Qarion University Concert 
Choir and Madrigal Singers are ac- 
cepting singers at this time. Anyone 
interested should contact Mr. Lazich 
at 2384. 







FEATURES 



CUP creates a link with Ireland 



by Maria Kapsak 
Features Editor 



Coming to a different coun- 
try for the first time could be 
very frightening - for some 
people. This wasn't the case 
for Dr. Desmond BeU. When 
he came over to the states he 
found that Ireland, his native 
country, is much like the Uni- 
ted States: the television 
shows, rock music and 
various other aspects. 

When I talkedwith Dr. Bell, 
he struck me as a gentle, kind- 
hearted man. He told me 
about his family of five: his 
\dfe, who is Scottish, a set of 
twin boys who are seven, and 
another boy who is 10 months 
old. Besides being a husband 
and father, he is currently a 
professor at NIHE (National 
Institute of Higher Education) 
located in Dublin, Ireland. He 
decided to make his first trip 
to the United States, specifi- 
caUy CUP, to join with his 
friend, Dr. Kelly Ainsworth, 
director of international stu- 
dies here at Clarion. The two 
met in Ireland when Dr. Ains- 
worth visited NIHE. 

Friendship is not the only 
reason Dr. Bell came across 
the Atlantic from Ireland. He 



also had intentions of showing 
Clarion students a document- 
ary entitled "We'll Fight and 
No Surrender! Ulster Loyal- 
ism and the Protestant Sense 
of History. " As Dr. Ainsworth 
put it, "I am delighted that 
several hundred Qarion stu- 
dents had the opportunity 
to view Desmond Bell's pro- 
vacative video and listen to his 
keen commentary on northern 
Ireland." Bell gave presen- 
tations about Ireland to 
various different classes on 
campus during his stay in 
Clanon. 

llie tape involves the Pro- 
testant and Catholic denomi- 
nations, the former being the 
dominant. This all takes place 
in northern Ireland. Bell skill- 
fully shows all the different 
sides of Ireland: entertain- 
ment, violence and the most 
unportant aspect, the relig- 
ious struggle between Protest- 
ants andCatholics. He por- 
trays a neutral view through- 
out the documentary as to 
what actually went on in 
northern Ireland. Dr. Bell 
feels the United States should 
be informed as to what is hap- 
pening, or did happen, in other 
countnes. 



One way of keeping each 
other informed is to develop 

close ties with one another. 
This is exactly what CUP and 
NIHE is trying to do. Dr. Ains- 
worth stated, "We have an in- 
formal agreement with the 
NIHE, Dublin (Republic of 
Ireland) which has led to stu- 
dent exchanges and faculty 
visits. We expect that these in- 
formal relations will continue 
and strengthen during the 
coming years. Certainly co- 
operation is in the interest of 
both institutions." Ainsworth 
feels that if Ireland and the 
CUP team up together, every- 
one will be that much more 
knowledgeable. For example 
at NIHE, the communication 
field focuses more on the the- 
oretical aspects of television. 
Whereas in the United States 
we tend to lean more towards 
the technological advance- 
ments of television. By com- 
bining the talents, both coun- 
tries wiU benefit from it. 

Although Dr. Desmond 
Bell's visit was a short one, he 
certainly made a lasting im- 
pression. He has plans of vis- 
iting many more cities in the 
states before he returns home 
to Deny, Ireland. 




FIRST VISIT TO THE STATES. . . Dr. Desmond Bell showed many CUP stu- 
dents his documentary on northern Ireland. Pfiotoby Mike Bordo. 

Photography Editor 



Speeldeel "Ihna " dazzlesCUP 




DAZZLING ENTERTAINMENT. . . Dancers entertained the Clarion campus on Tuesday night. 



by Lisa Zeljak, 

Features Staff Writer 

The dance and Speeldeel 
"Dina" from Erlangen took 
the stage Tuesday night at 7 
o'clock in the Marwick-Boyd 
Au(tttorium. If you missed the 
show you might ask, who or 
what is the dance Speedeel 
"Dina"? It is one of the best 
folklore ensembles of the Fed- 
eral Republic of Germany. 
Their program is comprised 
of old German folk culture and 
guild dances, of folk melodies, 
and above all, of dance pot- 
pourris. Like the dances, the 
music is lively, fast pace and 
very entertaining. 

The Dance and Speedell 
"Dina" was founded in 1972 
and since that time has ap- 
peared in many cities in Ger- 
many and has undertaken a 
series of performance tours 
abroad. They have toured the 
U.S.A., Poland, Sweden, South 
Africa, France, Mexico, and 
are adding to the list. Nation- 
aUy televised performances 
are also added to their long 
list of credits. They have even 
been invited to appear on well 
known television shows such 
as "Siempre Domingo" in 



Mexico, the "Elaine Coole 
Show" and the "German 
Speeldeel Night," both are tel- 
evision shows of Canada. 

The ensemble is made up of 
very talented amateur per- 
formers who make many sac- 
rifices, both financially and in 
terms of ideals. 

They each provide their own 
costumes which cost between 
$250 to $500, not including the 
embroidery which is done by 
the members themselves. 
They spend two days a week 
training and in the winter ad- 
ditional time on the weekends. 
Eike Halnal is their artistic di- 
rector, who has also been 
honored with several cultural 
prizes for his choreography 
and for his discovery and re- 
construction of ancient 
German dances. 

"There are many people 
with a German heritage, but 
so little of German culture is 
offered," said Dr. Kluesener a 
German professor here at 
Clarion. 

The performance helped de- 
crease the lack of German 
culture and offered an enter- 
taining experience not many 
of us, who attended, will ever 
forget. 



10— THE CLARION.CALL, Clarion, PA, Thursday, Sept. 17, 1987 



THE CLARION CALL, Clarion, PA, Thursday, Spet. 17, 1987—1- 



Senior Spotlight 



Campus Ctose-Up... IVIichaelL.Shenl( 



by Kellie Acquaro, 
Features Staff Writer 



Carlisle, Pennsylvania has 
produced one of Clarion's 
most prominent seniors, 
Mike L. Shenk. At age 20 Mike 
nas a multitude of goals set 
for his life after Clarion. 

Mike comes from a family 
of four. Mom, Dad, his sister 
Melissa, age 26, and himself. 
Mike explained that his 
family is very close, 
especially after he went to 
college. While attending Car- 
lisle High School, he played 
drums for his marching band 
and also was a member of 
the tennis team. 

Here at Clarion Mike is 
involved with many on and 
off campus organizations. 
Mike is a math computer sci- 
ence major and has retained 
a QPA of 3.8. He belongs to 
Phi Eta Sigma and Pi Mu Ep- 
silon which are a National 
Honors Fraternity and a Nat- 
ional Math Fraternity re- 
spectively. Mike has also 
contributed his musical 
talents to our University. He 
performed in CUP's march- 
ing band in his freshman 
year and also in the jazz band 
for two years. As a junior and 
senior he has worked in the 
tutoring center, helping oth- 
ers. 

Finally and most import- 
ant to Mike is his involve- 



ment with ROTC. He is both 
Cadet Lieutenant Colonel 
and Battalian Commander. 
Mike receives a full scholar- 
ship from the ROTC pro- 
gram. This scholarship start- 
ed in his sophomore year. 
Mike believes that "Being in 
ROTC develops leadership 
skills, not just in the mili- 
tary. . .to know something 
about leadership does a lot 
for you." Mike also com- 
mands the Pershing Rifles 
which is an Honorary Mili- 
tary fraternity on campus. 
The Pershing Rifles is a com- 
munity service society. They 
have a pledge period which 
emphasizes physical 
training. The Pershing Rifles 
are known on campus by 
their black berets. The AUSA 
(Association United States 
Army), is another one of 
Mike's military activities. 

Biking, running and repel- 
ling are a few of Mike's hob- 
bies. His smile shows that 
being airborne is probably 
his favorite hobby of all. He 
has six jumps at 2,000 feet 
credited to his name. His 
most recent jump was just 
this past July. Mike attended 
airborne school in the sum- 
mer of 1986. He also attended 
The Camp All American, 
which is basic training for 
army officers. This was held 
in Fort Bragg, N.C. "Home 



of the 82nd airborne." This 
lasted six weeks and he went 
with 21 other Clarion ROTC 
members. One specific jump 
Mike remembers well is 
when he landed in a swamp 
in Georgia. He said, "I got 
out as fast as I could." His in- 
structor yelled at him for five 
minutes then made him 
"beat his boots", a type of 
calisthenics. Mike was just 
glad to be out of the swamp. 

Mike's future plans include 
the army as a definite ca- 
reer. After Clarion he hopes 
to be on active duty in Fort 
Rutgers, Alabama attending 
Officer Basic Course and 
Flight School. Flying attack 
helicopters is what he wants 
to go into. He also plans to 
get his masters in math and 
computer science while in 
the army. Mike explained 
that, "The rigor of learning 
mathematics helps thought 
processes in the ability to 
understand the technical as- 
pects; it also helps a lot with 
instrumentation and know- 
ledge of aeronautics." 

One of Mike's goals is to 
become Full Bird Colonel at 
the end of his first 11 months. 
Through the years he will go 
through an initial training 
period then into advanced 
training and next to OAC, 
Officer Advance Course. 

The army as a profession 




MICHAEL L. SHENK 

Photo by Mike Bordo, Photography Editor 



for Mike will be hard work is ready to accept the chal- 
and take many years, but he lenge. Mike stated, "In the 

military someone is always 



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watching and you are con- 
stantly under evaluation 
which makes you work 
harder; you have to love re- 
sponsibility. I am challenged 
every day and I know I will 
be directly responsible for 
other people's welfare. ' ' 

If you pass Mike on 
campus you will notice his 
head held up high and a big 
smile on his face. Although 
Mike Shenk knows that the 
army, is a profession, he also 
takes pride in knowing that 
he has taken on a big respon- 
sibility in defending his 
country. 




by Susan Daniels, 
Features Staff Writer 






Recently I had the pleasure 
of talking with a new faculty 
member of the SCT depart- 
ment, Mr. Christian Faust. 

Mr. Faust is an assistant 
professor in the SCT depart- 
ment. He teaches all of the 
dance technique classes, and 
also a special topics class en- 
titled "Audition 

Techniques." 

Mr. Faust was born in 
Cleveland, Ohio in 1953. His 
interest in theatre started in 
elementary school, where he 
staged and often starred in 
his own plays. When he was 
in high school, he was very 
active on the gymnastics 
team, and, in fact, won many 
medals. Upon his graduation 
from high school, he was not 

Suite sure what he wanted to 
from there, so he obtained 
a job as assistant manager in 
a bookstore. It was at this 
time his interest in dance and 
choreography arose. When 
asked what exactly 
prompted his interest he re- 
plied, "One day I physically 
ran into a girl and thought to 
myself, 'I haven't had a date 
in a while.' So I went to ballet 
classes to try and run into 
her again!" He found ballet 
classes to be "just as good as 
gymnastics, with the added 
dimension of music." At this 
time, Mr. Faust's life 
consisted of working at the 
bookstore everyday, and 
then taking two hours worth 
of dance classes six nights a 
week. At the age of 20, he de- 
cided to pursue his interest in 
dance even further, and also 
thought it would be a sensible 
idea to obtain a college de- 
gree. He went with his baller- 
ina partner to the University 
of Utah in Salt Lake City. Be- 
cause of his extremely high 
intelligence, he was able to 
finish undergraduate school 
in two years. He then went on 
to graduate school at Indiana 
University in Bloomington. 
He also excelled there, so 
much that the dean made 
him a member of the faculty 

Ask Ann Frances 

Having a problem? Looking for an 
answer? Need advice, but you don't 
want to malte a long distance call to 
your mom. Ask me, Ann Frances. I 
know all of you, but you do not know 
me. I can help, when you are un- 
sure what to do or say in a situation. 

When you want advice, have a 
gripe or complaint, and you would 
really feel better if you got something 
off your chest. Send me a letter at 105 
lUemer, c/o Ann Frances, Clarion 
CaU. 

Your name will not be published, 
but must be submitted with your let- 
ter. No problem is too big or too 
small, so come on and write to Ann 
Frances. 

Looking forward to hearing 
from you, 

^Gm Frances 



Introducing Mr. christian Faust 



as associate dance instructor 
even before he obtained his 
master's degree. It was at In- 
diana University where he 
met his wife of three years, 
Isabelle Rio-Faust, who was 
a French teacher there. 

After completing his 
master's degree, he did some 
additional study at Ohio 
State University and the Uni- 
versity of Michigan in mo- 
dem dance. This experience 
confirmed the fact that ballet 
was his true passion. 

From there, he and his 
wife moved to Florida and 
taught dance there. Although 
he did not particularly like 
teaching in Florida because 
he found the students to be 
extremely lazy and disinter- 
ested in class, he and his wife 
made quite an achievement 
in Florida. They created 
their own television series on 
the skills of basic ballet, bas- 
ed on a concept that they 
originated themselves. The 
series is in fact still being 
shown today. At this point, 
Mr. Faust can also be credit- 
ed for having appeared in 
two commercials for the 
American Heart Association. 

Mr. Faust and his wife then 
moved to Virginia to again 
teach dance classes. But he 
claims that people in 
Virginia are stubborn and 
simply not ready for 
changes, and soon he grew 
very tired of the South. 

Now we are fortunate 
enough to have Mr. Faust 
here at Qarion. His impres- 
sive academic background 
and extensive professional 
background make him the 
ideal man for the job. When 
asked what he enjoys the most 
about his job, he quickly re- 
plied, "The students and their 
wiUingness and eagerness to 
learn. He finds Clarion to be 
a very friendly school in gen- 
eral. He sa5^ the most chal- 
lenging class to teach is the 
aumtion techniques class be- 
cause he claims that much 
success in auditions is based 
on luck, and trying to train 
people to utilize craft as an ac- 
tor, singer, or dancer in a 
short period of time is diffi- 
cult. Mr. Faust's favorite 



class to teach is ballet/jazz be- 
cause, as he says about danc- 
ing, "That's my joy. I have a 
good time." 

When asked what improve- 
ments he would make in his 
job, he says he would like 
more access to a word pro- 
cessor, and there is progress 
being made on that request. 
He would also like a room to 
teach his dance classes in 
which is equipped with mir- 
rors, but understands that the 
chapel is being renovated and 
when it is done he will then 
have access to a room with 

When asked about his fam- 
ily, Mr. Faust said that he is 
the only blonde, blue-eyed 
member of his family and the 
only one of the clan involved in 
the arts. But his parents 
and older sister and younger 
brother have always been 
very encouraging and suppor- 
tive of him. 

Mr. Faust is a person who 
incorporates the arts into 
every aspect of his life. During 
his spare time, he enjoys 
choreographing and listening 
to classical and rock music. 
His favorite rock groups 
include such well-known and 
unknown names as Frank 
Zappa, Penguin Cafe Orches- 
tra, The Residents, The Art of 
Noise and Lauri Anderson. 
This vegetarian also has a 
passion for eating extensively 
during his free time. 

Knowing all of these given 
facts about Mr. Faust, one can 
make many assumptions 
about him. Indeed he is a dili- 
gent, intelligent man who is 
wholeheartedly dedicated to 
the arts. But Who is Mr. Faust 
really? Well, I decided to ask 
him. When asked to describe 
himself and his personality, he 
replied, "I've been described 
as possessing merciless so- 
briety. I possess a high degree 
of concentration. I am a pro- 
fessional, expecting profes- 
sionalism." 

So what is this professional's 

advice to the SCT majors? 
After a few very thou^tful 
moments, Mr. Faust advised, 
"Use eveiTthing as theatre 
material. Study your fellow 
students, study your teachers, 
of course study your aca- 



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MR. CHRISTIAN FAUST 

Photo by Steve McAninch, Staff Photographer 



demies. Don't be afraid to use 
something you've seen as a 
characterization." 

Although the position that 
Mr. Faust holds is only for one 
year, I'm sure we'll be seeing 
very much of him, as he has 
many plans for the inmiediate 
future. He would like to do 
more choreography and is 
even now trying to work 
through the details of starting 
a dance company here at 
Clarion, although no definite 
plans have been made as of 
now. He will also take total 
responsibility for choreograph- 



ing the musical planned for 
the spring, "Cabaret." 

I found my interview with 
Mr. FAust to be a pleasure. 
He was very cooperative in 
answering my numerous 
questions, extremely straight- 
forward, and in general, en- 
joyable to talk to. In closing 
our lengthy discussion, I ask- 
ed Mr. Faust what his ulti- 
mate goal was. Being the 
dedicated and aggressive man 
that he is, he simply replied, 
"To be comfortably rich. If I 
can teach one student some- 
thing, that's an achievement." 



Shear Artistry 

ON THE CORNER OF 8th & MAIN 



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PHONE: 226-6100 




12-THE CLARION CALL, Clarion, PA, Thursday. Sept. 17, 1987 



Roving Reporter Asks: 



What do you want to see at CUP 








Tom Leitch 
Post Graduate, Business Major 
U2, The Grateful Dead. 



Ciaran Lesikar, 
Sr., Special Ed. Major 
Genesis Just Genesis. 



Questions by Peggy Meister, Features Writer 



Julia Scheel, 
Jr. Communication Major 
Led Zeppelin, but they've broken 
up. . .Jimmy Paige or The Firm. 



Dana Takach ~ Jonathan Dreher, 

Soph., Communication Major Fr., Humanities 

The Rolling Stones, U-2, The Ra- New Order or The Smiths. 

mones or Megadeth. 

Photos by Mike Bordo, Photography Editor 



THE BUDGETING 



GOURMET 



by Angela Covelli 






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PASTA SALAD SUPREME 

Another year comes along and it is time once again to start cooking. 
No, this has absolutely nothing to do with your scope. I mean food! Real 
food, slightly aback from gourmet dishes and snacks. Fast and easily 
prepared foods are a must and I am simply going to share a few of them 
with you this year. 

Just don't start whining that you can't cook. You're in college right? 
So you certainly must be able to read. If you can't read, identify yourself, 
this I have to see. So don't be a wimp and read on to good taste. 

All of you out there who like pasta and also have it in the old taste 
buds for salad, will be in heaven with this one. 

The cook is the only person who has to know how easy this concoction 
really is . I '11 keep it a secret if you will . 

Run out and grab a few of these ingredients: 

V2 lb. LInguini, spaghetti or pasta noodles $ -25 

1 medium tomato 28 

1 medium cucumber 3^ 

1 V4 tsps. Salad Supreme (a seasoning) 23 

1/4 cup Italian salad dressing -25 

Total ^I^S 

Boil the pasta, and drain the water. Put the pasta in a medium size 
bowl. Chop the tomato and cucumber into pieces and add this to the pasta. 
Then add salad dressing and salad supreme. Mix extremely well. Serve as a 
side dish or main course. 

This dish is nutritious yet tasty. Leftover pasta is delictable right out of 
the fridge. 

If you are a vegetable person diced carrots, green peppers and/or black 
olives may be added for variety. Onion lovers may wish to toss in a small bit 
of diced onion for extra pungent flavor. 



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colloq. 


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15 Dad's partner 


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44 Oriental nurse 


18 Rocky hill 

19 Printer's 


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47 Ordinance UZ-Z- t/ 


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20 Part of window 


51 Be in debt 


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23 Myself 


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24 Small island 


57 Declares 


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Center Board 

Students make 
things happen 



THE CLARION CALL, Clarion, PA, Thursday, Sept. 17, 1987—15 



by Kimberly Harkless 
Features Staff Writer 



What kind of outrageous 
student activities will Clarion 
University come up with this 
year? That question can only 
be answered by the Clarion 
University students them- 
selves. Students who wish to 
voice their ideas concerning 
the topic of student activities 
are urged to get involved with 
the University Center Board. 

'Hie Center Board is an ad- 
ministrative organization 
designed to provide the 
Clarion University campus 
community with entertaining, 
recreational, and educational 
activities. It is the Center 
Board who is responsible for 
some of our most enjoyable 
campus activities such as 
movies, concerts, canoe trips, 
dramas, comedian perform- 
ances, lectures, and much 
more. 

Students often need to 
relieve the tensions of college 
life and these tyi)es of activi- 
ties and productions provide 
for the perfect opportunity for 



relaxation. Therefore, Center 
Board should be reco^zed as 
one of the most valued organi- 
zations on campus. 

To represent the wide di- 
versity of student interests, 
the Center Board is made up 
of six committees. They are 
Center Arts, popo/concert, 
coffeehouse/lecture, special 
events, recreation, and house 
affairs. 

The people who make up 
those six committees deter- 
mine the quality of the activi- 
ties we see happening at Qar- 
ion. Join them in determining 
the outcomes. The Center 
Board needs students to voice 
their novel ideas and sugges- 
tions. It's fun and worthwhile. 
Just ask the University Center 
Board President, Anna 
Renne. 

For those students wanting 
to be a part of the University 
Center Board, applications 
are available at 108 Riemer 
Center. There is no fee so ap- 
ply soon and get involved with 
the outrageous student ac- 
tivities at Qarion University. 



Mascot is not a chicken 







NOT A CHICKEN — The new mascot was finally revealed at the football 
game on Saturday. Photo by Bruce Cafurello, Staff Photographer 





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OPEN DAILY 10-9; SUN. 12-5 






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THE CLARION CALL, Clarion, PA, Thursday, Sept. 17, 1987—15 



14-THE CLARION CALL, Clarion, PA. Thursday, Sept. 17, 1987 




Seniors 

Mock interviews offered 



by Shelley Deeter 
Features Staff Writer 



PARENTS WEEKEND. . . The campus came alive with the friends and parents of the CUP Students. 

Photo by Bruce Cafurello, Staff Photographer 



The office of Career Place- 
ment Services will conduct 
mock interviews on various 
dates throughout the first se- 
mester. The dates are as fol- 
lows: Sept. 14, 21, and 28; 
Oct. 5, 12, 19, and 26; Nov. 2, 
9, 16, 23, and 30; and Dec. 7. 
All interviews will be con- 
ducted between 1 and 4 p.m. 
on the above dates. 

These interviews will be as 
close to an actual interview 
as possible. Students parti- 
cipating are asked to be pre- 
pared as if going to an actual 
interview. For example: 
dress professionally, bring a 
copy of a resume, and be pre- 
pared to ask the interviewer 
appropriate questions for im- 
mediate employment goals. 



Chandler Menu 

Thursday, Sept. 17 

lunch ; Red Beet Soup, Corn Owwder, Barbecue Rib Sandwich, Chicken Poe Pie w/Biscuit, Cheese 
Curls, Northern Beans. 

DINNER: Red Beet Soup, Com Chowder, Baked Manicotti, Roast Beef, Cream Style Com, Mash- 
ed Potatoes w/Graw. Whole Baby Beets. 

FRIDAY, SEPT. 18 
BREAKFAST: Hard Boiled Eggs, Bacon, Hash Brown Potatoes, Scrambled Eggs, Banana Bread, 
Apple Fritters w/Syrup, Hot Oatmeal. 

LUNCH: Homemade Chicken Rice Soup, Cream of Cauliflower Soup, Grilled Hamburger on Bun, 
Baked Macaroni and Cheddar Cheese, Corn Chips, Macaroni, Spanish Rice. 
DINNER: Homemade Chicken Rice Soup, Cream of Cauliflower Soup, Chicken Nuggets, Pizza 
with Pepperoni, French Fries, Fish Sandwich. 

SATURDAY, SEPT. 19 
BREAKFAST: Fried Eggs, Home Fried Potatoes, Grilled Ham, Streusel Coffee Cake, French 
Toast w/Syrup, Hot Oatmeal. 

Ll'NCH: Cream of Mushroom Soup, Submarine Sandwich, Chile Con Came, Potato Chips, 
Buttered Zucchinni Squash. 

DINNER: Cream of Mushroom Soup, Roast Top Round of Beef, Breaded Chicken Cutlet, Green 
and Yellow Beans, Baked Potato, Buttered Mixed Vegetables. 

SATURD.AY, SEPT. 20 
BRUNCH: Grapefruit Half, Chilled Pineapple Slices, Open Face Reuben Sandwich, Hot Cakes 
with Syrup, Fluffy Scrambled Eggs, Sausage Links, Sliced Bacon, Tater Gems, Hot Oatmeal, 
Banana. 

DINNER: Tomato Soup, Beef Broth, Bar-B-Q Chicken, Swedish Meat Balls, Glazed Apples, Mixed 
Wild and Long Grain Rice, Buttered Carrots. 

MONDAY. SEPT. 21 
BREAKFAST: Chilled Grapefruit Half, Fried Eggs, Sunnyside or Over, English Muffins, Home 
Fried Potatoes, Banana Bread, Stewed Prunes, Blueberry Pancakes with Syrup, Oatmeal. 
LUNCH: Homemade Chicken Gumbo Soup, Cream of Carrot Soup, Hot Dogs on Bun, Cream 
Chipped Beef on Toast, French Fries, White Shoepeg Com. 

DINNER: Homemade Chicken Gumbo Soup. Cream of Carrot Soup, Beef Ravioli, Battered Fried 
Fish, Green Peas in Butter Sauce, Parsley Noodles, Creamed Onions. 

TUESDAY, SEPT. 22 
BREAKFAST: Scrambled Eggs, Bacon, Cream of Wheat. Com Muffin, Hash Brown Potatoes, 
French Toast with Syrup, Sausage Patty, French Crumb Cake 

LUNCH: Cream of Potato Soup. Beef Rice Soup, Hot Turkey Sandwich with gravy. Tuna Salad, 
Shredded Hash Brown Potatoes, Wax Beans with Pimento. 

DINNER : Cream of Potato Soup, Beef Rice Soup, Beef Stroganoff, Roast Pork, Buttered Noodles, 
Cream Style Cora, Italian Mixed Vegetables. 

WEDNESDAY, SEPT. 23 
BREAKFAST: Cantaloupe or Grapefruit Half, Cheese Omelette, Cream of Rice, Home Fried Po- 
tatoes, Caramel Buns, Desert Peaches, Waffles with Topping, Coffee Cake. 
LUNCH: Homemade Vegetable Soup, Cream of Celery Soup, Chees^urger on Bun, Kolbassi 
Cooked in Sauerkraut, Cheese Curls, Sauerkraut. 

DINNER: Homemade Vegetable Soup, Cream of Celery Soup, Lasagna, Fried Shrimp, Mixed 
Vegetables in Butter, Delmonico Potatoes, Green Baby Limas. 



DflNCCR'S STUDIO 

501 MAIN STREET CURION 

ANNOUNCES 
FALL REGISTRATION IN 

^BALLET »^TAP ^JAZZ ^DANCERIZE 
TO ENROLL CALL 226-4132 
CLASSES BEGIN SEPT. 8th 

PROFESSIONAL INSTRUCTION 




1. 
2. 
3. 
4. 
5. 
6. 
7. 
8. 

9. 

10. 



Madonna "Who's That Girl" - Sire 

Los Lobes "La Bamba" ■ Slash/Warner Bros. 

Suzanne Vega "Luka" - A & M 

Richard Marx "Don't Mean Nothing" - Manhattan 

The Whispers "Rock Steady" - Solar 

Debbie Gibson "Only In My Dreams" - Atlantic 

Starship "It's Not Over ('Til It's Over)" - Grunt/RCA 

Huey Lewis And The News "Doingjt All For My Baby" 

Chrysalis 
U2 "I Still Haven't Found What I'm Looking For" - 

Island 
Whitesnake "Here I Go Again" ■ Geffen 






i 








OMA. CKimPTCD 




Clarion Co. National Organization 

For Women 
Sponsors An 8 Week 

WOMEN'S CONSCIOUS- 
NESS RAISING 

(A discussion group to explore different topics' 
Mon., Sept. 28, 7-9 p.m. Room 60 Pierce 

First Week Is Prerequisite to following 7 weeks. 
Attendance will not commit anyone to more meetings. 



The mock interviews will 
be video-taped by a staff 
member ancl will be replayed 
to critique the student s per- 
formance in an interview sit- 
uation. The interviewer will 
then be able to answer 
Questions and discuss the stu- 
dent's strengths and areas 
for improvement in the inter- 
view. 

This program is just an- 
other dimension added to the 
CUP student's job search 
preparation. The purpose of 
these practice sessions is to 
give the graduating student an 
appreciation of what to expect 
in a typical job interview, so 
he/she is prepared for respon- 
sible job seeking. All students 
interested in a mock interview 
should contact the Career 
Placement Services at 814-226- 
2323. 

Rush Starts 

by Drew Fair 

Features Staff Writer 

Rush has once again made 
its appearance on the scene at 
CUP. But what exactly does 
all this mean to the freshmen 
on campus? Are the parties 
geared primarily to the upper- 
classmen or can anyone 
attend? Freshmen after all 
are confused enough merely 
about the building codes on 
their schedules let alone the 
purpose and meaning of rush. 
This, of course, is not the fault 
of any one person, it is just 
another facet of the extreme 
confusion of freshman life. 
This is normal though, for 
when the freshmen of 1987 be- 
come the seniors of 1991 a 
whole new freshman class will 
be entering the obligitory 
state of bewilderment. FYesh- 
men can take comfort in the 
fact that the Greek System 
will be waiting for them when 
they are ready to join the 
ranks of 'upperclassmen.' 

Every week the 'Greek 
News' will appear in the Clar- 
ion Call and will feature up- 
coming events and small 
exerpts concerning the greek 
way of life. The Greek System 
is important to the students at 
CUP, not just the members of 
Greek organizations, but also 
to the entire student body, 

PUZZLE SOLUTION 



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gpomi^s... 




Pirates get hof 
too late 



by David Mahaffey 
Sports Editor 



The Pittsburgh Pirates are one 
of the hottest teams in baseball at 
present and are doing it with good 
pitching and a team with no big 
name stars. 

OK so you say, but the Pirates 
have Barry Bonds, Andy Van 
Slyke and Bobby Bonilla. 

Well, Van Slyke is a good all- 
around ball player and will be a 
key to the future success in Pitts- 
burgh. 

Bonilla has started to come into 
his own since moving to third and 
he too will be a future Pirate star. 

Barry Bonds, is a year or so 
away from being a major star for 
the Pirates. He is emerging slow- 
ly as a power hitter and has al- 
ready shown his defensive skills. 
Remember Eric Davis was slow 
to start. 

Finally, in baseball, my hat is 
off to Sid Thrift. I was one of 
those who called him unfavorable 
adjectives when he traded away 
Tony Pena earlier this year. 

Well, I miss Tony in a Pirate 
uniform, but Van Slyke, Mike 
Dunne and Mike Lavallier make 
him a dimmer memory as the 
wins go on. 

In football: 

*Yes, Penn State was beaten by 
a better team in Alabama, but the 
season is still young, my fellow 
Nittany Lion fans. 

*The Steelers made the big 
plays and the 49ers were flat. 
Pittsburgh will have to get more 
from Mark Malone this week if 
they are to beat Cleveland. 

♦Tampa Bay fans are saying 
Vinny who? The Buccaneer man- 
agement is saying why didn't 
DeBerg play this well before we 
paid out $8 million! 

♦Since most of my thoughts this 
week turned to baseball I thought 
I would indulge in some trivial in- 
formation. 

Of the 714 homeruns hit by 
Babe Ruth in his career 10 were 
inside the park round-trippers. 




SPORTS 



Football 



Eagles lose 14-8 In opener 



by Jerry Joyce, 
Sports Staff Writer 



Qarion University opened 
its 1987 football season at 
home against Fairmont State 
College and fell short in a hard 
fou^t 14-8 loss. 

After electing to receive the 
opening kickoff, Fairmont 
State's opening drive began on 
their own 33-yard line. On the 
first play from scrimmage, 
quarterback Tom Morrone 
fumbled the ball and Ed 
Bryan recovered for a 1-yard 
loss. On second down, Don 
Overton ran a sweep to the 
right side and was quickly met 
by a tenacious Clarion de- 
fense. The play, however, was 
good for oiUy 1 yard. On third 
and long, Morrone threw a 16- 
yard pass to NAIA Ail-Amer- 
ican wide receiver Mike Ros- 
coe. 

Tliree plays later, Fairmont 
State scored on a flea-flicker; 
Morrone handed the ball to 
Overton who threw a 47-yard 
touchdown pass to a wide open 
Roscoe. Collins converted the 
extra-point attempt and Clar- 
ion found itself down 7-0. 

Clarion's opening drive, 
highlighted by a pair of runs 
by fullback Mick Kehoe and 
quarterback Doug Dawson, 
ended abruptly by a strong 
Fairmont State defense and 
the Golden Eagles were forc- 
^ to punt. 

Clarion's defense was solid 
on Fairmont's next possession 
and gave the ball to the of- 
fense at their own 48. 

Dawson was sacked on the 
first play for a 7-yard loss. On 
the following play, Dawson 
completed a 10-yard pass to 
spiit-eiid Mike Brestensky. On 
third down and 7, Dawson 
threw an incomplete pass to 



tight end Jerry Starr and Clar- 
ion was forced to punt. 

Four plays later, Morrone 
handed it off to Kikume, who 
handed it off to Overton, who 
ran virtually untouched 49 
yards for another Fairmont 
touchdown. Collins converted 
the extra-point attempt and 
Fairmont State took a com- 
manding 14-0 lead. 

Clarion was forced to punt 
on the next possession and 
Fairmont once again had the 
ball. On the first play, 
Morrone threw a pass to Ros- 
coe which was good for 7 
yards. Next, Clarion held 
Overton to a 1-yard gain, then 
Bryan ran ahead for 5 yards 
and a first down. Morrone 
threw an incomplete pass and 
Fairmont State was penalized 



5 yards for an ineligible player 
downfield. 

Then Clarion's defense 
came to life. On second and 15, 
Morrone got sacked by tackle 
Mark Kelly for a loss of 7 
yards. On the very next play, 
nose guard Mark Jones 
sacked Morrone for an 8-yard 
loss and Fairmont was forced 
to punt. 

The third quarter was a dog- 
fight. The Clarion defense sti- 
fled two drives by Fairmont 
and the offense twice started 
to piece together a scoring 
drive. 

On the first drive of the 
fourth quarter, tailback Ken 
Dworek went over the top for 
a 1-yard touchdown run. The 
2-point conversion attempt 
failed. 



Fairmont State was forced 
to punt on their next posses- 
sion from their 11-yard line 
and Golden Eagle comerback 
James Rachel tackled punter 
Ken Oravek in the end zone 
for a safety. 

Qarion showed a lot of pro- 
mise in the second half and 
started to show some confi- 
dence early in the fourth quar- 
ter. With a healthy Doug Em- 
minger and more confidence, 
Clarion wiU be more competi- 
tive in its remaining games. 

NOTES: Golden Eagle 
punter Phil Bujakowski was 
back in the lineup for Qarion 
after missing the 1986 season. 
Bujakowski notched a 43.5 
yard average on eight punts 
with the longest traveling 66 
yards. 




ON THE MOVE. . . Clarion tailback Ken Dworek, (#20) makes a move off of the block by Ron Urbansky (#2). 

Photo by Bruce Cafurello, Staff Photographer 



V-ball has success at Navy 



by Susan Kurtz, 
Sports Staff Writer 



The 1987 Clarion Univer- 
sity women's volleyball team 
proved successful at the 
Navy Tournament at Annap- 
olis, MD this past weekend. 
The lady spikers finished in 
third place out of 12 teams. 

Coach Opalski feels this 
was a very competitive tour- 
nament. All of the teams that 
were there were nationally 
ranked teams, ahead of Clar- 
ion. 

Tlie first match was against 
Coppin University with a 15-0, 



15-0, 15-0, shut-out win for 
Qarion. 

Barb Buck and Carrie Haw- 
ley led the Eagles with six 
kills each. Sue Holcombe led 
in serves with six service 
aces. 

Missy O'Rourke set through- 
out this match with a 95% pro- 
ficiency rate. This means that 
for all the attempts O'Rourke 
had, 95% were effective to set 
up attacks. 

Opalski was pleased with 
the girls in this match. "When 
you meet a team you are able 
to score against quickly your 



players may become lax. The 
girls kept their skill level at 
one consistency throughout 
the entire match," Opalski 
said. 

The second match was 
against Shippensburg Univer- 
sity. Qarion won the match in 
four games, 15-9, 15-13, 9-15, 
15-8. Buck again led with six 
kills followed by Holcombe 
and Jodi Pezek. 

The Golden Eagle coach 
was also pleased with this vic- 
tory, as she said Shippensburg 
is one of the strongest teams 
in the Eastern division. 



"Our one problem through- 
out this match was that we 
had 13 service errors. If we 
would have minimized the er- 
rors we wouldn't have gone 
four games," said Opalski. 

Diane Guenther played an 
excellent defensive game 
against Shippensburg accord- 
ing to Opalski who was very 
pleased with Guenther's con- 
sistency. "Every ball Diane 
passed from the back row, 
was able to be converted into 
an offensive attack," Opalski 
said. 

(SeeV-ball...Page18) 



16-THE CLARION CALL, Clarion, PA, Thursday, Sept. 17, 1987 



The Pre-eminent One 



From th e Che ap Seats 



by Robert DiDomenico 

Sports Staff Writer 

It is said that love is better the 
second time around. 

Love is one of the few areas 
where the Pre-eminent one is no 
expert, but it's no secret that the 
droves of my adoring fans are 
geared up for a torrid affair de 
coeur avec moi in the new NFL 
year. 

That's right, not even gradua- 
tion could keep His Pre-eminence 
from the thrill of the Prognosti- 
cating Arts. I sincerely thank 
The Call Sports Editor Tank Ma- 
haffey for granting me the oppor- 
tunity to do as only I can. Yes, I 
did bid farewell in the last issue 
of last semester (and added some 
useless wasted sentiment) but 
lucky for you, I'm back. 

The NFL's first week is always 
difficult to predict so I decided 
not to. The surprises were in 
abundance: the Steelers' spank- 
ing of the 49ers; Steve DeBerg's 
going off in Tampa Bay ; the Oil- 
ers' upset of the Rams just to 
mention a few. 

The second week is no prognos- 
ticator's picnic either. The trends 
have yet to be separated from the 
flukes. If anyone's up to the task, 
however, it is I. Here are some 
added thoughs: 

-If there is any player strike it 
will be a short one. The players 



will learn from the big loss they 
took in the strike of '82 and Gene 
Upshaw doesn't have a unified 
union anyway. 

-The Steelers won't win many 
more games with Mark Malone 
going 9 for 35, will they? 

-Tank's absurd assertion that 
Penn State will contend to defend 
its fluke National Championship 
was etched in stone Saturday 
night against Alabama. 

-The last statement may have 
been gibberish but I am very, 
very cool! 

-The owners should definitely 
grant the players demand for nat- 
ural grass on all fields. There's 
just too many injuries on the car- 
pet. 

Here are the predictions : 

BROWNS over STEELERS: I 
don't think the Steelers can run 
on the Browns the way they did 
against the 49ers. Mark Malone 
can't continue his satanic perfor- 
mance and the Steelers' record 
on grass is poor. 

GIANTS over COWBOYS: The 
Cowboys lost to the Cardinals last 
week. Nuffsaid. 

DENVER over GREEN BAY: 
Forrest Gregg could be doing a 
lot of apologizing after this one. 

RAIDERS over LIONS: This, 
despite the fact that the Raider 
QB situation isn't getting any 
better. There aren't as many 
people calling Al Davis a genius 
these days. 



BILLS over OILERS: I think 
the Bills will cause some prob- 
lems now that Jim Kelly has a 
full training camp under his belt. 

SEATTLE over KANSAS CITY: 
The Seahawks are a better team 
than they showed last week in 
Denver. 

DOLPHINS over COLTS: Now 
that his finger injury has healed, 
Dan Marino will be riddling NFL 
secondaries as usual. 

VIKINGS over RAMS: This 
pick may defy all logic, but I can 
do that. 

SAINTS over EAGLES: I'm 
not sure if the Saints are for real, 
but the Eagles aren't fooling any- 
body. 

SAN DIEGO over ST. LOUIS: 
This even though Dan Fouts and 
the Chargers were out of sync 
last week. 

CINCINNATI ovei SAN FRAN- 
CISCO: If the Chargers were out 
of sync, then the 49ers were out to 
lunch last week against the Steel- 
ers. 

BEARS over BUCCANEERS: 
No Steve DeBerg Superman imi- 
tations this week. 

REDSKINS over FALCONS: 
The Falcons fired Marion Camp- 
bell and then hired him back. 
Who's responsible for that? 

PATRIOTS over JETS: If the 
Pats can forget last year and re- 
gain their rushing attack of '85, 
they are one of the AFC's con- 
tenders. 



Eagle Outlook 



Grubb - Hershman 



THE CLARION CALL, Clarion, PA, Thursday, Sept. 17, 1987—17 



After an opening 14-8 loss 
against Fairmont State 
College last Saturday, the 
Golden Eagles will be looking 
for their first win of the 1987 
football season this Saturday, 
as Qarion travels to Ferris 
State College (Michigan). 
Played at FSC's Top Taggart 
Stadium, kickoff is slated for 
1:30 p.m. 

While Clarion enters the 
contest with an 0-1 record, 
Ferris State, coached by Keith 
Otterbein, enters the game 
with an 0-2 mark. The 
Bulldogs lost their season 
opener at Wisconsin-White- 
water 33-26, then last Saturday 
dropped their home opener 
against a rugged Indianapolis 
squad 35-19. 

"Offensively they have an 
awful lot of weapons," noted 
Clarion head coach Gene 
Sobolewski. "They are a big 
play team and have the poten- 
tial to put points on the Doard 
in a hurry. I think we have to 
keep those big plays in check 
in order to win this game. Fer- 
ris is a solid team, much bet- 
ter than their current 0-2 rec- 
ord may indicate and we need 
to be mentally prepared to 
play 60 minutes this Satur- 
day." 

The Clarion University of- 
fense sputtered last Saturday 



against Fairmont State, 
producing 79 yards on the 
ground and 60 yards passing. 
Senior quarterback Doug 
Emminger, who sat out Qar- 
ion's opener with a knee in- 
jury, remains questionable for 
this Saturday's encounter 
against the Bulldogs. 

Entering the season, Em- 
minger's career stats show 
220 completions in 409 at- 
tempts, good for 2,684 yards 
and 14 td's. If Emminger is 
unable to play, either sopho- 
more Doug Dawson or fresh- 
man Mike Carter will get the 
call. Dawson, who directed 
the Eagles for more than 
three quarters last Saturday, 
completed 6 of 18 aerials for 43 
yar(B. Carter, who played in 
two series in the fourth quar- 
ter, was 1 for 8 passing for 17 
yards. 

The Ferris State defense 
has had some difficulty in the 
first two games stopping their 
opponents. In FSC's opening 
loss to Wisconsin-Whitewater 
(33-26) , the defense yielded 440 
yards of total offense (135 
rushing, 305 passing). In 
Saturday's loss to Indianapo- 
lis (35-19) , the "D" gave up 398 
yards (58 rushing, 340 pass- 
ing) of total offense. Up front, 
1986 AP HM All-America 



(See Outlook. ..Page 20) 



Sports Spoil igh t ..on sue pntz 



by Michael A. Sexauer, 
Assistant Sports Editor 



To say that Lady Eagles 
Tennis Captain Sue Fritz is 
good at what she does is an 
understatement. 

Sue Fritz is, and has been 
good at playing tennis. Sue's 
father started her swinging at 
tennis balls at the young age 
of five. During her junior year 
at Elk County Christian High 
School in St. Marys, Sue and 
older brother Steve captured 
the No. 1 Mixed Doubles Div. 9 
championships. 

Tlirough her four years of 
high school tennis playing No. 
1 singles, mixed doubles, and 
doubles. Sue compiled an out- 



standing 45-4 record; four 
years straight as MVP and 
letter winner. 

Also while at Elk County 
Christian, Sue started two 
years with J.V. Basketball 
and two years with Varsity 
Basketball. 

If Sue Fritz came to Clarion 
afraid of being lost in the 
crowd of the university and 
older players, her fears must 
have disappeared after re- 
ceiving the "Golden Eaglette" 
award for spirit along with 
doubles partner Lynne Fye. 
She played excellently at No. 1 
singles and No. 1 doubles dur- 
ing her first two years. The 
Lady Eagles elected Sue as 



their captain her sophomore 
year. 

The 1986-87 season began as 
Fritz's most promising. She 
finished the regular season as 
No. 2 singles PSAC champ 
with a 19^ sweep. With dou- 
bles partner. No. 4 Singles 
PSAC champ Lynne Fye, she 
shared the title of No. 2 Dou- 
bles in the PSAC. 

An 18-0 record last year 
earned the duo an invitation to 
Nationals the following May. 
Sue and Lynne never made 
the trip to North Ridge, CA. 

On St. Patrick's Day, while 
practicing with the CUP 
women's softball team, Sue 
tore 50% of her ligaments in 



her right knee. Not only was 
the trip cancelled, but Sue's 
career as a tennis player was 
in serious jeopardy. 

She looks back now and re- 
members missing Nationals 
as the biggest disappointment 
in her career as a tennis play- 



er. However, the knee injury 
that caused her to miss Na- 
tionals gave new meaning to 
the philosophy Sue uses to de- 
scribe training for any sport; 
**. . .dedication, determina- 
tion, hard work, and love for 

(See Fritz. ..Page 20) 




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Photo by Mike Bordo, Photography Editor 






I 



Major League dream in future 



by Eric Richey, 
Sports Staff Writer 



A chance to play profession- 
al baseball is something that 
has probably crossed the mind 
of every kid in America at one 
time or another. The fame 
that comes with playing Ma- 
jor League Baseball is unique 
in this country and is not 
reached in any other profes- 
sion. 

Along with playing the 
game itself, comes the fans, 
ttie baseball cards, and the big 
money. Although in a much 
less glamorous setting, two 
former Golden Eagles have 
taken huge steps at reaching 
that elusive plateau. 



In the first week of June, 
Gary Grubb became the se- 
cond Golden Eagle in as many 
years to be selected in the 
Major League Draft. Picked 
in the 19th round by the Cali- 
fornia Angels, the 1986 PSAC- 
West "Player of the Year" 
was assigned to the Salem An- 
gels, a Class A affiliate in the 
Northwest League. 

As with many college play- 
ers, the switch to Minor 
League Baseball for Grubb 
was a difficult one at first. 
"The biggest change for me 
was going from the aluminum 
to the wooden bats," said 
Grubb. As for the grueling 78- 
game schedule in a 77-day 
period and the day-to-day tra- 



vel, Grubb added, "It's not 
any of the glamour you get in 
the Major League. It's tough 
m«itally and financially. " 

Grubb had to work his way 
into the lineup, but still was 
platooned for much of the sea- 
son. He split his playing time 
between third and first base, 
but for Grubb, who was a first 
team all PSAC-West selection 
in each of his last three sea- 
sons at Qarion, sitting on the 
bench was a new experience. 
"It's tough to get a rhythm 
going when you're not playing 
everyday. You have to keep 
yourself prepared both physi- 
cally and mentally to play at 
any time," said Grubb. 

He went on to finish the sea- 



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son with a very respectable 
.252 average, with three home 
runs (including one on his first 
at bat as a pro), and 16 RBI's. 
His performance both on and 
off the field impressed Salem 
manager Chris Smith. "Gary 
made great strides and im- 
proved as much as anybody 
on the team. He's a great kid 
with a super attitude, and 
that's an important attribute 
in the Minor Leagues," said 
Smith. 

While Grubb was breaking 
into pro ball, hard throwing 
Bill Hershman was busy es- 
tablishing himself in the St. 
Louis Cardinals' organization. 

Selected in the 15th round of 
the 1986 June draft. Hershman 
spent that season as a relief 
pitcher for the Erie Cardinals. 
"That was probably the most 
difficult adjustment for me," 
said Hershman, who was used 
exclusively as a starter in his 
four years at Clarion. Once he 
learned what his role for Erie 
would be, he became more 
comfortable with it, and 
pitched effectively, ending the 
season at 3-2, with one save, 
and a 3.17 ERA. 

A fine season at Erie, and a 
good spring training earlier 
this year led to a spot on the 
St. Petersburg roster. Al- 
though still in Qass A, it was 
still a step up for Hershman. 

After beginning the '87 sea- 
son as a reliever, he was plac- 
ed into the starting rotation 
when manager Dave Bialias' 
staff began to struggle. 

Hershman took advantage 
of the opportunity to return to 
his more familiar role, and 
pitched well in 15 starts, 
including a near no-hitter, 7% 
innings against the Clearwa- 
ter Phillies. 

But that's when an over 
abundance of pitchers who 
needed work were placed into 
Bialas' starting rotation and 
for Hershman, that meant 
back to the bullpen. "That's 
when things really started to 
fall apart," said Hershman. A 
nagging pain in his pitching 
shoulder led to a bout with ten- 
donitis, which made it very 



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difficult to warm up. "Some of 
the times that I would go out 
there my arm just wouldn't be 
loose and the bottom line was 
that I just didn't pitch well 
from the bullpen," said Hersh- 
man. 

Feeling like he must be on a 
George Steinbrenner shuttle 
bus to Colombus, Hershman's 
yo-yo experience from starter 
to reliever continued up to the 
final regular season game 
when he took to the mound as 
a £''«i;er for the 16th and final 
time. The result was a positive 
one; a seven-inning perform- 
ance, which earned him his 
fourth win of the year. 

The Cardinals' organization 
seems hi^ on the future of the 
fireballing righthander. 
"Bill's one of the harder 
throwers in the league (Flor- 
ida State). He has a good, 
lively young arm and those 
are just hard to come by," 
said St. Petersburg Vice Pres- 
ident and General Manager 
GaryRigley. 

Both Grubb and Hershman 
plan to use the winter for stay- 
ing in shape and building up 
for next spring. Grubb also 
plans to get a job before head- 
ing back to spring training 
where Salem manager CJiris 
Smith feels "could very well 
make a spot on the Quad Ci- 
ties roster," which would be a 
step up for Grubb. 

Hershman meanwhile, was 
one of four members of his 
team to receive an invitation 
to play in the Florida Instruc- 
tional League which begins 
this week and runs through 
November. The two main 
areas of his game that Hersh- 
man feels he needs to work on 
will be regaining control of his 
breaking ball which he lost 
near the end of this season, 
and staying in front in the 
count to hitters who Hersh- 
man says, "can really bum 
you in this League when they 
get ahead in the count. " 

Although both grubb and 
Hershman are still a long way 
off from the autograph group- 
ies, the Topps baseball cartte, 
and the six-digit pay checks, 
thev have giant bounds in 
making what is only a fantasy 
for many of us, a reality for 
them. 



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18-THE CLARION CALL, Clarion, PA, Thursday, Sept. 17, 1987 




1987 VOLLEYBALL TEAM. . . Bottom Row, (L-R), Carolyn Howley, Barb Buck, 
Tammy Wolfe, Melissa O'Rourke; Middle Row, Keli Blosei, Denise Layton, 
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Sharon Miller, Sue Holcombe. 




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Tennis team still winning 



THE CLARION CALL, Clarion, PA, Thursday, Sept. 17, 1987-U 



by David Mahaffey 
Sports Editor 



The Lady Golden Eagle ten- 
nis team opened up the 1987 
season with a 9-0 triumph over 
Penn State-Behrend. 

"We played well consider- 
ing there were four days of 
rain before the match and we 
had limited practice time," 
said Tennis Coach Norbert 
Baschnagel. 

Coach Baschnagel said he 
was pleased with his team's 
performance, but added there 
is still some work to do. "We 
still have to sharpen up the 
fundamentals," said Basch- 
nagel. 



Winning for the Golden Ea- 
gles against Penn State-Beh- 
rend were: 

SINGLES 

No. 1 Sue Fritz 6-1,6-1 

No. 2 Amanda Bell 6-1,6-0 

No. 3 LoraKohn 6-1,6-3 

No. 4 Tammy Myers 6-3, 6-0 

No. 5 C.Vallecorsa 6-0,6-0 

No. 6 Jane Bender 6-0,6-0 

DOUBLES 

No. 1 L. Warren, Fritz 6-1,6-1 

No. 2 Kohn, Myers 6-2,6-1 

No. 3 Bell, McAdams 6-1,6-1 

TTie Lady Eagles earned 
their second win of the season 
with a 9^ victory over Divi- 
sion I St. Bonaventure. 

Winning for the Golden Ea- 
gles were: 

SINGLES 

No. 1 Warren 6-2,6-2 



No. 2 Fritz 6-0,6-3 

No. 3 Bell 6-0,6-0 

No.4 Kohn 6-4,6-3 

No. 5 Myers 6-3,6-2 

No. 6 Vallecorsa 6-1,6-3 

DOUBLES 

No. 1 Warren, Fritz 6-0,6-4 

No. 2 Myers, Kohn 6-3,6-0 

No. 3 McAdams, Bell 6-1,6-2 

The Official Roster of the 
1967 tenms team is: 

Amanda Bell, Jane Bend- 
er, Sue Fritz, Lora Kohn, Ro- 
sie Kramarski, Diana Lee, 
Debbie McAdams, Tammy 
Myers, Rachel Prokopchan, 
Renee Tarr, Carolyn Valle- 
corsa and Lisa Warren. 

The tennis team will get a 
tough test this weekend at In- 
diana as they defend their 
1986 title. 



Coach Miller 

Assumes dual role 



by Michael A. Sexauer, 
Assistant Sports Editor 



Ttus fall's swimming season 
at Clarion University begins 
with a title change and a per- 
sonnel change. 

Coach Bill Miller, originally 
the men's swimming coach, 

Vbaii 

(Continued from Page 15) 

Clarion found themselves 
across the net from Navy in 
the next match. The Lady Ea- 
gles lost in three games 9-15, 
11-15, 13-15. Holcombe led this 
game with nine kills followed 
by Buck with eight kills. 
Guenther was able to get four 
service aces past the Navy 
team. 

"The Navy team is a very 
strong and also tall team. We 
had 15 service errors in this 
match. Once you go over 10 er- 
rors it is very hard to win 
games," said Opalski. 

The Lady netters made it 
into the semi-finals and chal- 
lenged Navy once again. Qar- 
ion lost 8-15, 6-15, 7-15. Opalski 
said, "We had a better serving 
and receiving game this time. 
Navy has a quick attack and 
we were unable to stop their 
hits. Our blocking was not as 
weU as it should have been." 

This week is proving to be 
busy for the team. On Tues- 
day, they are matched against 
All(^eny and Slippery Rock 
at Alleghany. 

Friday will be the start of 
the annual Clarion Classic 
Volleyball Tournament. 
Teams from division I, II, III, 
will be in this tournament. 

The teams include Mercy- 
hurst College, Robert Morris 
College, and St. Francis Col- 
lege. 

Opalski feels that if the girls 
play to their potential they will 
do well. She said, "If we play 
with intensity and consistency 
we will have a good chance of 
winning this tournament. " 



now holds the title of Head 
Coach of both, the men's and 
women's teams. 

Former women's coach 
Becky Leas announced her re- 
tirement last spring for health 
reasons and also to pursue her 
PhD. Rather than hire an 
outsider to take her place, the 
Athletic Department kept it 
"in the family" by appointing 
Miller as mentor of both 
teams. 

Assisting Coach Miller in his 
dual role this year is Slippery 
Rock alunmus Corrin Convis. 

Coach Convis brings with 
her to CUP a B.S. and Masters 
degree in Health/Physical 
Education. 

As an undergraduate stu- 
dent at Slippery Rock, Convis 
achieved a record impressive 
enough to make her me most 



successful swimmer in the 
history of that university. Cor- 
rin Convis' experience as a 
swimming coach began at 
Slippery Rock as an assistant 
wlme studying for her Mas- 
ter's Degree. 

In the past, when the men's 
and women's practices were 
held separately in the after- 
noon, they were run by the in- 
dividual coaches. Morning 
practices found the teams 
training together and the 
coaches alternating. Miller 
sees the addition of an assist- 
ant a plus because both teams 
have now "gained a coach" at 
every practice instead of the 
sii^e coach running practice 
as in past years. 

The teams are in pre-season 
practice now. Their season be- 
gins in late October. 




NEW COACH. . 

coaching staff. 



, Joe Johnson is the newest mennber of the Clarion Footbali 
Photo by Chuck Uzza, Staff Photographer 







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20-THE CLARION CALL, Clarion, PA, i nursoay, sept.u,iw/ 



Outlook.... 



(Continued from Page 1G) 



noseguard Dan Krupp sat out 
the Indianapolis game with a 
fractured foot and is question- 
able for Clarion. The top tack- 
les appear in the middle with 
linebackers Jeff Robeson (19 
stops) and Nick Coleman (22 
tackles). The secondary has 
Tony Smith and Randy Jones 
with an interception each. 

Although the Ferris State 
defense has had two tough 
weeks, the offense continues 



to play well behind all-every- 
thing quarterback Dave 
DenBraber. DenBraber, who 
rattled the Clarion defense 
last year completing 17 of 20 
passes for 352 yards and 4 td's. 
In his first two games of 1987 
DenBraber has connected on 
36 of 71 aerials for 489 yards 
and 3 td's. 

DenBraber's favorite tar- 
get, speedster Cedric Gordon, 
is also once again having a 




fine season. Gordon has latch- 
ed onto 12 passes for 220 yards 
and 2 td's thus far. Against 
Clarion last year, Gordon 
hauled in 10 passes for 264 
yards and 3 td's. 

The Ferris running game is 
very solid, behind Tony 
Misko, LaDon Free and Brady 
Schaeffer. Misko is the 
leading ground gainer, getting 
159 yards and 1 td on 39 at- 
tempts. Free meanwhile has 
netted 84 yards and 2 td's on 23 
carries, while Schaeffer has 
posted 20 carries for 110 yards. 

Overall, Ferris State's of- 
fense is averaging 22.5 points 
per game, as well as 413 yards 
of total offense per contest. 
Broken down, the Bulldogs 
appear more balanced with 
244.5 passing and 168.5 on the 



ground. 

Clarion's defense will un- 
doubtedly get a strong overall 
test in Big Rapids, Michigan 
this week. Up front, the 
Qarion **D" may continue to 
be without the services of 1986 
AP 3rd team All-American 
Lou Weiers. If that is the case, 
Qarion will use Mark Jones 
(10 tackles, 1 sack) and Jim 
Keller (5 stops) at noseguard, 
along with Mark Kelly (5 hits, 
1 sack), Jeff Clutter (1 tackle) 
and Tim Shook (7 jolts) at 
tackle. 

The defensive end posts con- 
tinue to be anchored by vet- 
erans Bob Vemick and Tom 
Anderson. Both Vemick and 
Anderson have 5 tackles each 
after one game. 

In Clarion's defensive se- 



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condary, John Besic (12 stops, 
1 broken-up pass) and either 
Steve Frank (4 hits) or James 
Rachel (6 tackles) will play at 
the comers, with John Peter- 
man (8 jolts) and Bob Kelly 
(10 tackles, 1 broken-up pass) 
at the safeties. 

CLARION NOTES: Ferris 
defeated Clarion last year 38-28 in 
the first-ever meeting between the 
two schools. . .The Golden Eagles 
will open PSAC-Westem Division 
play next Saturday, when the Golden 
Eagles travel to California (Sept. 
26th). . .Game time at Cal's Adam- 
son Stadium is set for 1:30 p.m. . . 
Clarion's next home game will be on 
October 3 against Slippery Rock. . . 
That game against the Rockets will 
also serve as Clarion's Homecom- 
ing Game. . .Kickoff for homecom- 
ing will be at 2 p.m. 

(Story courtesy of the Sports In- 
formation Director's office, CUP). 

Fritz.... 

(Continued from Page 16) 

your sport." 

Determination and hard 
work became her style of liv- 
ing through hours of painful 
therapy and rehabilitation this 
summer. 

It did pay off, and now the 
Lady Eagles have their cap- 
tain back this fall defending 
her title as No. 2 singles 
champ and No. 1 doubles with 
new partner Lisa Warren. 

Fritz says she owes much of 
her success to her family for 
ttieir continuous love and sup- 
port, and to Assistant Trainer 
Tanunie Dreese for her help 
this summer. 

Fritz plans to graduate in 
December of '88 with a degree 
in Finance. After graduation 
she wants to pursue a career 
in Real Estate and keep up 
with tennis as either a player 
or coach. 

As a member of the Invest- 
mait Qub, numerous intra- 
mural teams, and an avid cy- 
clist, Fritz stays busy. 

As captain of the tennis 
team, she reminds the Lady 
Eagles of a saying that she 
shared with former teammate 
Lynne Fye before her grad- 
uation in May; 

"It's not the size of the dog 
in the fight that matters - it's 
the size of the fight in the 
dog." 



Middle States 



CUP commended for periodic report 



by Liz Koones, 
News Editor 



The Middle States Associa- 
tion of Colleges and Schools 
(MSA) has reaffirmed Qarion 
University's accreditation. 
The reaffirmation came in 
June after the Commission on 
Higher Education accepted 



the Periodic Review Report 
submitted by the university. 

In a letter to President 
Bond, the MSA complimented 
Qarion Unversity on its prep- 
aration of **a serious and 
thoughtful Periodic Review 
Report evidencing wide and 
broad institutional partici- 
pation and utilizing an already 



functioning planning pro- cess. They also commended 
cess." "It clearly says to us the university's progress in li- 

that we are doing a good job, ' ' 

said Dr. Robert Eddington, 
Provost and Academic Vice 
President. "This means that 
we are a strong institution." 

The letter went on to 
commend the university for 
developing its planning pro- 



fit clearly says to us 
that we are doing a 
good job/' 

—Dr. Robert 
Eddington 



brary usage, faculty research, 
academic support services 
and enrollment. 

The five-year Periodic Re- 
view Report is one part of a re- 
accreditation review that 
every college and university 
must participate in every 10 
years. The five-year review is 

(See states. . Page 4) 





« 



Americans speal( out 



Ctaxion Hlnii/miUi^ of y^£nni,ylvan 



Thursday, Sept. 24, 1S«7 ^^^ 

CAUJ 



Many agree college costs too much 



by Deborah M. Schofield, 

Editor in Chief 

In the recent debate over 



college costs, the majority of 
Americans agree with U.S. 
Education Secretary WiUiam 




RAINY DAYS AND MONDAYS. .. .and Tuesdays, and Wednesdays, and 
Thursdays. . .seem to have become quite customary at Clarion this fall. 

Photo by David Schorr, Staff Photographer 



Bennett that colleges cost 
much more than the value of 
the education they deliver. 

According to a Media Gen- 
eral Poll released in August, 
60 percent thought private col- 
leges cost too much, and 51 
percent said public college tui- 
tion was too high. 

The College Board esti- 
mated in August that students 
will spend an average of $4,104 
for public higher education 
during the 1987-88 school year. 

This is the seventh straight 
year in which colleges have 
raised tuition in faster than 
the inflation rate. The overall 
tuition situation prompted 
Bennett to renew his attack on 
campus administrators. 

But according to a Chroni- 
cle of Higher Education sur- 
vey, most Americans worried 
about rocketing education 
costs think higher education is 
more expensive than it actual- 
ly is, or have no idea of its 
cost. 

Those who responded to the 
survey estimated public 4- 
year institution costs to be 
$9,120. The College Board re- 
ported public tuition of a resi- 
dent student to be an averaged 
$5,789. 

According to Kenneth Gru- 
gle, CUP Financial Aid Direc- 
tor, "State owned university 
tuition is a very fair price to 
pay. . .it's the best value for 
your dollar." 

CUP in-state tuition for the 
1987-88 academic year totals 
$1,830. By adding room, 
board, and miscellaneous 
fees, the actual cost of attend- 
ing CUP is $4,148. The actual 
cost is then inflated by the uni- 
versity to include extra expen- 



ses, books and supplies, trans- 
portation, and personal ex- 
penses, resulting in a total 
budget figure of $5,425. (An in- 
flated total budget figure also 
results in increased financial 
aid for the student.) 

In all, students, parents, 
state legislatures, and the fed- 
eral government will spend 
$124 million on higher edu- 
cation this year, Bennett 
figured in his annual back-to- 
school report on August 26. 
"The American people have 
made a tremendous financial 
committment to education," 
Bennett said. "It's time we 
started getting a much better 
return in that investment." 

The accusation angers edu- 
cators who say they must 
raise tuition to help compen- 
sate for cuts in the money they 
get from state and the federal 
governments. Additional 
money from the tuition raises 
go to pay for long delayed 
building maintenance and to 
raise faculty salaries which 



have been almost stagnent 
since 1972. 

"In some cases, universities 
have knowingly increased 
their tuition because of finan- 
cial aid increases in the 70's," 
said Grugle. But he does not 
believe this was the case at 
CUP. 

An independent study 
released by Research Asso- 
ciates of Washington noted 
that public campuses have 
kept their own education costs 
to increases of just four per- 
cent. 

Grugle sympathises with 
CUP students. "I would like to 
see tuition stay stable." 

Although tuition costs seem 
overwhelming, CUP is hitting 
record highs in financial aid 
awards this year. Pell and 
PHEAA grants, loans, and 
scholarship awards at CUP 
total nearly $11 million. That 
total will soon exceed $12 mil- 
lion, said Grugle, the highest 
financial aid award total in 
CUP'S history. 



Spring Break shortened 



by Lisa Hampe, 
News Staff Writer 



A few changes have been 
made in the Academic Calen- 
dar this year. The most signi- 
ficant change being in the 
spring break schedule. 

Last year spring break con- 
sisted of nine days in March 
and five days in April for Eas- 
ter, lliis year, spring break 
consists of 11 days in March 
and two days in April for 
E^ter. 

Another change made was 



the shortening of the 
Christmas break. Last year it 
was approximately five weeks 
long; this year it is approxi- 
mately four weeks. 

Each school is required to 
have 75 days of school per 
semester including finals 
week. All changes in the Aca- 
demic Calendar are made 
through the President's office. 
The President approves the 
changes and forwards the new 
calendar to Faculty Senate for 
final approval. 



Finaneiai Aid 

tagged with conditions 

News — Page 5 



Coiiago and fUx liave 
somathing in common 

Features — Page U 



WMlciy 
Crossword Puzzia 

Features — Page 17 



UMiySpiicarswin 
CiaHon Classic 

Sports — Page 19 



20— THE CLARION CALL, Clarion, HA, inursaay, Sept. ^/, wtot 



Outlook.... 



(Continued from Page 16) 



noseguard Dan Krupp sat out 
the Indianapolis game with a 
fractured foot and is question- 
able for Clarion. The top tack- 
les appear in the middle with 
linebackers Jeff Robeson (19 
stops) and Nick Coleman (22 
tackles). ITie secondary has 
Tony Smith and Randy Jones 
with an interception each. 

Although the Ferris State 
defense has had two tough 
weeks, the offense continues 



to play well behind all-every- 
thing quarterback Dave 
DenBraber. DenBraber, who 
rattled the Clarion defense 
last year completing 17 of 20 
passes for 352 yards and 4 td's. 
In his first two games of 1987 
DenBraber has connected on 
36 of 71 aerials for 489 yards 
and 3 td's. 

DenBraber's favorite tar- 
get, speedster Cedric Gordon, 
is also once again having a 






fine season. Gordon has latch- 
ed onto 12 passes for 220 yards 
and 2 td's thus far. Against 
Clarion last year, Gordon 
hauled in 10 passes for 264 
yards and 3 td's. 

The Ferris running game is 
very solid, behind Tony 
Misko, LaDon Pree and Brady 
Schaeffer. Misko is the 
leading ground gainer, getting 
159 yards and 1 td on 39 at- 
tempts. Pree meanwhile has 
netted 84 yards and 2 td's on 23 
carries, while Schaeffer has 
posted 20 carries for 110 yards. 

Overall, Ferris State's of- 
fense is averaging 22.5 points 
per game, as well as 413 yards 
of total offense per contest. 
Broken down, the Bulldogs 
appear more balanced with 
244.5 passing and 168.5 on the 



ground. 

Clarion's defense will un- 
doubtedly get a strong overall 
test in Big Rapids, Michigan 
this week. Up front, the 
Clarion "D" may continue to 
be without the services of 1986 
AP 3rd team All-American 
Lou Weiers. If that is the case. 
Clarion will use Mark Jones 
(10 tackles, 1 sack) and Jim 
Keller (5 stops) at noseguard, 
along with Mark Kelly (5 hits, 
1 sack), Jeff Clutter (1 tackle) 
and Tim Shook (7 jolts) at 
tackle. 

The defensive end posts con- 
tinue to be anchored by vet- 
erans Bob Vemick and Tom 
Anderson. Both Vemick and 
Anderson have 5 tackles each 
after one game. 

In Clarion's defensive se- 



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condary, John Besic (12 stops, 
I broken-up pass) and either 
Steve Frank (4 hits) or James 
Rachel (6 tackles) will play at 
the comers, with John Peter- 
man (8 jolts) and Bob Kelly 
(10 tackles, 1 broken-up pass) 
at the safeties. 

CLARION NOTES: Ferris 
defeated Clarion last year 38-28 in 
the first-ever meeting between the 
two schools. . The Golden Eagles 
will open PSAC-Western Division 
play next Saturday, when the Golden 
Eagles travel to California (Sept. 
26th). . .Game time at Cal's Adam- 
son Stadium is set for 1:30 p.m. . . 
Clarion's next home game will be on 
October 3 against Slippery Rock. . . 
That game against the Rockets will 
also serve as Clarion's Homecom- 
ing Game. . .Kickoff for homecom- 
ing will be at 2 p.m. 

(Story courtesy of the Sports In- 
formation Director's office, CUP). 

Fritz,-.. 

(Continued from Page 16) 

your sport." 

Determination and hard 
work became her style of liv- 
ing through hours of painful 
therapy and rehabilitation this 
summer. 

It did pay off, and now the 
Lady Eagles have their cap- 
tain back this fall defending 
her title as No. 2 singles 
champ and No. 1 doubles with 
new partner Lisa Warren. 

Fritz says she owes much of 
her success to her family for 
their continuous love and sup- 
port, and to Assistant Trainer 
Tammie Dreese for her help 
this summer. 

Fritz plans to graduate in 
December of '88 with a degree 
in Finance. After graduation 
she wants to pursue a career 
in Real Estate and keep up 
with tennis as either a player 
or coach. 

As a member of the Invest- 
ment Qub, numerous intra- 
mural teams, and an avid cy- 
clist, Fritz stays busy. 

As captain of the tennis 
team, she reminds the Lady 
Eagles of a saying that she 
shared with former teammate 
Lynne Fye before her grad- 
uation in May; 

"It's not the size of the dog 
in the fight that matters - it's 
the size of the fight in the 
dog." 



SPORTS 
TIP 




CALL 
2380 



Middle States 

CUP commended for periodic report 



by Liz Koones, 
News Editor 



The Middle States Associa- 
tion of Colleges and Schools 
(MSA) has reaffirmed Clarion 
University's accreditation. 
The reaffirmation came in 
June after the Commission on 
Higher Education accepted 



the Periodic Review Report 
submitted by the university. 

In a letter to President 
Bond, the MSA complimented 
Clarion Unversity on its prep- 
aration of ''a serious and 
thoughtful Periodic Review 
Report evidencing wide and 
broad institutional partici- 
pation and utilizing an already 



functioning planning pro- cess. They also commended 
cess." "It clearly says to us the university's progress in li- 
that we are doing a good job," 



said Dr. Robert Eddington, 
Provost and Academic Vice 
President. "This means that 
we are a strong institution." 

The letter went on to 
commend the university for 
developing its planning pro- 



'^It clearly says to us 
that we are doing a 
good job. " 

—Dr. Robert 
Eddington 



brary usage, faculty research, 
academic support services 
and enrollment. 

The five-year Periodic Re- 
view Report is one part of a re- 
accreditation review that 
every college and university 
must participate in every 10 
years. The five-year review is 

(See states Page 4) 



I 




LARION « 



Americans speak out 



CtaiLon ^niuExiiiij of ipEnni-yLuania 



V 

Thursday, Sept. 24, 1987 ^^^ 



Many agree college costs too much 



by Deborah M. Schofield, 
Editor in Chief 



In the recent debate over 



college costs, the majority of 
Americans agree with U.S. 
Education Secretary William 




RAINY DAYS AND MONDAYS and Tuesdays, and Wednesdays, and 

Thursdays. . .seem to have become quite customary at Clarion this fall. 

Photo by David Schorr, Staff Photographer 



Bennett that colleges cost 
much more than the value of 
the education they deliver. 

According to a Media (Gen- 
eral Poll released in August, 
60 percent thought private col- 
leges cost too much, and 51 
percent said public college tui- 
tion was too high. 

The College Board esti- 
mated in August that students 
will spend an average of $4,104 
for public higher education 
during the 1987-88 school year. 

This is the seventh straight 
year in which colleges have 
raised tuition in faster than 
the inflation rate. The overall 
tuition situation prompted 
Bennett to renew his attack on 
campus administrators. 

But according to a Chroni- 
cle of Higher Education sur- 
vey, most Americans worried 
about rocketing education 
costs think higher education is 
more expensive than it actual- 
ly is, or have no idea of its 
cost. 

Those who responded to the 
survey estimated public 4- 
year institution costs to be 
$9,120. The College Board re- 
ported public tuition of a resi- 
dent student to be an averaged 
$5,789. 

According to Kenneth Gru- 
gle, CUP Financial Aid Direc- 
tor, "State owned university 
tuition is a very fair price to 
pay. . .it's the best value for 
your dollar." 

CUP in-state tuition for the 
1987-88 academic year totals 
$1,830. By adding room, 
board, and miscellaneous 
fees, the actual cost of attend- 
ing CUP is $4,148. The actual 
cost is then inflated by the uni- 
versity to include extra expen- 



ses, books and supplies, trans- 
portation, and personal ex- 
penses, resulting in a total 
budget figure of $5,425. (An in- 
flated total budget figure also 
results in increased financial 
aid for the student. ) 

In all, students, parents, 
state legislatures, and the fed- 
eral government will spend 
$124 million on higher edu- 
cation this year, Bennett 
figured in his annual back-to- 
school report on August 26. 
"The American people have 
made a tremendous financial 
committment to education," 
Bennett said. "It's time we 
started getting a much better 
return in that investment." 

The accusation angers edu- 
cators who say they must 
raise tuition to help compen- 
sate for cuts in the money they 
get from state and the federal 
governments. Additional 
money from the tuition raises 
go to pay for long delayed 
building maintenance and to 
raise faculty salaries which 



have been almost stagnent 
since 1972. 

"In some cases, universities 
have knowingly increased 
their tuition because of finan- 
cial aid increases in the 70's," 
said Grugle. But he does not 
believe this was the case at 
CUP. 

An independent study 
released by Research Asso- 
ciates of Washington noted 
that public campuses have 
kept their own education costs 
to increases of just four per- 
cent. 

Grugle sympathises with 
CUP students. "I would like to 
see tuition stay stable." 

Although tuition costs seem 
overwhelming, CUP is hitting 
record highs in financial aid 
awards this year. Pell and 
PHEAA grants, loans, and 
scholarship awards at CUP 
total nearly $11 million. That 
total will soon exceed $12 mil- 
lion, said Grugle, the highest 
financial aid award total in 
CUP'S history. 



Spring Break shortened 



by LisaHampe, 
News Staff Writer 



A few changes have been 
made in the Academic Calen- 
dar this year. The most signi- 
ficant change being in the 
spring break schedule. 

Last year spring break con- 
sisted of nine days in March 
and five days in April for Eas- 
ter, lliis year, spring break 
consists of 11 days in March 
and two days in April for 
Easter. 

Another change made was 



the shortening of the 
Christmas break. Last year it 
was approximately five weeks 
long; this year it is approxi- 
mately four weeks. 

Each school is required to 
have 75 days of school per 
semester including finals 
week. All changes in the Aca- 
demic Calendar are made 
through the President's office. 
The President approves the 
changes and forwards the new 
calendar to Faculty Senate for 
final approval. 



Financial Aid 
tagged witii conditions 

News — Page 5 



Coiiege and Rax have 
sometliing in common 

Features — Page 11 



Weeicly 
Crossword Puzzle 

Features — Page 17 



Lady Spikers win 
Clarion Classic 

Sports — Page 19 



i 



2-THE CLARION CALL, Clarion, PA, Thursday, Sept. 24, 1987 




Unwanted Children 

by Deborah M. Schofleld 
Editor in Chief, Clarion Call 

AIDS, the number one public health problem in the United States 
today, will claim an estimated 125,000 victims of all ages in 1991. 

Today, in 1987, our society is unable to deal with the disease and 
its unfortunate victims. 

So many Americans know little about AIDS (Acquired Immune De- 
ficiency Syndrome) that they fear those whom have contracted the 
disease particularly children. 

An informal assessment of ADS cases in schools, conducted by 
the National Education Association (NEA), revealed that there are 684 
cases of young people under the age of 19 who have contracted AIDS. 
TTie U.S. Public Health Services estimates that by 1991, 3,000 children 
will have the disease and that virtually all will die. 

Young people can become infected with the AIDS virus by being 
sexually abused, from contaminated blood products, from intravenous 
drug use, from sexual behavior, and from transmission to a fetus. 

In most cases, it is not the child's choice to contract ADS, but the 
result of a choice made by some adult in his or her life. But the ADS 
virus, rejection, and the threat of death are things the children have to 
live and deal with. 

What's becoming an epidemic though, is the rampant fear and 
violence scared parents are exerting as they protest children with ADS 
attending school. Three hemophiliac brothers, who contracted the ADS 
virus yet tried to attend a Florida school, got their house burned down. 
The family left town. 

The dilemma of children with ADS in school is inescapable. Our so- 
ciety is dealing with the problem, alright. But is violence the answer? No. 

And should children with ADS be allowed to go to school and at- 
tend classes? Although each case should be considered separately, the 
guidelines issued by the Federal Centers for Disease Control say that the 
benefits of an ADS child attending school outweigh the "apparent non- 
existant" risk to others. Although more is yet to be discovered about 
ADS, doctors are convinced that in many cases, children with ADS 
can safely go to school with other children and the virus would not be 
transferred. I tend to agree. As long as there is no great risk, why should 

(See Life. . .Page 9) 



(^The Clarion Call 

\Jy Room 1 Harvey Hall 

Clarion University of Pennsylvania 
X^. Clarion, Pennsylvania 16214 

n B Phone 814-226-2380 

■ ■HI 
■■■■■■■ 

THE STAFF 

Editor In Chief DEBORAH M. SCHOFIELD 

News Editor LIZ M. KOONES 

Features Editor MARIA L. KAPSAK 

Sports Editor DAVID M. MAHAFFEY 

Ad Design Editor CHRISTINE JANEC2EK 

Ad Sales Manager RICHARD W. FAIRBEND 

Business Manager MICHAEL P. BAUER 

Adviser ART BARLOW 

Photography Editor MIKE BORDO 

Circulation Manager PETER B. McMILLEN 

Copy Editor VONDA SWARTS 

I 

The Clarion Call is published every Thursday during the school year in accordance with the school 
calendar. Editors accept contributions to their sections from any source, but reserve the right to edit 
all copy for libel, taste, style and length. 

The absolute deadline tor editorial copy Is 12:00 noon on Monday. 

The opinions expressed m the editorials are those of the writers and not necessarily the opinion 
of the university or of the student body. 

Advertising Rates: Mail Subscription Rates: 

Display Ads: Per Column Inch $4.50 Per Semester $5 

Per Academic Year $8 

American Scholastic Press Association 
jt r^ Yy ^ ^ Award Winner 

A ^ ^ X -/ -1/ Funded by Student Activity Fee 



HIDE PA 





MR.C.REOTT 

You know, I'm really glad that the 
Constitution is getting some recog- 
nition this year. 

Even though the state and federal 
governments have whittled away at 
it until the whole crew that signed it 
are rolling in their graves like hori- 
zontal tops, I've got to admit that 
I've been able to enjoy this life to the 
fullest. Where else could you live 
through multiple eras? Society in 
America has the freedom to change, 
and that's great. As a result, I've got 
a collection of memories that will 
last forever. Growing up in America 
was great. Wasn't it? 

I was in third grade when Kennedy 
was assassinated, and I can still re- 
member the principal coming into 
the classroom to relay the sorry 
news. We went home early that day, 
and there was nothing else on tele- 
vision for what seemed like weeks. 
Then Ruby shot Oswald right on 
television. What a shock. We're still 
trying to sort out the truth. 

Man walked on the moon for the 
first time, just like out of a comic 
book, and some people insisted it 
was a fake, but it was wonderful. 



Norm's Dorm 



A Private Bicentennial Celebration 



Vietnam was there too. The news- 
papers were constantly printing up- 
dates on the war; television news- 
casts were always full of shots of 
helicopters and troops. 

Protests and demonstrations were 
at their peak, and the youth of 
America had a common cause draw- 
ing them together. Yes, there were 
Peaceniks, and Hippies, and Flower 
Children and the like. Yes, youth 
were finally voicing their opinions 
and were being seen and heard. 

They didn't always have smooth 
sailing though. The tragedy at Kent 
State will probably never be for- 
gotten. 

Those were exciting days though. 
Days of bell-bottom jeans and long 
hair. Hey, how about guys wearing 
clogs? I was skinny then, and had 
the second longest hair in my high 
school. It was well past my shoul- 
ders, and, as you might expect, I had 
my share of rude remarks from the 
multitude of rednecks that were 
around. 

My first beer, my first cigarette, 
my first kiss, my first steady. They 
were all a part of growing up. How 
could you ever forget things like 
that? Columbian was unheard of, 
but Redbud and Jamaican were pop- 
ular. Mexican wasn't such dirtweed 
either. 

Yea, Woodstock was in the air, 
and Joplin; Hendrix; and Crosby, 
Stills, Nash and Young were going 
strong. It was a time filled with rock 
festivals and nights of cruisin'. 

The Beatles released "Let It Be" 
as their last album together, and 
there was talk of Yoke's influence 
over John. It's too bad, there might 
never be another combination of mu- 
sicians that mesh as well as they did. 

Long walks, through breezy sum- 
mer nights, were the way to go with 
the young ladies, and who could for- 
get the fresh smell of the summer 
air, and the way the wind gently 
blew wisps of hair across their faces. ^ 

Street dances were popular then, 
and organs with their leslies 



screaming was the rock style then. 

Music began to get heavier 
though, and Led Zeppelin and Black 
Sabbath were becoming popular. Oh 
yea, I can't leave out Deep Purple 
and "Smoke on the Water." 

Hangin' out at the Dairy Bar was a 
big thing too. It closed up though. I 
guess they couldn't make much 
money from guys just standing 
around. 

Hitchhiking was popular too, but 
who can ya trust anymore? 

How about when the parents went 
on vacation? Party time. Right? 
What a hassle trying to get the house 
cleaned up before they got home. 




Someone always had to barf in an in- 
convenient place. Something always 
got busted, too. Didn't it? Elmer's 
Glue just never seemed to do a per- 
fect job. I used to think it was just 
my inability to use the stuff. 

Something sort of happens then. 
Friends get married or move away. 
All contact is lost and for all we 
know the people that were a major 
part of our lives for so long could be 
dead. 

There are many more memories, 
but there just isn't enough room to 
put them all down. Some just aren't 
meant to be written though. They're 
sort of private. Just for our own per- 
sonal memory collection. 

Is it any wonder that men have 
dreamed of making time machines 
and going back one more time? 
Well, I guess you can't ever go home 
again. Those days are long gone, but 
the memories of our prior exper- 

(SeeParl<. . ..Page 9) 



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THE CLARION CALL, Clarion, PA, Thursday, Sept. 24, 1987-3 



The Call Mailbox 



White Arts Response 

Dear Editor, 

I would like to address some of the 
comments made by Dr. Girvan in the 
Sept. 17 issue of The Call. 

First of all I don't understand why 
Dr. Girvan inserted words into a 
quotation. If my source has said that 
White Arts was a party for "(white) 
students" I would have written it 
that way. The fact is that my source 
did not say that and Dr. Girvan has 
not right to assume that he meant 
that. 

Second, Dr. Girvan assumes that I 
contacted a "few white students' 
and gathered all my information 
from them. WRONG, I talked to 
many minority students that attend 
Qarion University. I can assure Dr. 
Girvan that none of the minority stu- 
dents that I interviewed, while 
covering the White Arts story, felt 
that ". . .such a name and the pres- 
ent structure of these parties are ra- 
cist in consequence." If anyone 
would have said anything to this ef- 
fect I would have reported it. 

Third, Dr. Girvan quotes part of a 
sentence from the article to make a 
point. I would like the readers to 
know that there was a misprint in 
the sentence he quoted from and if it 
is looked at in context, not as a par- 
tial quote, the correct meaning can 
be realized. The quote that Dr. 
Girvan uses is from the printed sen- 
tence; "The people instrumental in 
setting up White Arts admit that 
they are fond of the name and have 
considered changing it." The sen- 
tence was originaUy written and 
should have been printed this way; 
"The people instrumental in setting 
up White Arts admit that they are 
not fond of the name and have con- 
sidered changing it." 



Finally, I must point out that 
White Arts parties are "open to ev- 
eryone." Dr. Girvan should not de- 
clare this as false unless he has at- 
tended White Arts functions himself. 
Please don't misunderstand me. 
I'm not a racist nor do I condone ra- 
cism. In addition, I welcome con- 
structive criticism where my report- 
ing is concerned. What I am object- 
ing to is Dr. Girvan's apparent at- 
tack of my objectivity. 

The White Arts article was written 
based on facts from research and 
should be read as a report of the 
facts. Anyone who questions this 
should have valid evidence to 
support their statements. Dr. 
Girvan has nothing, as I have shown, 
to support his claims. 

I would like it to be known that I 
am a reporter. I report the facts and 
nothing needs to be assumed from 
my writing. 
Sincerely, 
Corinne Lysle 
EDITOR'S NOTE: As a Oarion Uni- 
versity campus newspaper, it is our 
objective to serve ALL the students. 
We regret when someone believes 
we have failed to accomplish this 
objective, but I feel I am warranted 
to commend Ms. Lysle on her ob- 
jective reporting, as it Is a high held 
policy of the Clarion Call. 

Parking Reply 

To Whichever Employee 
It May Concern: 

I would also like to thank Public 
Safety for the nice ticket which I re- 
ceived at the beginning of this se- 
mester. I think, though, that you may 
need a little correction about favor- 
itism that Public Safety may engage 
in in r^ards to parking. I have 
NEVER been notified of a pending 
ticket, before the fact, during my 



four years here as a student at our 
beloved Campus on the Hill. I think 
your analysis of the situation is 
completely incorrect, in light of my 
personal experiences anyways. 
Besides why should you who "just 
work here" get any breaks regard- 
ing parking when we who help pay 
your salaries aren't given any spe- 
cial consideration either. Not only 
am I a student but, also, I am a 
member of our housing staff and I 
still receive no special treatment. 

Sincerely, 

Billie Best 

Closing Protest 

Dear Editor: 

The campus library has long been 
a source of quality information and a 
place to escape into complete silence 
while studying. As members of the 
Clarion University fraternity and 
sorority systems, we often take ad- 
vantage of the many services the 
library has to offer. We feel that this 
has greatly contributed to our con- 
tinued success in the field of schol- 
arship. As we are constantly striving 
to achieve the highest scholarship 
possible, we would find a decision to 
close the library daily at 9 p.m. very 
unwise. For the good of our future 
leaders, both fraternal and other- 
wise, we recommend that the 
library remain open the later hours. 

Sincerely, 

Cynthia Karpaw and 

Tim Trone 

Distorted Reality 

Dear Editor: 

The article written by the lUP Of- 
fice of Media Relations which ap- 
peared in the Call (9/17/87) entitled 
"Behind the Iron Curtain" distorted 
reality. Clarion participates in an 
exchange program with Janus Pan- 
(SeeMail. . .Page 4) 




Dear Ann Frances, 

I have a little bit of a dilemma. I 
really Uke this guy. I'd like to see 
him more than I do (I see him once a 
week if I'm lucky). I just want to get 
to know him better. I'm not even 
looking for anything close to com- 
mitment. The thing that I'm scared 
about is I don't want to call him or 



9. 



anything because I can tell he's the 
type that doesn't like to be chased. 
How am I going to be able to get to- 
gether with him. 

Signed, 

On the Edge 

Dear Edge, 

Since you realize he doesn't want 
to be chased, you are smart for not 
making a pest out of yourself. The 
best thing to do is to ask him to help 
you with a particular class, prefer- 
ably one the two of you have in 
common. 

If he sounds interested then make 
definite plans to study together. If he 



has an excuse that sounds legiti- 
mate, tell him to caU YOU when he 
has the time to study. If he just says 
no, then find yourself someone who 
is worth studying with. 
I hope everything works out. 
Ann 



If you have a problem and you 
think you need someone who 
knows how to solve it. . .write to 
Ann Frances, she'll do it for you! 
Send your letters to The Clarion 
Call office, c/o Ann Frances. 10.S 
Riemer Center, Clarion. She's 
waiting to hear from you I 



AUTUMN HAS ARRIVED. . .Ann Yost and Andy Tanner enjoy the last filtering of Indian summer's last rays. 

Photo by Mike Bordo, Photography Editor 




Ideas and thoughts are 
accepted and encouraged 
as letters to the editor. 
All contributions should 
be made to the Clarion Call 
office, 1 HarveyHo.il. All 
letters must be signed, 
but names will be with- 
held upon request. 



4-THE CLARION CALL, CiTlon, PA, Thursday, Sept. 24, 1987 



THE CLARION CALL, Clarion, PA, Thursday. Sept. 24, 1987-5 



WANT TO BUY? 
NEED TO SELL? 

ADVERTISE IN 
OUR CLASSIFIEDS. . 



20 Words 
ror$l 
at Clarion 
Call Office, 
1 Harvey Hall 



Classified Ads I 




BUY OR SELL AVON for Christmas 
or anytime. Call 764-3464. 

D & D PLAYERS need DM. New 

game. Must have own books, good 
imagination. On campus 3578 or 
3295. 



FOR SALE: '86 Kawasaki 454 LTD, 
4,000 miles, sharp, make offer. 
Black Hawk variable compound 
bow. Just in time for archery sea- 
son. $70. Great Buy. Brian 226- 
1947. 

GOOD LUCK GUYS on Saturday at 
California. . .From your biggest 
fans - Clarion University Cheer- 
leaders. 

LAST CHANCE ATHLETES to buy 

a T-shirt from a cheerleader. They 
are almost gone. 




iZiA ia£ 



612 MAIN STREET 

CLARION, PA. 16214 

PHONE: 226-7970 

$2.00 OFF 



Champ 
Pizza 



WITH THIS COUPON 

ONE COUPON PER PIZZA 

NOT VALID IN COMBINATION WITH ANY OTHER OFFER 



EXPIRES 12/31/87 



HOURS: 

SUN. - THURS. 

11:00 • MIDNIGHT 

FRI.&SAT. 

11:00-1:00 



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DRUMMER and KEYBOARD play- 
er needed for established Heavy 
Metal Band. Serious inquiries 
only. Call Scott at 226-5018. 

CUP STUDENTS having problems 
finding the correct supplies for 
your typewriter. Call Clarion Of- 
fice Equipment, Rt. 66 S., 226- 
8740. 

ATTENTION! LOST: Silver S-Link 
bracelet at the Roost on Thurs., 
Sept. 17. Reward, Sentamental 
Value! ! ! Call 226-3583 or 226-2380. 

THANK YOU. . .to my lovely assist- 
and (Susan) "Emily & Co." for all 
your help with developing and 
printing of the last issue of The 
Call. Love ya, Mike 

EARN Ihundred weeklyl in your 
spare time. United Services of 
America is looking for home work- 
ers to perform mail services. In- 
centive programs available. For 
information send large self-ad- 
dressed stamped envelope to 
U.S.A. 24307 Magic Mtn. Pkwy., 
Suite No. 306, Valencia, CA 91355. 




Should children with AIDS be al- 
lowed to attend public school? Of 
course they should. 

Surgeon General C. Everett Koop 
said in an interview, "I would send 
my children to school with children 
who have AIDS. And I feel that ab- 



ious and extensive health problem. In 
the panic, we seem to have forgotten 
that its victims are human beings, 
some of which have contracted the 
disease through no fault of their own. 

So why deny a child, who has con- 
tracted the disease, through a bad 
blood transfusion or birth, the right to 
an education, to make friends, to lead 
the life of a normal child. 

Tlie National Education Associa- 



solutely firmly." 

•rtie Surgeon General's report on tion launched a program to educate 
AIDS stated that none of the iden- young children about AIDS. They 



tified cases of AIDS in the United 
States is known or suspected to have 
been transmitted from one child to 
another in school, day care, or foster 
care. 

So why are there so many reports 
of parents having to remove their 
AIDS infected children from schools, 
of young victims being ostracized 
from their homes and communities, 
and of families of victims being har- 
rassed and threatened by an un- 
feeling society. 

One reason, I feel, is fear. AIDS has 
brought with it fear of the unknown. 
Iliis country is facing its most ser- 



are aiming to stop the spread of the 
disease and to stop fears about being 
in class with a child with the disease. 
This is a step in the right direction. 

It all comes down to education. If 
everyone knows the facts about 
AIDS, then a lot of the fears will be 
dispelled. 

Coming to grips with AIDS, to 
many people, is a long process. It 
begins by thinking and talking, and 
evolves into action. 

In our struggle to understand 
AIDS, we must remember that its 
victims are people, and they have 
rights. 



States.... 



a check on the university's 
progress since going throi^h 
the 10-year accreditation. 
Clarion University was last 
accredited in 1982. 

The five-year review is a 
check on the goals and plans 
made in the 10-year accredita- 
tion report. Dr. Eddington 
said, "They are asking the 
university 'Are you doing 



(Continued from Page 1) 



doing?'." 

A committee of 25 people, 
comprised of students, facul- 
ty, administration, and trus- 
tees, was chosen by President 
Bond and Eddington. The 
committees were broken 
down to report on eight differ- 
ent areas of the universitv, 
which included student enroll- 
ment, planning, goals and ob- 



what you said you would be jectives, use of instruments, 

and budgeting. "Hie eight com- 
mittees wrote initial drafts 
which were finalized into a 
complete report by Prof. Ed- 
ward Grejda, of the English 
Department. 

The report, which was 150 
pages plus a large appendix of 
documents, took about a year 



f ^4^*>'* 



to be completed. Planning has 
already begun on the 1991 re- 
accreditation report, which 
takes about two years to com- 
plete. 

According to Eddington, if a 
college or university is not ac- 
credited, credits will not 
transfer to other universities. 
"It is vital to students that the 
institution becomes state ac- 
credited." Accreditation helps 
in both the quantity and qual- 
ity of students and in attracting 
faculty, said Eddington. 

If an institution is not up to 
par, the commission will give 
them 18 months to present a 
new, favorable report. If the 
report is still unacceptable, 



/^t 



Spaghetti Night 



they lose their accreditation. 

I VI Cl 1 1 U w/V ■ ■ ■ ■(Continued from Page 3) 

support the Clarion/ Janus Pannon- 
ius student exchange program. 

The story printed in the Call ap- 
parently continues a long tradition 
of lUP institutional braggadocio, 
some of it justified, some not. 

Stephen K. Ainsworth, Ph.D. 
Director, International 
Programs 
(More Mail. . .See Page 23) 



nonius University (as does lUP). 
The Clarion Office of International 
Programs selects the American stu- 
dents who travel to Hungary, they 
register at Clarion University, and 
pay fees to Clarion University. 

We also select the Hungarian stu- 
dents who come to our campus and 
have received a grant from the 
Soros Foundation in New York to 



is back again . . . 

Every Thursday, 4-7 p.m. 

All-you-can-eat 

with bread and pop ' 

Don't forget our Gryo Special 



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DIHfiB0t9 



522 Main St. 
226-8222 




2.25 



GET ACQUAINTED OFFER 

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DOWNSTAIRS, RIEMER 
226-2406 



8 People 

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Limit 



Valid 10 for 

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Coupon Good 

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7 days a week 

until Sept. 30 



>■■ 



NEWS 




McKeever offers students outdoor ed. 



by Charla Frank 
News Staff Writer 



The McKeever Center is of- 
fering a course entitled Mo- 
dern Concepts of Outdoor 
Education, that will give 
upperclass education majors 
a chance to experience the 
great outdoors. 

This center sponsors a two- 
week student teaching course 



in the spring, during public 
school session. This gives 
Clarion students a chance to 
teach school children the 
knowledge and appreciation 
of their environment. 

The McKeever staff 
believes that environmental 
education stresses an aware- 
ness with the natural world. 
The staff emphasizes such 
topics as the flow of energy 



Aid receivers must 
meet conditions 



In order to continue receiv- 
ing financial aid following 
initial enrollment at Clarion 
University of Pennsylvania, 
students must meet certain 
conditions each year. They 
must be enroUed for at least 
part-time and must reapply 
for aid each year using the ap- 
propriate forms as mentioned 
above. Baccalaureate stu- 
dents may receive assistance 
from most federal. Title IV, 
and state aid programs for 
each of their undergraduate 
years providing that they 
maintain "normal academic 
progress." Tliis means 'that 
undergraduate students must 
successfully complete a mini- 
mum of 24 semester hours by 
the end of each academic 
year, including the summer, 
before they can be granted as- 
sistance for their next school 
year. 

Part-time undergraduate 
students must successfully 
complete a minimum of 12 se- 
mester hours during each aca- 
demic year, including the 
summer, to continue 
receiving any financial assis- 
tance. 

Graduate students must 
successfully complete 18 se- 
mester hours by the end of 
each academic year, 
each academic year, includ- 
ing the summer, before they 
can be granted assistance for 
their next school year. 

Part-time graduate stu- 
dents must successfully com- 
plete nine semester hours dur- 
ing each academic year, in- 
cluding the sunmier, to con- 
tinue receiving any financial 
assistance. 

For financial aid purposes 
an undergraduate student be- 
comes a Sophomore after 
completing 24 semester hours, 
a Junior with 48, and a Senior 
with 72. Itiese credit levels for 
class standing apply to finan- 
cial aid only and not to other 
academic considerations. Stu- 
dents should also understand 
that completing 24 semester 



hours per year will not qualify 
them for graduation in four 
years but rather in 11 semes- 
ters. Freshmen and Sopho- 
mores that have a 2.0 QPA or 
are officially permitted to 
attend Calrion, may continue 
to receive financial assistance 
as long as the 24 semester 
hour progress requirement is 
being met. Once a student 
earns 64 semester hours, 
Junior standing for gradua- 
tion requirements, he/she 
must maintain a 2.0 cumula- 
tive QPA to continue to re- 
ceive any Title IV financial 
assistance in addition to com- 
pleting 24 semester hours 
each year. (The 2.0 QPA re- 
quirement will become effec- 
tive with the Freshmen Qass 
of 1991). 

A student denied financial 
aid for any reason may appeal 
the denial as follows : 

1. Write to the Office of Fi- 
nancial Aid, Clarion Univer- 
sity of Pennsylvania, Clarion, 
PA 16214, noting the denial 
and stating the reasons why fi- 
nancial aid should not be de- 
nied. Example: A student 
may be denied aid because it 
appears he/she has fewer 
than 24 credits for the year. 
Perhaps during the sunmier 
at another institution the stu- 
dent has earned, for transfer 
to Qarion, credits which will 
fulfill the normal progress re- 
quirement but about which the 
University has not been in- 
formed. The student may pre- 
sent the appeal in person at 
the Ctffice of Financial Aid in 
Egbert Hall instead of writing. 

2. The Office of Financial 
Aid will review the denial in 
terms of information provided 
by the student. 

3. FoUowing the review the 
Office of Financial Aid will 
report back to the student con- 
cerning the apn3al. 

4. If the student questions 
the decision of the Office of 
Financial Aid an aroeal may 
be made to the Vice-President 
of Student Affairs for a final 
determination. 



and resources, cycling of ma- 
terials, land use, pollution, 
and agriculture. 

According to Dr. Sylvia 
Stalker, an Education profes- 
sor at Clarion, teachers should 
encourage students to take 



care of the world around us, 
otherwise we as a society will 
continue to abuse and destroy 
our world. "I believe that our 
environment needs to be re- 
spected and taken care of," 
said Stalker. 



McKeever is an environ- 
mental learning center locat- 
ed on hour south of Clarion. 
Anyone interested in par- 
ticipating in this course can 
contact Dr. Sylvia Stalker in 
112 Stevens Hall. 




Internship given in competition 



by Deborah M. Schofield, 

Editor in Chief 

The James A. Finnegan 
Fellowship Foundation re- 
cently announced its 28th an- 
nual competition for the 
James A. Finnegan Fellow- 
ship Foundation Awards. 

the Foundation Award con- 
sists of a 10-week internship to 
be served in a state govern- 
ment agency during June 1 
through August 15, 1988. Each 
Foundation Award provides a 
stipend of $2,500. 

A limited number of Special 
Awards, $100 each, which also 
provide an opportunity for 
summer internships will be 
awarded. Recipients of the 
Special Awards will also at- 
tend weekly seminar meet- 
ings along with recipients of 
Foundation Awards. 

Any Pennsylvania student 
enrolled for at least one 
semester as an undergraduate 
at an accredited college or 
university, or any non-resi- 
dent student similarly en- 
rolled at an accredited Pa. 
college or university, who is 
considering a career in gov- 
ernment or politics is eligible 
to participate. Anyone pre- 



viously a winner of a Foun- 
dation Award or Special 
Award is not eligible. 

The Foundation was estab- 
lished to provide training in 
government and politics for 
outstanding students in Penn- 
sylvania colleges and uni- 
versities. 



For application forms, write 
to: 1988 Contest Coordinator, 
The James A. Finnegan Fel- 
lowship Foundation, P.O. Box 
591, Harrisburg, PA 17108- 
0591. 

All applications must be 
postmarked by February 15, 
1988. 



CAIMPUS CALENDAR 

ACADEMIC AND INFORMATIONAL 

Sept. 24: Learning Skills Lab Workshop, "Good Notetaking," 

Chandler Faculty Dining Haii, 12:10 p.m. 
Sept. 26: High School Visitation Day 
Sept. 28: Faculty Senate Meeting, 140 Peirce, 4 p.m. 

Sign-up for Senior Yearbook pictures (near 126 Riemer) 
Sept. 29: AthleticDept. "Time Out" luncheon (Holiday inn), 12 noon 

Sign up for Senior Yearbook pictures (near 126 Riemer) 

Learning Skills Lab Workshop, "Reading Your Text," 

203 Davis, 3:30 p.m. 
Sept. 30: Sign up for Senior Yearbook pictures (near 126 Riemer) 

Learning Skills Lab Workshop, "Reading Your Text," 
Chandler Faculty Dining Hall, 12:10 p.m. 

Weekly Jumaa meeting at 1:00, Campbell basement, room 40. 

Sept. 25: CB movie "An American Tail" Mar.-Boyd Aud., 8 p.m. 

ROTC Whitewater rafting 
Sept. 26: Kolnonia Concert, Mar.-Boyd Aud., 8 p.m. 

CAB'S Harvey Multi-Purpose Room, 9:30 p.m. 
Sept. 27: ALF Week begins 

Gala concert for the President, Mar.-Boyd Aud., 3:15 p.m. 

CB movie "An American Tall," Mar.-Boyd Aud., 8 p.m. 

Sandford Gallery Exhibit, Mary Hamilton prints, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. 
Mon.-Frl. and 2 p.m.-4 p.m. Sun. (Continues through Oct. 16) 
Sept. 30: Faculty Recital - Mr. Vahe Berberian, cello, Mar.-Boyd Aud., 

8:15 p.m. 

Ask A "Stupid" Question Day 



6-THE CLARION CALL, Clarion. PA, Thursday. Sept. 24. 1987 




Dry rush helps Greek image 



by Kris BUmmel 
News Staff Writer 



ALL DRIED UP — With the start of an all-dry rush system, fraternity mem- 
bers will no longer be rolling out the kegs for their rush parties. 

Clarion Call File Photo 



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Hiere has been a big change 
in the Greek System this se- 
mester. Instead of the tra- 
ditional wet Rush parties, the 
Greeks have started an all 
Dry Rush policy all guys who 
are interested in joining a fra- 
ternity. 

Past Interfratemity Council 
President (IFC), Paul M. 
Zollinger, said this was 
started in order to "provide a 
better atmosphere for the 
campus, students, adminis- 
tration and the community as 
a whole." The Greek System 
wanted to gain more of a posi- 
tive image. It had gotten to a 
point where the Greeks were 
just a group of beer-drinking 
men. Zolliniger said that the 
Greeks are not just that. "The 
system provides a lot of good 
things to the campus, stu- 
dents, and the community, 
and it is only when something 
bad happens that the Greeki 
become stereotyped." Last 
year they tried to limit the 
number of people at Wet Rush 



# 

# 
# 

# 

# 
# 

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# 

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parties by giving out a certain 
number of tickets to ^ys in- 
terested in a fraternity. Un- 



"The system provides 
a lot of good things to 
the campus, students, 
and the community. . . 
—Paul Zollinger, 
past IFC president 



fortunately, the problem was 
still not solved. 
Zollinger said that although 



the Greeks had to push rush 
harder and be more creative 
this semester, he has heard 
only positive remarks con- 
cerning Dry Rush. Between 
10-25 males have been coming 
to the parties and that is a 
favorable turnout. Only males 
interested in becoming a 
member of Greek Life are at- 
tending. 

Zollinger hopes and feels 
very confident the Greek Sj^- 
tem will continue this wav 
from now on. He says, "Al- 
though this is a big change for 
Clarion, people will adjust to 
it, and it will be a change for 
the better." 



Directory excludes 
professors' numbers 



by LuAnn Zeigler, 
News Staff Writer 



DERY 



CUSTOM 



The Campus Directory, 
which lists students' names, 
phone numbers, addresses 
and other pertinent infor- 
mation about our campus, is 
due to be delivered October 
19. The Student Affairs office 
hopes to have the directories 
available at this time without 
any delays. 

There was a controversy 
concerning the issue of 
whether to publish profes- 
sors' phone numbers in the di- 
rectory, making them avail- 
able to the students. Accord- 
ing to Debra Boyles, Secre- 
tary to the Vice President of 
Student Affairs, there was a 
"miscommunication about 
the professors' numbers being 
in the student directory." She 
says that professors' numbers 
will not be published. 

Information for the direc- 
tory is obtained from the com- 
puter center, which is based 
on forms that a student com- 
pletes before returning to 
school at the end of the sum- 
mer. The address changes are 
updated further by complet- 



ing change-of-address forms 
in Egbert Hall. Debra Boyles 
wanted to stress the impor- 
tance of "providing a local ad- 
dress and making sure the 
forms are completed correct- 
ly to save time. 

The student part of the 
directory is generated by the 
Student Affairs Office. Ad- 
dresses and phone numbers of 
students are provided because 
other students want to contact 
them and also because of 
mailings that they will receive 
from the University. The 
Family Privacy Act allows 
protection for some confiden- 
tiality in printing student ad- 
dresses and phone numbers. 

JOB BULLETIN 

Internship/Summer Job Bulletins 
are available in Career Placement 
Services at the beginning of each 
month. Listed are the positions that 
employers let us know about. 

MALER.A's 

Additional Male Resident Assist- 
ants are needed for Fall '87. Appli- 
cations may be picked up in 210 Eg- 
bert Hall. Applications accepted until 
positions are filled. Apply early ! 




Senate plans 
Riemer renovations 



THE CLARION CALL, Clarion, PA, Thursday, Sept. 24, 1987—7 



by Tara Ramirez, 
News Staff Writer 



Council Food and Housing 

Representatives have been 
— elected in Wilkinson, Camp- 
Student Senate President beU and Nair. There will be a 
Kent O'Neil updated the sena- meeting for all representa- 
tors on the mitiation of the tives in the next week. Also 
plans to renovate Riemer Cen- concerning housing, they re- 
ter at Tuesday's meeting. Tlie ported there is definite posi- 
senate is currently waiting for tive feedback on the approval 
the appointment of an archi- of the 11 a.m.-ll p.m. visita- 
tect by the Department of tion hours. 
General Services in Harris- Committees on Committees 
burg, before developing the related that October 1 is the 
plans. President O'Neil also due date for conmiittee posi- 
mentioned that Harvey Hall tion applications and that 
may possibly be included in interviews will be taking place 
the new renovation plans. that week. They plan to have 
TWis Friday and Saturday, all of the positions appointed 
President O'Neil will be at- by October 7. 
tending the Board of Student At last Tuesday's meeting. 
Government Presidents' Muni Benjamin, student trus- 
meeting at Shippensburg Urn- tee, suggested to put lights up 
versity of Pennsylvania. All of on thebasketball courts out- 
the presidents from the 14 side Nair Hall. She spoke to 
Pennsylvania State System of Mr. Crawford who said that 
Higher Education schools will this is a definite possibility for 
be present. According to Pres- a spring project, 
ident O'Neil, they will discuss Also (fiscussed at the Stu- 
any topic that concerns the dent Senate meeting was the 



student bodies from all of the 
14 schools as a whole. 
University President Dr. 



need for a new representative 
from the Student Senate to go 
to the Faculty Senate meet- 
Thomas Bond made a special ings every other Monday, 
visit to the Student Senate itie Rules and Regulations 
meeting. He announced that committee discussed the prob- 
all of the senators will be ex- lem with non-recognized 
tended an invitation for dinner organizations posting signs on 
with the Council of Trustees campus. Dr. Bond stated 
on November 11 . there is no rule against the or- 

Dr. Bond also stated that he ganizations' signs at present, 

will begin visiting each of the Another topic which arose 

dorms in two to tiiree weeks. during the meeting was the 

Vice President Dean Rank possibility of having Riemer 

reported that the senate will self sufficient. This meaning 

receive a typewriter for Stu- that all of the profits which 

dent Senate business. They Riemer brou^t in could be 

hope to have the typewriter by used by the center instead of 

next week. being put into a fund. Presi- 

The Food and Housing Com- dent 0*NeU said he would look 

mittee reported that the Hall into this matter. 

Students think 
little about sex 




NEW YORK, N.Y. (CPS) - 
College and high school stu- 
dents don't think about sex as 
often as most people assume, 
researchers have round. 

Researchers presenting pa- 
pers at the annual meeting of 
the American Psychological 
Association Aug. 30, in fact, 
said students ttunk about sex 
only about 1 percent of the 
time. 

"Tlus may be surprising," 
concluded Eric Klinger, a psy- 
chology professor at the uni- 
versity of Minnesota who out- 
fitted 39 students with beepers 
and had them record what 
they were thinking when they 
got a signal from the devices. 

Studoits spent about 20 per- 
cent of their time thinKing 
about a "task at hand," 14 
percent of their time "just 
looking at or listening to some- 
thing, 6 percent of their time 
"problem-solving," 3 percent 
of their time in "self evalua- 



tion," 2 percent of their time 
"telling themselves what to 
do," 1 percent of their time in 
"anger" and another 1 per- 
cent, at last, thinking about 

Ttje remainder of the stu- 
dents' thoughts concerned 
"other people." 

Students themselves may 
be surprised by the finding, 
added Edward Donner, a Uni- 
versity of Chicago scientist 
whose research also found stu- 
dents don't ttunk about sex aU 
that much. 






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8-THE CLARtON CALL, Clarion. PA, Thursday, Sept. 24, 1987 



Lab improves 
study skills 



by Deborah M. Schofield, 
Editor in Chief 

The Clarion University 
Learning Skills Lab is pre- 
scribing cures through a ser- 
ies of workshops open to all 
students through December. 

Recently relocated to Davis 
Hall, the lab provides many 
services for improving learn- 
ing and study skills. 

The recent move from Eg- 
bert provided the lab with 
more room to hold the work- 
shops, house the lab, and offer 
computer terminals, account- 
ing modules, and a soundproof 
study room. 

Attending the workshops 
give the students an initial 
prescription of a weak study 
skill. Sometime soon after- 
ward, the student is encour- 
aged to return to the lab and 
make an appointment with 
Learning Skills Laboratory 
Coordinator Karen Bring- 
ham. The student's progress 
since the workshop is then in- 



dividually checked with 
Bringham, her graduate as- 
sistant Nancy Maida, or one of 
three student workers. 

The lab is "definitely for ev- 
eryone," and "develops some 
tools for being a better stu- 
dent," said Bringham. "We 
think of ourselves as helpers. " 

For those whose busy sched- 
ules can't fit a workshop, the 
services provide a "Lunch 
and Learn workshop. For an 
hour, students can bring their 
trays into Chandler's faculty 
dining hall and eat while they 
receive instruction. 

Other academic support 
services moved to Davis 
include large group and indi- 
vidual tutoring and math 
workshops. By simply filling 
out a request form in 209A 
Davis, students can make use 
of one of seven tutoring rooms 
and peer instruction free. 

The schedule for the 1987 
Learning Skills Lab Work- 
shops is as foUows: 




THE GRAND CHAPTER OF 

PHI SIGMA KAPPA. 
FOUNDED IN 1873 FOR THE 
PROMOTION OF BROTHER- 
HOOD, THE SIMULATION OF 
SCHOLARSHIP, AND THE 
DEVELOPMENT OF 
CHARACTER. 

The Grand Chapter of Phi Sigma Kappa, 

on behalf of the entire national fraternity, 
extends Its congratulations to the Nu 
Pentagon Chapter, Clarion University of 
Pennsylvania, for being selected as an 
Outstanding Chapter for its alumni Pro- 
grams. 

This honor was presented by the Grand 
President at the fraternity's 1987 conven- 
tion in Long Beach, California. We are 
pleased to recognize Nu Penaton as Out- 
standing Chapter. 





THE CLARION CALL, Clarion, PA, Thursday, Sept. 24, 1987-9 



12:10 



3:30 



12:10 



3:30 



12:10 



3:30 



12:10 



3:30 



12: 10 and 7:00 



Wed. , Sept. 24 Chandler Faculty Dining Hall 
Good Notetaking (Lunch & Learn) 

Tuesday, Sept. 29 Davis Hall, Room 203 
Reading Your Text 

Wed. , Sept. 30 Chandler Faculty Dining Hall 
Reading Your Text (Lunch & Learn) 

Tues.,0ct.6 Davis Hall, Room 203 
Taking Objective Tests 

Wed. , Oct. 7 Chandler Faculty Dining Hall 

Taking Objective Tests (Lunch & Learn) 

Tues., Oct. 13 Davis Hall, Room 203 
Taking Essay Tests 

Wed. , Oct. 14 Chandler Faculty Dining HaU 
Taking Essay Tests (Lunch & Learn) 

Tues. , Oct. 20 Davis Hall, Room 203 
How to pledge and still get your work done 

Wed. , Oct. 21 Chandler Faculty Dining Hall 
How to pledge and still get your work done (Lunch & Learn) 

Tues., Oct. 27 Davis Hall, Room 203 3:30 

Academic Assertiveness (How to talk to your prof workshop) 

Wed. , Oct. 28 Chandler Faculty Dining Hall 12 : 10 

Academic Assertiveness (How to talk to your prof workshop) 
(Lunch and Learn) 

Tues. , Nov. 3 Davis Hall, Room 203 3 : 30 

Motivation, Memory, and Concentration 

Wed. , Nov. 4 Chandler Faculty Dining Hall 12 : 10 

Motivation, Memory and Concentration (Lunch & Learn) 

Tues., Nov. 10 Davis Hall, Room 203 3:30 

How to increase your vocabulary (Get ready for the GRE's) 

Wed. , Nov. 11 Chandler Faculty Dining Hall 12 : 10 

How to increase your vocabulary (Get ready for the GRE's) 
(Lunch & Learn) 

Tues., Dec. 1 : Davis Hall, Room 203 3:30 

Preparing for Finals 

Wed. , Dec. 2 : Chandler Faculty Dining Hall 12 : 10 

Preparing for Finals (Lunch & Learn) 



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NEWS? 

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226-2380 



////////^//////////////^///////ATj'/W/Mi'////////-//////////////////. 




The world is not round. 
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Harrassment problems probed 



LITGa ■ ■ .(Continued from Page 2) 

we condemn the children to a Icwicly life? 

So why are Americans generally unwilling to let these children with 
ADS into the classroom? Because they are undereducated about the 
disease. NEA has recently launched a war against ADS in the public 
schools, using education as the main weapon. But parents need to be 
educated too. Articles on ADS surround us today, but many believe 
they know enough, or read and sift out only that which they think they 
should know. 

ADS victims, especially children, are being treated as voo-doo. They 
are hexed. "They can't be around my son. . .my daughter." "Keep them 
out of the classroom." Lef s stop this histaia and individually declare our 
own war on ADS. Parents and future parents need to educate them- 
selves today so that this condemnation can be stopped. 

r dl Kb ■ ■ ■(Continued from Page 2) 

iences will always be there to America. . . Thanks for the mem- 

~" ories. 

—Mr. C. Reott is a Senior Com- 
munication major. 



comfort and strengthen us. They 
gave us times to laugh and cry 
about. 



Defense Secretary Casper 
Weinberger ordered a task force 
to investigate sexual harrass- 
ment problems in the military. 

The Defense Department wo- 
men's advisory group made a 
study of women in the Navy and 
Marines, which brought about the 
action. The study found that the 
"macho" image that is encour- 
aged in the military contributes 
to behavior that is morally re- 
pugnant and inappropriate. 

Titanic Artifacts 
Removed 

The Titanic has been at the bot- 
tom of the North Atlantic Ocean 
for 75 years now and many people 
think it should be left alone. 

The French explorers, along 
with U.S. explorers, who found 
the Titanic, believe that artifacts 



Bulimia reports inaccurate 



(CPS) — Reports of the bu- 
limia epidemic among col- 
lege-age women are inaccur- 
ate, according to a new study. 

A 1981 survey at one coU^e 
reported bulimia affected as 
many as 19 percent of the 
women on campus, and at 
least one popular magazine 
suggested that half the women 
on campuses suffer from eat- 
ing disorders, according to a 
report in the Journal of the 
American Medical Associa- 
tion. 

However, recent research 
conducted at the University of 
Pennsylvania indicates that 
only about 1.3 percent of fe- 
msde students and 0.1 percent 
of male students actually fit 
the clinical diagnosis of bu- 
limia, or binge-purge 
syndrome. 

"What we found is that a 
very significant number of 
people who respond to these 
surveys are those who are in- 
terestied in eating behaviors, 
and that that group tends to 
overemphasize," said David 
E. Schotte, an assistant pro- 
fessor of psychology at the 
Chicago Medical School. 

"For instance, many report 
that they fast frequently. On 
followup, we found this to 
mean for some that thev skip 
breakfast occasionally. ' 

"Others characterized an 



eating binge as eating a large 
bag of potato chips while 
studying, while bulimics tend 
to consume thousands and 
thousands of calories at one 
time, often in secret, followed 
by self-induced vomiting," 
added Schotte, who co-author- 
ed the Journal report with Dr. 
Albert Stunkard of the Uni- 
versity of Pennsylvania. 

Stunkard said the most im- 
portant factor the researchers 
used to differentiate between 
bulimia and bulimic bdiavior 

Stunkard said the most im- 
portant factor the research- 
ers used to differentiate be-^ 
tween bulimia and bulimic 



behavior was whether the re- 
spondents purged their sys- 
tems after eating — especial- 
ly if a laxative was used. 

"That's where the great 
drop-off between our survey 
and others came." 

College students, because 
of dating and status pres- 
sures, may be more suscept- 
ible to eating disorders, ac- 
cording to the report. 

But, said Schotte, "an oc- 
casional abnormal eating 
pattern or an obsession about 
such patterns is not the same 
thing as a bulimia 
epedunic." 



FROM 

ALL 

POINTS 




Compiled by Vonda Swarts, 
News Staff Writer 

should be brought up from the 
ship. 

The French team brought up 
more than 300 artifacts which will 
be viewed by millions of people. 
Included were chandaliers, 
dishes and pottery. More inter- 



esting artifacts were a bag filled 
with jewels and money and a 
purser's safe, whose opening is 
being broadcast on television 
worldwide on October 28. 

Many people believe that the 
artifacts should be left on board 
to serve as a monument. 

Pope Stirs 
Catholics 

Pope John Paul II caused quite 
a stir among the U.S. Catholics. 
They comment that he is warm 
yet blunt in his dealings with the 
people. 

Although crowds weren't as 
large as expected they were very 
quick to respond to the Pope. One 
reason for the smaller crowds 
was coverage of the Pope by tele- 
vision stations. 

The Pope's visit did remind the 
Catholics of the identity, liturgy, 
and hierarchial structure of their 
church, according to trip spokes- 
man Russell Shaw. 



I 



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Purchase any pair of prescription eyeglasses 
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or have your old lens duplicated 



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NO OTHER DISCOUNTS APPLY OFFER GOOD THRU OCT 



10-THE CLARION CALL, Clarion. PA, Thursday, Sept. 24, IQSf 



THE CLARION CALL, Clarion, PA, Thursday, Sept. 24, 1987-11 



HOW I MADE $184100 

niR COLLEGE 

BY WORKING WEEKENDS 









When my friends and I graduated 
from high school, we all took part-time 
jobs to pay for college. 

They ended up in car washes and 
hamburger joints, putting in long hours 
for little pay. 

Not me. My job takes just one 
weekend a month and two weeks a year. 
Yet, Ym earning $18,000 for college. 

Because I joined my local Army 
National Guard. 

They're the people who help our 
state during emergencies like hurri- 
canes and floods. They're also an 
important part of our country's military 
defense. 

So, since Fm helping them do such 
an important job, they're helping me 
make it through school. 



As soon as I finished Advanced 
Training, the Guard gave me a cash 
bonus of $2,000. Then, under the New 
GI Bill, I'm getting another $5,000 for 
tuition and books. 

Not to mention my monthly Army 
Guard paychecks. They'll add up to 
more than $11,000 over the six years 
I'm in the Guard. 

And if I take out a college loan, the 
Guard will help me pay it back— up to 
$1,500 a year, plus interest. 

It all adds up to $18,000 -or more 
—for college for just a little of my time. 
And that's a heck of a better deal than 
any car wash will give you. 

THE GUARD CAN HELP PUT 
YOU THROUGH COLLEGE, TOO. 
SEE YOUR LOCAL RECRUITER 
FOR DETAILS, CALL TOLL-FREE 
800-638-7600 * OR MAIL THIS 
COUPON. 

*In Hawaii: 737-5255; Puerto Rico: 721-4550; Guam: 477-9957; Virgin Islands 
(St. Croix): 773-6438; New Jersey: 800-452-5794. In Alaska, consult your local 
phone directory. 

c 1985 United States Government as represented by the Secretary of Defense. 
All rights reserved. 

MAIL TO: Army National Guard, P.O. Box 6000, Clifton, NJ 07015 



NAME 



,DM DF 



ADDRESS 



CITY/STATE/ZIP 



AREA CODE PHONE 



SOCIAL SECURITY NUMBER 



OCCUPATION 

STUDENT D HIGH SCHOOL D COLLEGE 
PRIOR MILITARY SERVICE DYES D NO 



US CITIZEN. DYES D NO 



BIRTH DATE 



BRANCH 



RANK 



AFM/MOS 



rM€ INf OHMATION YOU vCHUNTABtY PBOVI0€ WO-UOING YOUK SOClAl StCUWTY NUMBER 
WlLBt UStCfOBIieCIMTINGIVtPOSeSONtY YOueSOCIAl SeCUWTY MUMKR 
I WI(.LKi;SE0TOiuU(.YZEn(S<>ONSEtOTMS«) tUTHOnrv KXJSC iU3 



NatfonaiGiiani 

A1CUC21097NP J 



Army National Guard 



1 



i 



Features 




"College Is like a salad bar 



by Sharon Mleczko, 
Features Staff Writer 



College is: The answers are 
as varied as each individual, 
but one analogy from Father 
Monty Sayers carries a flavor 
for the student appetite. "Col- 
lege is like the salad bar at 
Rax. It provides the rare op- 
portunity within four years to 
experience a variety of ideas 
in one place. One day you feel 
like tacos, the next day it's 
something new," said Fr. Say- 
ers, who is a new priest at Im- 
maculate Conception Church 
on Liberty Street. 

A native of DuBois, Fr. Say- 
ers was transferred in June 
from parish ministry in East 
Brady and Rimersburg to 
Clarion. Relating his new 
appointment to the college ex- 
perience, he said, "I view my- 
self as a freshman campus 
minister." 

Fr. Sayers may be new to 
Immaculate Conception, but 
he is certainly no stranger to 
Clarion University. His col- 
lege years provided him with 
the chance to sample from the 
"salad bar" an assortment of 
activities as an elementary 
education major at Clarion 
during the early 1970s. These 
years saw him as a disc 
jockey at WCCB, circulation 



manager for the Clarion Call, 
an active member of Center 
Board and the president of Phi 
Sigma Kappa fraternity. "As 
far as I know, I'm the only 
priest from the diocese of Erie 
to graduate from Clarion." 

Another member of the Say- 
ers family is currently in his 
junior year at Clarion. An- 
drew Sayers, the younger 
brother of Fr. Sayers, is 
studying finance. 

As students today explore 
the diversity of experiences 
open to them, Fr. Sayers and 
Mow campus minister Sister 
Usa Paffrath felt it was im- 
portant to offer a taste of the 
Catholic spirit to students. An 
out^wth of this mission is 
the "Faith and Learning" ser- 
ies which is scheduled to begin 
in October. The first segment, 
designed for all students, bor- 
rows a phrase from a popular 
late-night TV skit. "Church 
Chat: The Catholic Church; 
Who Are We?" is designed to 
help students understand 
Catholicism. 

It is clear that Fr. Sayers 
considers students as an inte- 
gral and important part of the 
conmiunity. "We're interest- 
ed in what students need and 
we're here to help them. Al- 
though we may not have ans- 
wers, we can help them ex- 



plore and understand where 
they are now," said Fr. Say- 
ers. 

Aside from what many peo- 
ple may see as the importance 
of religion to students, Fr. 
Sayers comments, "There 
seems to be a real student at- 
traction to religion. Even 
tiiou^ parents aren't here to 
urge students to go to mass, 
there continues to be a large 
percentage of students 
coming to worship. And the 
community population de- 
pends on them for youth as 
they depend on the rest of the 
congregation for anchoring 
and focus." 

As for his personal involve- 
ment in the spiritual growth of 
the community, Fr. Sayers 
said, "I see it as mv chaUenge 
to bring the wisdom of the 
Gospel alive to the various 
segments of the congregation, 
from the college student to the 
retired worker." His active 
involvement in religious 
groups both on and off canipus 
exemplifies what he considers 
the most rewarding part of 
being a priest : helping people. 

Fr. Sayers holds office 
hours in the United Campus 
Ministry office on the second 
floor of Harvey Hall each 
Monday afternoon from 1:00 
to4:00. 




FR. MONTY SAYERS 

Photo by Mike Bordo, Photography Editor 




M*A*S*H 

Burns lives within Linville 



Homecoming 
switch 



by Barb Donaldson, 
Features Staff Writer 



i 



LARRY LINVILLE. . . brought many funny stories to the Clarion student body. 

Photo by Mike Bordo, Photography Editor 



As the lights were dimmed, 
applause erupted from the 
audience, a man clad in grey 
slacks and a Qarion Univer- 
sity sweatshirt walked on 
stage. 

Who was this man who 
caused such excitement in 
Marwick-Boyd Auditorium on 
September 16? He was Larry 
Linville, best known as the 
character Major Frank Bums 
ofM*A*S*H. 

About 1,400 people attended 
this Center Board sponsored 
event to see what the real 
Lairy Linville is like. 

I found Mr. Linville to be a 
warm friendly, and humorous 
person, so unlike his M*A*S*H 
character. 

Ttie first half of his perform- 
ance he told of how he became 
an actor. Mr. Linville comi- 
cally related his high school 
experiences in a drama club, 
his college experiences as an 
engineering major and how he 
evoitually ended up as an ac- 
tor. 



For the second prt of his 
performance, he focused on 
the hit show, M*A*S*H, which 
subsequently just celebrated 
its 15th anniversary. 

Mr. Linville told of 
M*A*S*H's failure as a book 
and its huge success as a 
movie and television show. He 
commented that M*A*S*H's 
success was due to "its bal- 
ance between humor, horror 
and tension." 

A question and answer ses- 
sion was given by Mr. Linville 
toward the end of the perform- 
ance. He was asked why he 
left the show and if he regret- 
ed leaving. Mr. Linville said, 
"It was time to move on" and 
that he didn't regret leaving. 
Commercials, Vegas shows, 
and movies have kept him 
busy enough. 

TTie performance ended as 
Mr. Linville showed a 
M*A*S*H episode and of 
course, signing autographs. 

The Maya Indians filed their 
front teeth to points and 
drilled holes in them so 
that they could be embel- 
lished with precious gems. 



by Tom Leitrh 
Features Staff Writer 



Halftime has traditionally 
seen the crowning of Clarion's 
Homecoming Queen. This 
year Center Board plans to 
announce the elected queen at 
a special Autumn Leaf Dance. 
This dance will be held in Har- 
vey Hall on Thursday, Oct. 1. 
The dance will start at 9 p.m. 
and the queen will be 
announced later that night. 

TTie change was instituted 
this year to allow the queen to 
reign during the entire Home- 
coming Weekend. She will 
ride in the Autumn Leaf Festi- 
val Parade already recog- 
nized as queen and 
surrounded by her court. The 
court is made up of two fresh- 
men, two sophomores, two 
juniors, two representatives 
from Venango campus and 
three seniors. At halftime the 
court will be acknowledged 
and the queen will be cere- 
moniously crowned by Kent 
O'Neil, President of Student 
Senate. 

Last year's Homecoming 
Queen was Lisa Byrne. 



12-THE CLAPION CALL, Clarion, PA Thursday, Sept. 24, 1987 



True Story 



Introducing. . . .Mr.William Uoyd 



by Kristin Men, 
Features Staff Writer 



True story, true story. 
There once was a man who 
left his students and ventured 
off to become one himself. But 
after a year had passed, he 
cided to leave the Happy Val- 
ley and come back to his be- 
loved students. 

At last, back with Clarion 
students Mr. William Lloyd, 
Communication Chairperson, 
filled me in on the latest chap- 
ter of his never-ending saga. 

For Juniors and Seniors, his 
return is a welcome occasion. 
For sophomores and fresh- 
men at last they have a 
chance to take a class from 
the man they've heard so 
many tales about. 

A man with a past, Mr. 
Uoyd brings a myriad of ance- 
dotes and experiences to 
class. Each one has a small 
lesson in which he gives just a 
bit more of himself to his stu- 
dents. 

His own education began be- 
fore his college career. Prior 
to college graduation, he work- 
ed as a steelworker, bartend- 
er, shoe salesman, encyclo- 
pedia salesman, and a 
bouncer. His job list after 
graduation varies just as 



much. His first job after grad- 
uation was as a senior high 
school English teacher. There 
he found he liked to interact 
with the students; "have some 
kind of relationship other than 
authority." 

He left teaching to work at a 
news magazine where he 
reached associated editor. 
After that he left to do public 
relations with US Steel and 
later an agency. While with 
the agency he started teach- 
ing at Robert Morris College's 
night division. He decided 
once again to switch careers 
and look for a more perman- 
ent college teaching position. 
He interviewed with the 
University of Pittsburgh, but 
it was the Clarion Conmiuni- 
cation undergraduate and 
graduate program that 
brought him here. He felt the 
program was the best he'd 
ever seen to prepare students 
for the working world. 

In June 1986 after taking a 
leave of absence from Qarion, 
he went to Penn State to finish 
10 credits he needed for his 
doctorate. In a year, he com- 
pleted 36 credits of graduate 
work while teaching speech 
courses. When the year was 
up he returned to Clarion to 




MR. WILLIAM 

Photo by Ted Fiscill, Staff Photographer 



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teach and become the Com- 
munication chair. 

Happily for us, it turns out 
that Clarion students don't 
compare too badly with those 
at Penn State, at lease in Mr. 
Lloyd's opinion. "Penn State 
students were not significant- 
ly better than our students. 
Our students are friendlier, 
more open, and a bit more ca- 
reer onented." 

This semester along with re- 
turning to the classroom, he 
also comes back to be a new 
chairperson. What does he do 




as chair? "Hide from the fac- 
ulty," he laughed. On the ser- 
ious side, he sees himself as 
the faculty representative to 
the dean, the administration, 
and the students. He also han- 
dles the multitude of paper- 
work that comes through the 
door. 

Another big project Mr. 
Lloyd along with other Com- 
munication faculty is taking 
on, is a restructuring of the 
undergraduate program. 
"We're looking at the under- 
graduated cirriculum in 
terms of how well it's meeting 
students' needs in the areas of 
skills and competencies." 

Committed to the program, 
he wants to see it stay one of 
the top in the nation. He em- 
phasized that they want to 
make the program and the 



students more effective. But 
he doesn't believe that study- 
ing is all the students should 
do. 

Mr. Lloyd believes that the 
student should be concerned 
with just meeting the require- 
ments, but with getting the 
best education possible. The 
best advice he can give to any 
college student is to have a 
social life while in college, but 
don't give up the academics. 
The juggling between classes 
and social activities will 
groom the student for real life 
responsibilities. 

The interview came to an 
end when he had to go talk to 
the newest group of freshmen. 
As I walked out the door, he 
was pulling out yet another 
story. It's great to have you 
back, Mr. Uoyd! 



Program was a success 



by Crissy Richter 
Features Staff Writer 



03 DANCE CONCERT 

•^ . WITH 




THE FUNN BAND 

TONIGHT 
9-12 P.M. 

ATTHE PARKING LOT BEMND 
MARWICK-BOYD 

Playing Soft Rock, Jazz, & Your Request 




^ 



Clarion University gave 
over 100 students ranging 
from first to sixth grade an op- 
portunity to participate in a 
summer enrichment program 
held on both the Clarion and 
Venango campuses. 

The program now in its 



fourth year gives the students 
a chance to select a variety of 
learning development courses 
which lasted two weeks. 

Also, all students who par- 
ticipated had the opportunity 
to tour the Carnegie Museum 
of Natural History located in 
downtown Pittsburgh. The 

(See Program. . . .Page 15) 



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Smith displays his "books 



THE CLARION CALL, Clarion, PA. Thursday, Sept. 24, 1987-13 



ff 



by Peggy Meister, 
Features Staff Writer 



Keith A. Smith loves books. 
But don't expect to find him 
inmiersed in a novel like TTie 
Witches of Eastwick or Mis- 
ery. He also doesn't spend 
time reading Women Who 
Love Too Much or How to Be 
Your Own Best Friend. No, 
Keith Smith spends most of 
his time with artist's books. 

As Mr. Smith explained to a 
small audience at a slide show 
he presented Sunday after- 
noon, Sept. 20, "artist's books 
are books created as art 
forms, not books that are col- 
lections of art." Each artist 
conceives a book as a theme, 
with movement and pacing, 
not just a group of photos put 
together. In addition, these 
artist's books can be any size; 
many are so large they must 
be hung on a wall or propped 
up. They can be folded like a 
fan, or like a Japanese screen, 
or like a paper airplane; they 
can have oddly shaped or cut 
pages, strings lacing pages to- 
geSier, or seeds implanted in 
tiie paper which will grow 



when watered. 

Keith Smith, whose exhibi- 
tion of prints and artist's 
books ran in the Sandf ord Gal- 
lery from August 31 through 
September 23, was first in- 
fluenced by the Beatles album 
Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts 
Club Band. Realizing that 
music and art could convey a 
single theme, with a beginning 
and an end, he began working 
on his artist's books. To date 
he has produced over 100, 
most of which are one-of-a- 
kind, which means a single 
copy was hand-produced; the 
book was not published. Mr. 
Smith has also written a text- 
book. Structure of the Visual 
Book. 

Several of Smith's works 
are in the permanent collec- 
tion of the Sandford Gallery, 
located in Marwick-Boyd Fine 
Arts Building. His work has 
been reproduced by such pub- 
lishers as Time/Life and the 
Museum of Modem Art, and 
coUections of his prints can be 
viewed in many major North 
American museums. The 
Sandford Gallery Association 



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KEITH A. SMITH'S "BOOK" was on display at the Sandford Gallery. 



is hoping to fund a workshop 
in which Smith would work 
with gifted high school stu- 

Cello recital 



dents to produce artist's 
books, which could be dis- 



played at the Qarion Spring 
Festival of the Arts. 



by Professor Vahe Berberian, 
Contributing Features Writer 



On Wednesday, Sept. 30, 
1987 at 8:15 p.m., the Qarion 
University of Pennsylvania 
Department of Music will 
present Prof. Vahe Berberian, 
cello and Prof. Annette Rous- 
sel-Pesche, piano, in the first 
faculty recital of the current 
academic year. The event will 
take place at the Marwick- 
Boyd Auditorium of the Fine 
Arts Building. 

The highly varied program 
of diverse stylistic represen- 
tation will include the Bocch- 
erini Concerto No. 2 in D 
Major, the Foss Capriccio, the 
Faure Elegie, the Dvorak Pol- 
oniase and the Brahms Sonata 
No. 2 in F Major. 

The students, the faculty 
and the general public are cor- 
dially invited to attend the 
concert with no charge for ad- 
mission. 




You can't buy love 



by Ray Tomczak and 
Cindy Karpaw, 
Features Staff Writers 



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"You can do anything you 
want, anything you put your 
heart ana soul into." 

And a thousand dollars. 

At least that's what Ronald 
Miller, a high-school nerd, 
believes when he "rents" 
Cindy Mancini to be his girl- 
friend for one month in an at- 
tempt to become popular. 
Ronald's plan forms the basis 
for "Can^t Buy Me Love" a 
new fihn from Touchstone pic- 
tures starring Patrick Demp- 
sey as Ronsdd and Amanda 
Peterson as Cindy. 

When Cindy ruins her moth- 
er's white suede outfit by spil- 
ling wine on it at a party, Ron- 
ald uses the money he had 
saved for a telescope to buy 



her a replacement. In ex- 
change, she has to agree to be 
seen with him for one month. 

Cindy is the most popular 
and beautiful girl in school, 
however, she is, m fact, lone- 
ly. Her mother, though well- 
meaning, is somewhat 
thoughtless. Her real boy- 
friend, a college football play- 
er, neglects her. Ronald, on 
the other hand, has good 
friends and a supportive 
family, but doesn't appreciate 
them. 

Back at school, Ronald's 
plan seems to work at first. He 
is gradually accepted by the 
people who are considered 
"cool." and his personality be- 
gins to change accordingly. As 
his younger brother com- 
ments, "The kid's not weird 



anymore. 

(See Love. . 



.Page 14) 



L 



DDYOUl/VANTTOTEARN 
HOW TO DANCE? 

DANCER'S STUDIO 

501 Main Street 
Above Bob's Sub 

ANNOUNCES ADULT BEGINNER 
TAP, BALLET AND JAZZ CLASSES 

ir Classes begin in Oct. 
For enrollment call 226-4132 





14— THE CLARJON CALL, Clarion, PA, Thursday, Sept. 24, 1987' 



THE CLARION CALL, Clarion, PA, Thursday, Sept. 24, 1987—15 



Love. . . 



But going out with Cindy 
doesn't make Ronald as popu- 
lar as breaking up with her 
does. After this, he really be- 
comes part of the cool crowd, 
and dates a multitude of girls. 

Ronald begins to ignore his 
old friends, especially his b^t 
friend Kenneth. Things reach 
the breaking point when 
Ronald participates in a 
Halloween raid on Kenneth's 
house with some of his new 
friends. This signals the be- 
ginning of the end for Ronald. 

Sure enough, Ronald's illu- 
sions are shattered at the New 
Year's Eve party. After 
Cindy's boyfriend Bobby pays 
a surprise visit, a drunken 
Cindy reveals the whole 
scheme to the stunned crowd. 

After this, Ronald is worse 
than a nerd. The cools, the 
nerds, and even the 
"mutants" will have nothing 
to do with him now. Even Cin- 
dy won't talk to him. 

We're getting close to the 
end, which is a good reviewer 
will not reveal. We will say 
that the story ends happily, af- 
ter the expected confrontation 
between Ronald and one of the 
leaders of the cool clique, dur- 
ing which Ronald reveals that 
he has learned his lesson. 

MS. KARPAW: "Expected 
confrontation" is right. The 
whole movie was so predict- 
able that it was boring. 



[(Continued from Page 13) 

MR. TOMCZAK: I found the 
movie predictable, also, but 
that didn't spoil my enjoy- 
ment of it. I thought that the 
characters were well handled 
and the comedy was quite 
good. That's what savedf the 
movie for me. 

MS. KARPAW: I agree with 
your observations about the 
comedy and the characters, I 
feel that the movie took those 
good points and trivialized 
them. The end, in particular, 
was a letdown to me. The film- 
makers compromised the in- 
tegrity of the film's message 
by going for the happy ending. 
MR. TOMCZAK: The end- 
ing was a disappointment to 
me also. If the film had ended 
about 60 seconds earlier, leav- 
ing the ending more indeter- 
minant, I would have been 
more satisfied with it. 

MS. KARPAW: I agree with 
you one hundred percent. A 
more uncertain ending would 
have made the film more 
meaningful and emotionally 
gripping. 

MR. TOMCZAK: "Can't 
Buy Me Love" is produced by 
Thom Mount, written by 
Michael Swerdlick, and di- 
rected by Steve Rash, and no- 
where in the credits does the 
name John Hughes appear. 
However, this film looks much 
like one of Hughes' high school 
epics. 




The most exating 

fewhours 

you^D spend aU week 

Run. Climb. Rappel. Navigate. Lead. 
And develop the confidence and 
skills vou won't get from a textbook. 
Enroll in Army ROTC 
as one of your electives. Get the facts 
today. BE ALL VOU CAN BE. 



ARMY RESERVE OFFICERS' TRAINING CORPS 
Call 226-2292/ 226-2293 




Roving Reporter Asks: 



SISKEL & EBERT. 

ter. 



.Cindy Karpaw and Ray Tomczak will nnake suggestions on the movies you should see this semes- 

Photo by Mike Bordo, Photography Editor 



MS. KARPAW: For who 
may not know who John 
Hughes is, he wrote and di- 
rected several popular teen- 
oriented movies such as: 
"The Breakfast Qub," "Six- 
teen Candles," and "Pretty In 
Pink." AU of these had the fa- 
miliar confrontation of high 
school jocks versus nerds, 
with a resultant happy ending 
for all involved. 

MR. TOMCZAK: This film 
borrows heavily from Hughes' 
bag of tricks, from the high 
school setting, the cools-nerds 
conflict, even down to borrow- 
ing the title from an old song 
as in "Sixteen Candles." 

MS. KARPAW: However, in 
Humes' best work, such as 
"Sixteen Candles," he never 
fell into the trap of tele- 
graphing his plot develop- 
ments. It really became 
annoying, especially the scene 



at the Columbus Day dance, 
where you just knew everyone 
was going to imitate Ronald's 
dance, which he learned from 
a PBS show on African rituals, 
rather than "American Band- 
stand." 

MR. TOMCZAK: The only 
real surprise of the movie, for 
me, was Bobby's return at the 
New Year's Eve party, but 
from there things went along 
in a different, though still fore- 
seeable, groove. 

MS. KARPAW: I, too, was 
surprised by Bobby's return, 
but it was only a plot device to 
get Cindy to spill the whole 
story. I think the writer should 
have developed that subplot a 
little more. 

MR. TOMCZAK: Despite its 
shortcomings, "Can't Buy 
Me Love" is an enjoyable 
film. Tlie characters draw you 
into their high school world. 



* Autumn Leaf Flowers 

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flowers C' gifts 

P 226-7070 90 Merle St., Clarion I 





and the humor is natural and 
subtle, with just a touch of the 
raunchy humor you might 
expect in a comedy of this 
type. If handled with a bit 
more originality, this could 
have been a great film. As it 
is, it is still a very good one, 
and I would recommend that 
you go see it. 

m. KARPAW: If you're in 
the mood for a cute, predict- 
able high school comedy, then 
I, too, would say to go see this 
movie. But if you're looking 
for something with a theme 
and a little meaning, then this 
film probably isn't for you. 

$300SCHOURSHiPS 

Ten $300 Scholarships will be 
awarded this year to students by the 
Clarion Alumni Association. Students 
must have completed one year at 
Qarion and are currently a full time 
student to be^ligible for the scholar- 
ship. Application forms may be 
picked up at the Alumni House and 
returned to the Alumni House by 
Sept. 30. 

POSITIONS AVAILABLE 

Committee positions now avail- 
able for Conduct and Presidential 
Advisory Board. Applications avail- 
able in Student Senate Office, 232 
Egbert Hall. Deadline: 10/1/87. 



Abundant Life Christian 
Fellowship Sundays 8 p.m. 

CAMBELL HALL RM 40 - basement 

STATEMENT OF FAITH tnl'fo^e^lTi!^^^^^^^^^^ 

1. Born Again Experience, Salvation by Faith — John 3:3-7, II Cor. 5:17 

2. Infallibility and authority of the scripture ~ II Peter 1:20-21, Hebrews 4:12 

3. Trinity — Father, Son, Holy Spirit — Mathew 28:19, Mathew 3:16-17 

4. Divinity and Lordship of Jesus Christ — John 1:1-2, Colossians 2:9-10 

5. WaterBaptismbyimmersion — Matthew 28:19, Matthew 3:1 1-17 

6. Baptism of the Holy Spirit — Matthew 3:11, Acts 1:4-8, Acts 2:38-39 

7. Gifts of the Holy Spirit — 1 Corinthians 12:1-11, Corinthians 13:1-13 

8. Return of our Lord Jesus Christ — Titus 2:13, 1, 1 Thessalonlans 4:16-17 



How do you like the new mascot? 





Lisa Jackson 
Freshman, Special Ed. 
"Great, cool, liked when it hatched 
from the egg." 



Dennis "Potts" Pottinger 
Senior, Computer Science 

"I didn't see it, but I saw a picture 
of it in the Call. It looked cool." 



Terry Woods 
Sophomore, Undecided 

"Who is she?" 





Scott Maxwell 
Junior, History 
"Haven't seen it yet." 

Questions by Peter B. McMillen, Features Staff Writer 



Andrew Ho-Tung 
Graduate Student, Business 

"Different from last year." 

Photos by Mil<e Bordo, Photography Editor 



Grant brings new tutorial services 



by Kellie Acquaro 
Features Staff Writer 



The Clarion County Lit- 
eracy Council has sponsored a 
free literacy program here in 
Clarion County since the fall of 
1964. 

Students and teachers are 
dispersed throughout Clarion 
County, including Knox, Ship- 
penville and New Bethlehem. 
This is the only program 
available for Clarion County 
residents to teach literacy to 
adults. Tutors teach up to ele- 
mentary level, mostly read- 



ing, writing and spelling. Ac- 
cording to Susan Hays, the 
Literacy Program Du*ector, 
"What we are working for is 
for our students to pass the 
GED (General Equivalency 
Diploma)." 

All tutoring lessons are pri- 
vate and on a one-on-one oa- 
sis. Confidential services and 
convenient times for both 
tutor and student are avail- 
able. Hays acknowledged 
that, "The lessons are on the 
average of one night a week 
for about two hours." These 
lessons are self-paced for each 



individual student. 

Ttie Literacy Council has 
just recently received a grant 
from The Department of Edu- 
cation in Harrisburg. Ac- 
cording to Hays, this $16,925 
grant is being used for many 
"new changes and additions. 
Tutor training, books, ma- 
terials, guest speakers for the 
tutors, and especially ma- 
terials for promotion, such as 
public service announce- 
ments, posters and brochures 
are a few of their necessities. 
Just recently Hays and the 

(See Grant Page 18) 



Program... 

students were able to see first 
hand such fascinating exhibits 
as fossils and a display en- 
titled Life on Ice. Endangered 
and extinct animal species 
were also seen by the "CUP 
students." This learning ex- 
perience was provided by 
CUP'S Continuing Education 
Department and the Enrich- 
ment Program, at a cost of 
$10. 

Why have this program? 
According to Carol Hillman, 
who works with gifted stu- 
dents in the Clarion-Lime- 
stone School District, all chil- 
dren should receive the same 
chance at education and its 
benefits. This concept led to 
the development of the Sum- 
mer Enrichment Program 
that works in cooperation with 
our own Continuing Education 
Department. In addition Ms. 
Hillman states that, "We have 



(Continued from Page 12) 

a limit on the size of classes in 
order to maximize learning. 
Our aim is to acconunodate 
the student as much as pos- 
sible." 

TTie teachers are hand pick- 
ed by recommendations by 
school superintendents, fellow 
teachers, parents and stu^ 
dents. Teachers selected were 
the following: Jo Donaldson 
from Franklin, Susan 
Kuberry of Titusville, Linda 
Twiest of Clarion-Limestone 
School, Kelly Terwilliger from 
Parker, Roseann Rookey of 
Oil City, Linda Mertz of the 
Seneca area, Claire Miller 
from Cooperstown, and Mary 
Kay Hartle of Clarion. 

These teachers feel the 
Summer Enrichment Pro- 
gram can broaden the hori- 
zons of many children in the 
lUGArea. 





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LGood only at: W, 
j Clarion, Pi 



16-THE CLARJON CALL, Clarion, PA, Thursday. Sept. 24, 1987 

Senior Profile 



Campus Close-up.., Danamuro 



Local bars are looking at I.D.'s 



THE CLARION CALL, Clarion, PA, Thursday Sept. 24, 1987-17 



by Kimberly Harkless 
Features Staff Writer 



Stand back Michael J. Fox 
and allow Clarion University's 
Dana Mauro to show what 
success is really all about. At 
age 22, Dana has set her goals 
and is ready to go for it. 

Dana, a 1983 graduate of 
Bethel Park Senior High 
School, has always been one 
who gets involved. While par- 
ticipating in a number of 
activities during her high 
school years, Dana especiaUy 
enjoyed one in particular - 
dancing. Having had access to 
her own dance studio while 
growing up, she developed 
both the talent and desire to 
dance. 

Dana proved her excep- 
tional dancing abilities by win- 
ning her high school dance 
competition and becoming 
Miss Dance. However, that 
was just the beginning for 
Dana. She then went on to 
compete in the Miss Dance 
Nationals held in Los Angeles 
where she placed second. In 
1965, Dana was chosen as our 
own Miss CUP which ultimate- 
ly led to her participation in 
the Miss Pennsylvania Pag- 
eant in the summer of 1986. 
Family and friends have 



urged Dana to continue on. 
The smile on her face reveal- 
ed that she is seriously consid- 
ering doing just that. 

Dana's favorite pasttime is 
still dancing. In fact, this past 
summer she enjoyed the op- 
portunity of dancing profes- 
sionally in a chorus line in Hil- 
tonhead, S.C. Undoubtedly, 
she was a success. 

Prior to coming to Qarion 
University, Dana was a dance 
major. However, after her 
first semester, she admits, "I 
realized something was miss- 
ing - scholastics." Scholastics 
is something that Dana con- 
siders to be very important 
and her outstanding grade 
point average reflects her 
commendable attitude. 

Dana is currently a senior 
marketing major here at Clar- 
ion. She is also enjoying her 
first year acting as a Resident 
Assistant of an honors wing in 
Nair Hall. She is a member of 
the Zeta Tau Alpha sorority 
and is also President of the 
American Marketing Associa- 
tion. It shouldn't come as a 
surprise to learn that Dana 
hopes to soon be involved also 
in the starting of a dance club 
at Clarion. 




DANA MAURO 



Photo by Chuck Lizza, Staff Photographer 



Dana's future career plans 
involve three aspects: danc- 
ing, marketing, and interior 
design. "I have to figure out a 
way to combine all three," she 




THE BUDGETING 
GOURMET 



by Angela Covelli, 
Features Staff Writer 




Originating from the campfires of Boy Scouts, Girl Scouts and people 
who love the outdoors. Smores and camping were made for each other. 
But even if you were never the "outdoorsy type" or stiU aren't. . .you can 
stay inside and make these chocolate wonders. 

These would probably be great when you have to hit the books late at 
night. For those of you who love living in the chocolate comer you are 
saved. Of course you also have to have developed a taste for marshmal- 
lows. But what person did not stuff marshmallows into their mouth when 
they were a kid. Come on now admit it, you did ! 

Also, don't even tell me mommy did not hand you a graham cracker 
to keep you quiet when you were a "screaming munchkin." Even today 
older people admit to liking graham crackers. 

Put all of these favorite ingredients together and they equal one item : 
SMORES. 

So now you know what you've been missing. Don't let yourself be in 
the dark for much longer. Make smores today and the tomorrows that you 
make them will be endless. 

First you have to run out and purchase a few needed items. These 
items being a hershey bar, marshmallows and graham crackers. 

To make one smore you will need exactly : 

2 Graham Crackers (4 sections attached) 20 

8 miniature marshmallows _06 

•^ of a Hershey bar 15 

Total 41 

For starters take one graham cracker and put Hershey's chocolate 
on top of it. For the finale you top this sweet sensation with the miniature 
marshmallows. Sandwich it with the other graham crackers. Put in the 
oven until melted then pop it in your mouth. A nice substitute for the oven 
would be over a camp fire. 

Enjoy it! 



says, "I don't want to give up 
any of them." 

Following graduation in the 
spring, Dana would like to 
dance professionally for a 
year or two before putting her 
marketing skills to use. Tlien, 
in about five years, she wishes 
to return to school in order to 
obtain a master's degree in 
the field of interior design. She 
expalins, "I haven't gotten 
tired of being educated yet. " 



In the past, Dana has put 
forth a great deal of effort to 
achieve her accomplishments 
and it is highly unlikely that 
she will ever chance. She is a 
person of great ambition and 
integrity who is determined to 
make the most of her lifetime. 
If there is anyone who is going 
to succeed in life, it's Dana 
Mauro, and Qarion Univer- 
sity is glad to have her a part 
of it. 



In the Groove 



W3 




NEW ALBUM RELEASES 



Wayne Brosius, 




Compiled by Kevin Beam and 
Features Staff Writers 

ARTIST 

Van Morrison 

Temptations 

Kiss 

Lynyrd SItynyrd 

Whodini 

Yes 

Inxs 

Bruce Springsteen 

TheJudds 

Aiabama 

Samantha Fox 

NOTES. . . . 

•The OLLIE NORTH saga has yet to die down. Recording artist MITCH RYD- 
ER Is about to release a song entitled "Good Gollie, Ask Oilie," The song 
is re-worded version of Ryder's 1966 hit "Good Goiiy, Miss Molly." The 
song carries a disclaimer apologizing to the Marine Corps. 

•PINK FLOYD is out and about for the first time In five years, but the 21- 
year-old British band will be minus one key element. Bass player ROGER 
WATERS left the band In 1983 and is now on his own. WATERS wrote 
some of the band's biggest songs Including "MONEY" and "ANOTHER 
BRICK IN THE WALL (PART II)." 

•Who said farmers are square? FARM AID III drew quite a hip bunch. 
JOHN COUGAR MELLENCAMP, NEIL YOUNG, BRUCE HORNSBY, JOE 
WALSH, LOU REED, and the FABULOUS THUNDERBIRDS were just some 
of the acts at the University of Nebraska's Memorial Stadium for the Sept. 
19 event. 



TITLE 

Poetic Champions Compose 

Together Again 

Crazy Nights 

Legend 

Open Sesame 

Big Generator 

Kick 

Tunnei of Love 

Christmas Time 

Just Us 

Nothing's Gonna Stop Me Now 



by Jenny Palazzo, 
Features Staff Writer 



With each new semester at 
Clarion University comes a 
new schedule. Some, however, 
are more easily learned than 
others. Many students on our 
campus, 21 or not, have little 
difficulty in remembering that 
Tuesday nights are Mug Night 
at the University Inn, or that 
Thursday nights are 3-for-l 
Nights at the Red Stallion 
(known as the U.I. and the 
Roost, respectively). 

Often, students remember 
the local bar schedule but 
forget one important detail — 
in order to get into the bars, 
you must be at least 21. Many 
underage students intent on 
barhopping feel they have no 
need to worry whether they 
are of legal age or not, be 
cause they have access to a 
fake I.D. Those relying on 
fake I.D's are in for a tough 
semester at our local nights 
spots. 

At the University Inn, Man- 
ager Randy Smith explained 
their nightly procedure for 
carding. Everyone entering 
the U.I. is required to show 
identification, every night of 
the week, and only a valid 



driver's license is excepted 
(no draft cards, etc.). Anyone 
suspected of using a fake I.D. 
wilf have their I.D. confiscat- 
ed immediately, where they 
are turned over to the local 
police the next day. Those 
whose ID'S were mistakenly 
thought to be fake and turned 
in to police may then go up to 
the police station and claim 
their ID, provided they have 
valid additional identification 
with them. 

This semester, the U.I. has 
confiscated ID's, and has the 
right to detain anyone they be- 
lieve may be trying to pass a 
fake ID, and will call the 
police in to make arrests if 
necessary. 

Regular patrons of the U.I. 
are particularly helpful in 
spotting suspicious-looking 
students, and will report to the 
management anyone they be- 
lieve may be in the bar with a 
fake ID. The management can 
then have the ID checked im- 
mediately with local police, 
least of all causing embar- 
rassment for the person in- 
volved. 

Down the street at the Cap- 
tain Loomis, carding is also a 
regular procedure. Whether 
Manager Dana Troese or one 



of his employees checks the 
ID, those caught trying to pass 
a fake will likely have their ID 
confiscated. 

Troese believes the big 
problem with Qarion students 
tryingto get into bars with 
faike IDs, is that the students 
getinto a bar as a game or a 
challenge. Sooner or later, 
they are bound to get caught. 

Over at the Roost, carding 
is standard. If you aren't card- 
ed at the door, you will defin- 
itely be carded at the bar. If 
you are in the Roost with a 
fake ID, and it is obvious that 
the ID has been altered or 
tampered with. Manager 
Randy McGuire will confis- 
cate the ID, and turn it in to 
the local police. Mr. McGuire 
cites Thursday nights as the 
busiest, with 17 IDs confis- 
cated in one night last semes- 
ter, with Wednesday nights 
running a close second. 

So those of you under-21'ers 
out there who have a fake ID 
clutched in your hot little 
hand, ready to hit the bars to- 
night. . .better think twice 
about it before you have to de- 

faid yourself later " . . .but 

itreaUy ISME!!" ....sure it 
is. 



ACROSS 34 Chaldean city 

1 Moccasin 35 Vast ages TU-n ^-s 
4 Entire 37 Heavenly body ] f-^ 
9 Unit of Siamese 38 Vase ' ^-^ 

currency 39 Breaks \ a / — . , . , 

12 Guide's high suddenly WOO \ V 
note 41 Printer's \iyiK^\^f\ y 

13 Downy duck measure /'^^ ,r^r^^^ iir/^ 

14 Ocean 42 The sweetsop ( f SMA/ \( 

15 Soft 43 Choi* voice V^ILJOOVVL_JI^ 
17 Capital of 45 Small amount r\ ——. ^^ 

Bahama 46 Supposed -^1 // O 
Islands 48 Newest K^^i- \^ 

19 Lubricate 51 Union groups: 

20 Experience abbr. 

2 1 Fruit of the pine 52 Chemical 

23 Exclamation compound 

24 Weird 54 River; Sp. 

27 Those holding 55 Decimal base - ^ .1. . , 
office 56 Forays 2 Beverage 6 Hypothetical 

28 Employed 57 Pigpen 3 Ecclesiastical , ° _ . „ . „ . 

30 Sicilian volcano „" decrees «w„ «f 

31 Agave plant ^OWN 4 Source of water S nl^f ° 

32 Clothing 1 Wooden pin 5 Hasten 10 Beverage 




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1 1 ureeK lener 
16 Stalemate 
18 Metal 

20 Playhouse 

21 Quotes 

22 Vegetable 

23 Snakes 

25 Habituate 

26 Merits 

28 Above 

29 Apothecary's 
weight 

32 Tremulous 

33 Teutonic deity 
36 Indian tribe 
38 Declares 

40 Scoff 

42 River island 

44 Greek mountain 
peak 

45 Prohibits 

46 Follows Sept. 

47 Baker's product 

48 Conducted 

49 Pose for portrait 

50 Plaything 

53 Note of scale 


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cou£G{ PRESS sERvia (SOLUTION ON PAGE 18) 



Dr. Stalker interested in world education 



by Vicki Schreiber, 
Features Staff Writer 



Dr. Sylvia Stalker, Assist- 
ant Professor of Education 
here at Clarion University, 
has co-authored a chapter in 
the book titled "Latin Amer- 
ica: Perspectives On A Re- 
gion," published in 1987. 

I^. Stalker worked on the 
chapter, "Latin American 
Education," for about one 
year, along with Robert Ar- 



nove and Michael Chiappetta 
both professors of Compara- 
tive Education at Indiana Uni- 
versity, Bloomington, Ind. 
Comparative Education in- 
volves looking at education in 
different areas of the world to 
better understand both other 
areas and our own system. 
Comparative Education was 
Dr. Stalker's minor in college. 
As Dr. Stalker explained, 
there is quite a difference in 



the educational system in 
Latin America than here in 
the United States. In Latin 
America there remains an ex- 
tensive split in the classes, 
which in turn, affects edu- 
cation. The wealthy have eas- 
ier access to schools and edu- 
cational materials, while the 
poor receive two or three 
years of education and no 
more. 
Ttie differences in the urban 




DR. SYLVIA STALKER welcomes different types of education around the world. 



and rural populations are also 
quite eminent. In the urban 
areas there are one room 
countryside schools with 
different grades and subjects 
progressing at one time. Like- 
wise, there is a bi-lingual edu- 
cational communication prob- 
lem. "It is especially interest- 
ing that it reflects a very rigid 
class system," says Stalker. 

There remains a strong his- 
tory of Colonialism and Tradi- 
tionalism throughout Latin 
America which strongly ef- 
fects education, politics, eco- 
nomics, and the cultural 
system. This is exemplified in 
their representation of educa- 
tion to serve the Colonial 
power, often based in Europe. 

Dr. Stalker has a compre- 
hensive background concern- 
ing educational systems in 
other countries. She was a 
Girl Scout in high school and 
college, and worked one sum- 
mer at the International Girl 
Scout Chalet in Switzerland. 
She spent one semester of 
graduate school, along with 
education student undergrad- 
uate groups in Hang Zhou, 
China. After college, she 
joined the Peace Corps and 
worked at the Marshall Is- 
lands and Micronisia, each 
located in the Pacific Ocean. 
TTiis is where Dr. Stalker be- 
gan to consider the effects of 
Colonialism on people. 

Stalker lived 10 years in 
Texas where she was made 
aware of the troubles in Cen- 
tral America. Along with trav- 



eling to all of these places, Dr. 
Stalker has also traveled to 
Nicaragua three times, South 
America, Columbia and Mex- 
ico many times. Some day she 
hopes to visit Africa and 
return to Latin America in the 
near future. 

Dr. Stalker voiced apprecia- 
tion in the International 
Student Office here on campus 
and the opportunities offered 
through them for international 
study. 

To those in education Dr. 
Stalker has this to say: "The 
world seems to get smaller. I 
think it's essential that those 
in education consider our role 
seriously, to promote inter- 
national understanding and 
world peace." 



— Hey You. ( 

Interested in 

buying a 
5x7 glossy 
of ANY photo 
run in the 
Clarion CaU? 



Stop by or 
call us at 

2380 

$2.00 a 
print. 




18— THE CLAfllON CALL, Clarion, PA, Thursday, Sept. 24, 1987 



THE CLARION CALL, Clarion, PA, Thursday, Sept. 24, 1987-19 



Chandler Menu 

THURSDAY. SEPT. 24 
LUNCH; Split Pea Soup with Ham Chunks, Scotch Barley Soup, Bacon, Lettuce & Tomato on 
Toast, Sloppy Joe on Bun. Potato Chips, Green Bean SuccoUsh „u„uji»n 

DINNER; Split Pea Soup with Ham CTiunks, Scotch Barley Soup, Salisbury Steak, Baked Bar-B- 
Q Pork Chops Chopped Broccoli, Mashed Potatoes with Gravy, Sauteed Cabbage with Bacon. 

FRIDAY, SEPT. 25 
BREAKFAST: Stewed Prunes, Fried Eggs (Sunnyside or Over), Cinnamon Rolls, Oatmeal, 
Home Fried Potatoes, Banana, Creamed Chipped Beef on Muffin. .~. . 

LUNCH: Cream of Tomato Soup, Clam Bisque, Grilled Cheese Sandwich, Creamed Chicken over 
Biscuit. Potato Chips, French Fried Cauliflower. „. uojw d 

DINNER: Cream of Tomato Soup, Clam Bisque, Fried Ham Sandwiches, Fish Sandwich on Bun, 
Tacos Baked Potatoes. Hot Cheese Sauce, Tacos, Cheese & Broccoli Sauce. 

SATURDAY, SEPT. 2«: 
BREAKFAST: Scrambled Eggs, Oatmeal, Bacon, Hash Brown PoUtoes, Pancakes with Syrup, 

Raspberry Coffee Ring. „ , .. r« j.u 

LUNCH: Homemade Navy Bean Soup, Beef Vegetable Soup, Cheese Omelette, Pizza with 
Pepperoni, Fried Potatoes, Green Beans. . „ .. j 

DINNER: Homemade Navy Bean Soup, Beef Vegetable Soup, Roast Pork, Beefarom, Buttered 
Carrots, Creamed Spinach, Macaroni, Whipped Potatoes with Gravy. 

SUNDAY. SEPT. 27 
BRUNCH: Pink Grapefruit, Scrambled Eggs, Bacon, Warm Sticky Buns, Desert Peaches, 
Chicken Chow Mein over Steamed Rice with Chow Mein Noodles, Hash Brown Potatoes, Banana, 
Blueberry Hot Cakes with Syrup, Sausage Patty, Oatmeal. .„.,.„ „ .. ^ 

DINNER: French Onion Soup, Navy Bean Soup, Smoked Ham, Braised Sirloin Tips, Buttered 
Frozen Peas, Buttered Noodles, Yellow Squash. 

MONDAY, SEPT. 28 
BREAKFAST: Scrambled Eggs, Bacon, Cinnamon Rolls, Hash Brown PoUtoes, Raisin Muffins, 
French Toast with Syrup, Grilled Ham, Cream of Wheat. .^ .„ „ j 

LUNCH: Homemade Beef with Macaroni Soup, Cream of Celery Soup, Hoagie. Fned Egg Sand- 
wich, Com Chips, Boston Baked Beans. 

DINNER : Homemade Beef with Macaroni Soup, Cream of Celery Soup, Roast of Beef with Gravy, 
Turkey Croquette with Cream of Mushroom Sauce, Oven Browned Potatoes, Brussel Sprouts, 
Mixed Vegetables. 

TUESDAY, SEPT. 2» 
BREAKFAST: Banana, Cheese and Ham Omelette, Hot Oatmeal, Hard Boiled Eggs, Home Fried 
Potatoes. Cinnamon Rolls, Chilled Purple Plums, Blueberry Hot Cakes with Syrup, JeUy Roll. 
LUNCH : Homemade Cream of Chicken Soup, Split Pea Soup, Swedish Meat Balls, Fish and Chips, 
CotUge Fries, Stewed Tomatoes, Buttered Rice, Butter Asparagus Pieces. 

WEDNESDAY. SEPT. 30 
BREAKFAST: Fried Eggs, Bacon, Cinnamon Rolls, Hash Brown Potatoes, Hot Waffles with 
Syrup, Cream of Wheat, English Muffins. „ j_ . ^ ^. .. 
LUNCH : Cream of Tomato Soup, Chicken Broth, Grilled Ham and Cheese Sandwich, Chicken ala 
King in Pattv Shell, Cheese Curls, Baked Apples. „ . .. ^ 
DINNER: Cream of Tomato Soup, Chicken Broth, Grilled Pork Chops, Cheese Ravioh, Green 
Beans Amondine, Tater Gems, Harvard Beets. 




LARRY LINVILLE. . . .shown here as Frank Burns of M*A*S*H, showed CUP an episode of the hit television show. 

Photo by Mike Bordo, Photography Editor 



Tutor Coordinator, Barbara 
Snedegar, went to a National 
Convention held at Blooms- 
burg University in Blooms- 
burg, Pa. Literacy Program 
coordinators participated 
from all over the country and 
even foreign countries showed 
their support at the conven- 
tion. 

CUP has also contributed 
to the Literacy Program's 
efforts. Hays told me of Clar- 



^1 id n I ■ ■ ■ ■(Continued from Page 15) 

ion students who have made mentioned, "Most of our 
public service announce- 
ments which are running on 
the radio to help promote the 
literacy program. TV-5 has 
also done promotion for the 
Council. Hays stated that, 
"The grant from Harrisburg 
may also have space for an in- 
ternship." This is still in the 
tentative stage. 

A degree in education is not 
required for a tutor. Snedegar 



Puzzle Solution 



tutors are enthusiastic and 
read well or they wouldn't 
have interest." An idea that 
has been working well in its 
beginning stages is that of 
double tutors, a two tutors to 
one student situation. Hays 
thinks this is a good idea for 
college students who are inter- 
ested in tutoring who have 
limited time to help out. 
Volunteer tutors are always 



needed to teach the functional- 
ly illiterate. It is a challenge 
and each tutor is helping peo- 
ple to be successful and cope 
with everyday life. For more 
information anyone may call 
the office at the Clarion Free 
Library, 226-7172, Susan Hays, 
764-5645 or Barbara Snedegar, 
22^6035. Watch for the Liter- 
acy Council's table during 
ALF, located in front of The 
House of the Dragon. 



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We never make 



your hamburger unril 



we fake ysyr order. 



L 



Single HAMBURGER 

Regular FRENCH FRY 

and IVIedium COKE: 



M.99 



Good at participating Wendy's 
Not valid with any other offer or 
KIDS' FUN PAK ' M 
Please present coupon when ordering 
One coupon per customer. 
Cheese extra and tax extra 
where applicable. 
Offer expires 10/1/87 



•"" BIG CLASSIC "] 
Regular FRENCH FRY ■ 




and Medium COKE: 

M.99 



I 



Good at participating Wendy's. 
Not valid with any other offer or 
KIDS' FUN PAK. ' M 
Please present coupon when ordering. 
One coupon per customer. 
Cheese extra and tax extra 
where applicable. 
Offer expires 10/1/87 




Any Baked Potatoe 

$1.29 



Good at participating Wendy's. 
Not valid with any other offer or 
KIDS' FUN PAK. ' '^ 
Please present coupon when ordering. 
One coupon per customer. 
Cheese extra and tax extra 
where applicable. 
Offer expires 9/26/87 




38 8th Ave. 
226-5941 

HOURS: 
SUNDAY-THURSDAY 

10:30-MIDNIQHT 

FRIDAY & SATURDAY 

10:30-1:00 A.M. 




gpom^s.. 




...Olf 



R^ir 



What's up 
Chuck 

by David Mahaffey 

Sports Editor 

Being somewhat knowledge- 
able of sports, I have the greatest 
respect in the world for Pitts- 
burgh Steeler coach Chuck Noll, 
but I can not understand his ded- 
ication to quarterback Mark Ma- 
lone. 

Mark Malone has proved in the 
previous season that his ability, 
or should I say inability, to move 
the offense is limited to handing 
the ball off to Walter Abercrom- 
bie and Ernest Jackson. He has 
yet to prove to anyone that he 
could he an even average NFL 
quarterback. 

In the past Coach Noll has been 
quick to get rid of players who 
have not performed up to their 
potential or who continuously 
make mistakes. 

The most recent case in point is 
Darryl Sims, the former number 
one draft choice who was given 
only three years to become a 
force on the defensive line. 

Other players in the past that 
Noll cast away for making mis- 
takes include fullback Sidney 
Thornton, defensive back Ron 
Johnson, running back Greg 
Hawthorne, and tight end Bennie 
Cunningham. 

So what is it that keeps Noll 
from replacing Mark Malone? 
True there is no QB waiting in the 
wings to take over the job, but 
there was one that the Steelers 
did let go. 

Last Sunday, Scott Campbell 
led the Atlanta Falcons to a 21-20 
win over the Washington Red- 
skins. Campbell is a player who 
fell out of Noll's good grace and 
was sent packing. 

Malone has continued to make 
mistake after mistake in his 
starting role and still, the Steeler 
Boss has decided to keep him on 
the field in the most important 
role that a player can have. 

If the Steelers are going to 
make a move in the 1987 season it 
will have to be with Bubby Bris- 
ter, the second year man from 
Northwest Louisiana. Brister 
hasn't looked like an ALL-PRO in 
his limited playing time, but his 
mistakes are from inexperience 
and not from a QB that has been 
inadequate for almost three sea- 
sons. 

In other NFL news, I think the 
strike will only hurt the League. 
Fans and lower paid players are 
going to suffer the most. 

If the NFL player's association 
didn't learn anything from 1982 
then they will learn the hard way 
this time around. 

(See On the Run. . .Page 21) 



Lady netters shine at home 



by Susan Kurtz 
Sports Staff Writer 



The Clarion Unversity wo- 
men's volleyball team had a 
very successful weekend. 
The Lady Netters won the 
annual Clarion Classic Tour- 
nament. 

Not only did the Lady Ea- 
gles win, but they were the 
only team to go through the 
tournament without a loss. 

Coach Cindy Opalski feels 
that this success is contribut- 
ed to the girls maturing as a 
team. "When players are 
consistant in their play, it 
shows the progress and ma- 
turity of the team," said the 
Qarion mentor. 

"This tournament was the 
best playing performance 
thus far this year for the 
team," Opalski said. "Not 
only was the team play instru- 
mental in our success, but also 
individual player's strength. ' ' 

"Hie first match was {dayed 
against St. Francis, a Division 
I playing team. The match 
was won by Clarion 15-3, 15-6, 
IM. 

Opalski states that the team 
had trouble earlier in the week 
playing against mediocre 
teams. 

"TTie past week of practice 
we worked on communication 
problems on the court. The 
improvements were very evi- 
dent against St. Francis," 
Opalski said. 

Barb Buck and Jodi Pezek 
both had an excellent match, 
according to Opalski. 

Buck led Clarion with 10 
kills, while Pezek followed 
close behind with eight kills. 
Missy O'Rourke led the way 
with six service aces. 

Opalski thought the defen- 
sive plays were a major con- 
tribution to the win. The play- 
ers on the court worked well 
together and projected very 
organized plays. 

The Clarion coach feels the 
defensive game is the single 
most important factor in 
every match played. "The of- 
fensive game may bring at- 



tention to a team and look im- 
pressive, but it is the defen- 
sive plays that win games," 
said Opalski. 

Diane Guenther, Kelli Blo- 
sel, and O'Rourke all played 
fantastic defensive games, 
according to Opalski. 

"All three played with ag- 
gressive force and with intelli- 
gence," said Opalski. "If we 
continue to play aggressive 
defense with few mental 
errors, we, as team, can go up 
against any other team no 
matter how strong of an of- 
fense they have." 

The next match of the tour- 
nament was against Mercy- 
hurst, a Division II team out of 
Erie. Opalski presumed they 
would be their toughest com- 
petition. They play a very 
good defensive game, but fell 
to Qarion 15-10, 15-9, 15-11. 

"We started out very slow in 
these games. We chose to 
start Barb Buck in the back 
row because of her excellent 
defensive skills," Opalski 
said, "When Barb moved to 
the front row, we had a well 
balanced, strong three hitter 
offense." 

Tammy Wolfe led this 
match with 12 kills and Buck 
foUowed with 10 kills. Opalski 
feels that Wolfe is one of her 
most improved players since 
pre-season training. 

Opalski said the serving in 
this match was exceptional 
with Carrie Walker having 
four service aces and 
O'Rourke having three. 

The next opponent was Rob- 
ert Morris College. ITiis team 
appeared to have the most 
ability but were unable to pull 
it together as Clarion was 
again victorious 15-7, 15-3, 15- 
6. 

Buck and Pezek were tied 
for the most kills with eight 
each. Wolfe was close behind 
with seven. 

Pezek was also tied with 
Carrie Walker, both having 
four service aces. 

"Walker was a real force at 
the net. She has very strong 
offensive play," said Opalski. 




GOOD HIT. 

a return. 



.Clarion's Barb Buck delivers a smash as Jodi Pezek readies for 
Photo by Chuck Lizza, Staff Photographer 



Three of the Lady Eagles 
were named to the all-tourna- 
ment team. Buck, Pezek, and 
O'Rourke were selected from 
all the teams which were 
there. 

Buck's total statistics for 
the tournament werer 28 kills, 
47 attempts and 2 errors. 

Pezek finished with 20 kills, 
33 attempts and 5 errors. 

O'Rourke had an excellent 
setting game with 201 sets and 
only 16 errors. This is a 92% 
efficiency average. 

The top overall standings to 
date include Buck with 70 
kills, 155 attempts, and 18 er- 



rors. This averages out to a 
.336% hitting average. 

Pezek is second in hitting 
with 55 kills, 25 errors, 139 at- 
tempts and a .216% average. 

Rourke has an outstand- 
ing setting efficiency average 
at .937%. "For every 10 times 
Missy sets, less than 1% of the 
time she will make an error," 
said Opalski. "Any setter with 
an average of over 900 is a 
very effective setter." 
O'Rourke also holds 17 service 
aces to date. 

This weekend the team will 
travel to Malone CoUege for a 
tournament. 



At California 



Eagles open Conference play 



Clarion University, fresh 
off its 34-13 gridiron win at 
Ferris State, will travel to 
California University this 
Saturday for the PSAC-West- 
ern Division opener for both 
schools. Kickoff at Cal's 
Adamson Stadium is set for 
1:30 p.m. 



The Golden Eagles, under 
fifth year head coach Gene 
Sobolewski, enter Saturday's 
contest with a 1-1 overall rec- 
ord in 1987. The Golden 
Eagles lost the season opener 
versus Fairmont State (14- 
8), but bounced back at Fer- 
ris State last Saturday for a 



34-13 win. 

California, led by 7th year 
head coach Jeff Petrucci, en- 
ters Saturday's tilt with a 1-2 
overall slate, having lost the 
opener against Wayne State 
(9-3), then defeated West- 
minster (20-7), but lost a 
close contest to Salem last 



Saturday (21-13). 

"I'm expecting this to be a 
typical, hard-hitting, Clar- 
ion-California matchup," 
said Clarion head coach 
Gene Sobolewski. "The 
trademarks of both teams 
show a very physical brand 

(See Eagles. ..Page 21) 



20— THE CLARION CALL, Clarion, PA, Thursday, Sept. 24, 1987 



Big win for Eagles 



byRickKapres. 
Sports Staff Writer 



Injured quarterback Doug 
Emminger returned to the 
Golden Eagle starting lineup 
Saturday and sparked the 
team to a 34-13 victory at Fer- 
ris State. 

Tlie senior tri-captain, who 
missed Clarion's opener with 
a knee injury, riddled the Fer- 
ris State secondary for a 
school record 366 yards and 
three touchdowns. For his ef- 
forts Emminger was named 
PSAC West Player of the 
Week. 

Junior wideout Ron Ur- 
bansky hauled in a seven yard 
pass in the comer of the end- 
zone which broke a third quar- 
ter 13-13 tie and put the Golden 
Eiagles out in front to stay. Ur- 
bansky was Emminger's pri- 
mary target thoughout the 
game, he caught nine passes 
for 138 yards and the ore 
score. 

In the season opener the of- 
fense struggled in a 14-8 loss to 
Fairmont State, but with Em- 
minger back the unit jelled, 
posting 10 first quarter points. 

The first points came on a 



26-yard field goal by senior 
kicker Phil Bujakowski. The 
Golden Eagles then increased 
the lead to 1(M) on a 12-yard 
pass from Emminger to Tony 
Giavedoni. 

Itie touchdown was set up 
by a Lou Weiers fumble re- 
covery. Weiers, the Golden 
Elagles' defensive captain also 
returned from an elbow injury 
that kept him out of the open- 
er. His presence on the field 
was felt often as he registered 
eight tackles along with the 
fumble recovery. 

In the second quarter both 
teams exchanged field goals. 
Qarion got a 36 yarder from 
Bujakowski, and FSU a 22- 
yard kick from Tony Svaluto. 
Svaluto also attempted a 29- 
yard field goal on the last play 
of the half, which was blocked 
by Clarion defensive back 
James Rachel. 

FSU tied the game in the 
third quarter on a 24-yard kick 
by Svaluto and a 55 yard pass 
from Dave DenBraber to 
Cedric Gordon. 

The Golden Eagles then 
took the lead for good on Ur- 
bansky's touchdown. The 



score culminated a 10-play 65- 
yard drive, which saw Em- 
minger regain his composure 
after being picked off twice by 
the Bulldog's Randy Jones. 

In the fourth period it was 
all Clarion. The Golden 
Eagles scored two td's 
making the final score 34-13. 
The first score came on a 
Keith PoweU four-yard run. 
The second on a 20-yard toss 
from Emminger to Mike 
"Buz" Brestensky. 

Ttie Golden Eagles' defense 
did an excellent job against a 
team that turned them for 352 
yards in the air in a 38-28 loss a 
year ago. 

Clarion sacked DenBraber 
four times and held wideout 
Cedric Gordon to just three 
catches. Gordon nabbed 10 
balls for 264 yards and three 
touchdowns in last season's 
contest. Linebacker Ken 
Raabe led all tacklers for the 
second week in a row with 15. 

Next week the Golden Ea- 
gles enter PSAC West play at 
California. The Vulcans, who 
enter the game 1-2, defeated 
Qarion 28-27 a year ago. 



Marines 



We^re looking for a few good men. 



Pennsylvania 




Leathernecks 



The UNITED STATES MARINE CORPS Officer Program 
PROUDLY CONGRATULATES 



Andrew Sauer 



meeting the high standards to successfully 

complete the rigorous summer training session 

at the Marine Officer Candidate School (OCS) 

in Quantico, Virginia 

Maybe you can be one of us 

Marine Officer Commissioning Programs 

Room 2001 Federal Building 

1000 Liberty Avenue 

Pittsburgh, PA 15222 

(412) 644-6310 




THE CLARION CALL, Clarion, PA, Thursday, Sept. 24, 1987-21 



QB DOUG EMMINGER 



Clarion Call File Photo 



Emminger PSAC 
Player of the Week 



Qarion University quari;er- 
back Doug Emminger has 
been named by the PSAC as 
ttie Pennsylvania State Ath- 
letic Conference Western Di- 
vision "Player of the Week", 
for his outstanding perform- 
ance in Clarion's 34-13 win at 
Ferris State College on Satur- 
day. 

Emminger, a 5-11, 180- 
pound, senior, quarterback 
from Kittanning, completed 22 
of 34 passes on Saturday, for a 
Clarion University single- 
game record of 366 yards, as 
well as three touchdown 
passes of 7, 12, and 20 yards. 
In his third year as the Golden 
Eagles' starting quarterback, 
Emminger missed most of the 
Fall 1987 Camp, as well as the 
first game of me season (a 14- 
8 loss against Fairmont St.), 
prior to Saturday's tilt. The 
Golden Eagles are now 1-1 
overall and will play at Cali- 
fornia University this Satur- 
day in the PSAC-Westem Di- 
vision opener for both schools. 

"Doug showed on Saturday 
why he is an integral part of 
making the offense go, noted 
head coach Gene Sobolewski. 



"He's a very smart player, 
who puts a lot of pressure on 
opposing defenses because of 
his ability to run and throw the 
football." 

Emminger's career stats 
now show him completing 242 
of 443 passes (54.6%) for 3.050 
yards and 17 td's. He is now 
fifth in all-time passing yards, 
fifth in career completions 
and owns Clarion records in 
single game completions (29) 
and passing yards in a game 
(366). Last season, Emminger 
completed 148 of 269 psses for 
1,926 yards and 11 td^s. 

A Conmiunication major at 
Clarion, Emminger is the son 
of Judith E. Enuninger and 
the late James Enuninger of 
1124 N. Grant Street, Kit- 
tanning. He is a 1964 graduate 
of Kittanning High School. 



CLARION NOTES: Em- 
minger has now won the PSAC-West 
"Player of the Week" honors three 
times in his career. Last season he 
earned the honor against Westmin- 
ster, while in 1985 he coi^)ed the 
award against Lock Haven. 

(Story courtesy of Rich Herman, 
PSACSID) 



SPORTS CALENDAR 

SEPTEMBER 

25 Tennis at Gannon 

Volleyball at Malone College 

26 Football at California University of Pa. 
Tennis at Mercyhurst 

Volleyball at Malone College 

Men's and Women's X-Country at Pitt/Bradford Inv. 

National Hunting and Fishing Day 

29 Tennis vs. Slippery Rock at Home, 3 p.m. 

30 Volleyball at Gannon with University of Buffalo 



From the Che ap Seats 



by Robert DiDomenico, 

Sports Staff Writer 

Let's tab this one as the article 
that need not be written. Prog- 
nosticators all over the country 
will have nothing to do on their 
favorite day of the week but pon- 
der petty issues such as the 
meaning of life or the effect of the 
Persian Gulf War on the econ- 
omy. 

Y^, fans, the NFL strike will 
ruin the Sundays of many football 
fanatics across the country. Peo- 
ple have considered what the 
strike will do to the owners, 
coaches and players, but what 
about us fans? Will we be resign- 
ed to Sundays of bowling, golf, 
gymnastics and aquestrian horse 
races? Or, even worse, the Ca- 
nadian Football League? 

Personally, the Pre-eminent 
one feels the best sutetitute for 
NFL Sundays would be to have an 
Olympics of Sports Illustrated 
swimsuit gals. I can just hear it 
now: "Gee Merlin, I'd give EUe 
McPherson a 9.5 for just about 
anything." But while we're on the 
subject of the absurd, let's con- 
sider the NFL strike and a few of 
its major issues: 

Free agent compensation: Un- 
der the current bargaining agree- 
ment, any team that signs a free 
agent from another team owes 
compensation to the team they 
sign him from. The amount of 
compensation is determined by 
arbitration, but for top line 
players like John Elway or 
Lawrence Taylor, compensation 
is a first and second round draft 
choice. 

The players cry that this makes 
signing free agents undesirable 
to owners and it forces free 
agents to resign with their ori- 
ginal teams at l^s than what 
they'd expect in the free agent 
market. This may be true, but 
some form of compensation is 
definitely necessary or the NFL 
will have a similar situation to 
that of baseball in the mid-1970's 
when salaries went up 360% 
under union leadership. 

Baseball owners decided com- 



pensation was the only solution, 
and NFL players must realize 
that also or they'll be carrying 
signs instead of footballs for a 
long period of time. 

Playing surfaces: There are 
six indoor stadiums in the NFL. It 
doesn't take a biology major to 
realize that grass do^n't grow 
indoors. But what about the 
league's other 23 outdoor sta- 
diums? Twelve are artificial turf 
and 11 are grass. There is no rea- 
son in the world for an outdoor 
stadium to have turf. The owners 
say that grass costs too much to 
maintain, but come on guys! If 
you're not gonna show some loy- 
alty and care for your players, 
why should they be loyal to you? 

The statistics that show injur- 
ies increase on artificial turf are 
well-documented. The players 
have said they'd take a pay cut if 
they could be sure that the money 
would go to installing grass 
fields. An arbitrator should step 
in here and legally force the 
owners to install grass fields or 
move to a stadium with grass. 

Union Unity: The show of 
solidarity at the beginning of 
each game hasn't fooled the Pre- 
eminent one. The number of play- 
ers who say they won't strike has 
increased every week since train- 
ing camp. John Elway will lose 
$62,000 per game during the 
strike. Where will the hearts of 
players who make that much be, 
on the picket line or on the foot- 
baU field? The idea of scab play- 
ers isn't appealing to anyone, but 
it does weaken the union position. 
So does the effects of the big loss 
the players took in the strike of 
1962. 

My picks from last week were a 
humble 94-1, for a percentage of 
69. That tie between the Broncos 
and Packers has everyone baf- 
fled. If by some major miracle 
there are NFL games this Sun- 
day, here will be the outcomes : 

Steelera over Jets: The physi- 
cal play of the Steelers usually 
prevails over inconsistent finesse 
teams like the Jets. 

Saints over Falcons: I refuse to 
believe that Scott Campbell is the 



answer in Atlanta. 

Dallas over Buffalo: I was im- 
pressed with the Bills come-from- 
behind victory against the Oilers, 
but I was more impressed with 
the dallas defense against the 
Giants. 

Chicago over Detroit: Just how 
long have the Lions mired in 
mediocrity? How long will it last? 

Rams over Bengals: Can the 
Bengals and Sam Wyche recover 
from last week's debacle against 
the 49ers? TTiey're hoping for a 
strike in Cincy. 

Bucs over Packers: But you 

wouldn't blame me if I went the 
other way in this one, would ya? 

Cardinals over Colts: The 
Cards have come on strong at the 
end of the game the last two 
weeks. They won't have to wait 
that long against the Colts. 

Raiders over Oilers: The Silver 
and Black could be awesome if a 
QB emerges from the scrap heap 
of Wilson, Hilger, Plunkett and 
Beuerlein. Hilger's leading right 
now. 

Minnesota over Kansas City: 
Even with Wade Wilson at the 
hebn, the Vikes are starting out 
tough this year. 

Giants over Dolphins: People 
are referring to the Giants as the 
ex-champs. I wouldn't want to be 
the E>oli^ins this Sunday. 

New England over 

Washington: Despite Doug Wil- 
liams' arm and experience, the 
Skins need Jay Schroeder playing 
to beat teams as good as the 
Patriots. 

49ers over Eagles: Hie Niners 
are finally at home and maybe 
that lamcMluck victory in Cincy 
will put a light under their fire. 

Seattle over San Diego: Though 
the Seahawks aren't much of a 
road team, they showed their po- 
tential by blowing out the Chiefs 
last week and should do so here. 

Browns over Broncos: The 
Browns are still seething over 
that loss in last year's champion- 
ship game. They should get some 
slight revenge. 



Eagles.... 



(Continued from Page 19) 



On the Run... 

(Continued from Page 19) 

On the other hand I don't think 
the management should try to 
continue the season with free 
agent players, though they may 
be talented, they weren't good 
enough to play at the beginning of 
the season so why should they 
play now. 
On the brighter side: 
•Penn State 41, Cincinnati 
•Temple 24, Pitt 21 
•Florida 23, Alabama 14 
•The Pirates are now out of the 
basement and have won 12 of 
their last 15. 
In a personal note: 
•Last week The Pre-eminent 
One was welcomed back to his fa- 
miliar column here in the sports 
section of The Call. The Pre-dim- 
inent One was up to his familiar 
tricks, picking all the favorites 
and making remarks about Penn 
State and yours truly. Since I will 
not lower myself to going into a 
verbal battle with the Pre-what- 
ever I will just say that this dis- 
pute that started last year, is yet 
to be settled. 




LAST YEAR'S SCENE. . .The Golden Eagles hope to reverse the 1986 re- 
sults of their game with PSAC West foe California. Clarion Call File Photo 



of football and I know that's 
how both teams will play this 
game. Cal has displayed an 
outstanding defense thus far 
this season, the number one 
ranked defense in the Western 
Division thus far, and I think 
that will be a big test for our 
offense. California also pos- 
sesses a complicated offensive 
scheme that will give our de- 
fense a stem test. All in all, 
this has traditionally been a 
game that you can throw the 
book away on, because it 
usually turns into a war." 

That last fact has certainly 
been true the last two seasons. 
In 1965, Clarion was behind 23- 
3 at halftime at California, but 
stormed back for 21 unanswer- 
ed second half points to win 24- 
23. Last season Garion held a 
27-7 fourth quarter lead, but 
Cal fired three, fourth quarter 
touchdowns to win 28-27 in the 
waning moments. 

Clarion's offense came alive 
last Saturday at Ferris State, 
under the direction of senior, 
quarterback Doug Emming- 
er. Emminger, who was side- 
lined in the Clarion opener 
with a knee injury, completed 
22 of 34 aerials for 366 yards 
and three td's. Clarion's of- 
fense accumulated 466 yards 
of total offense last Saturday, 
and is now averaging 302.5 
yards of total offense per 
game. In the backfield with 
Emminger will be tailbacks 
Sean Morrissey and Ken 
Dworek, along with fullbacks 
Mick Kehoe and Keith Powell. 
Morrissey has gained 80 yards 
this season on 25 carries, with 
Dworek netting 68 yards and 
one td on 23 attempts. At full- 
back, Kehoe has netted 17 
yards on 10 carries, while 
Powell has toted the pigskin 
nine times for 31 yards and 
one td. 

Hie Clarion receiving corps 
are led by wideouts Ron Ur- 
bansky, Mike Brestensky and 
Tony Giavedoni, along with 
tight ends Dan Hastings and 
Jerry Starr. Urbansky caught 
nine passes last week for 138 
yards and now has 10 catches 
for 155 yards and 1 td. Bres- 
tensky is next in line grabbing 
7 aerials for 102 yards and 1 to, 
with Giavedoni clutching 4 
passes for 56 yards and 1 td. 
Hastings meanwhile has 3 
grabs for 76 yards and Stan- 
checks in with 1 catch for 14 
yards. 

The offensive line is led by 
right tackle Pat Prenatt, who 
continues his outstanding 
play, along with 1986 AP HM 
AD-America center Jerry Fe- 
dell and right guard John Sea- 
man. Prenatt was a second 
team conference choice last 
year, while Fedell and Sea- 
man were first team confer- 
ence selections. 

The California defense cur- 
rently leads the PSAC-West- 
em Division in total defense, 
permitting only 242 yards per 
game. Breaking that stat 



down, Cal permits 130.3 yards 
on the ground, but a mere 
111.7 passing. 

Up {font, Cal is led by nose- 
guard Glenn Richards and de- 
fensive end Craig May. Cal's 
linebackers have traditionally 
been the strength of the group 
and 1987 is no exception. Mike 
Stephany and Tom Cawoski 
lead the way in the middle. 
The secondary group is head- 
ed by comer Mike Grashion, 
strong safety John Hay and 
free safety Mark Martin. Cal's 
defense is yielding only 12.3 
points per game. 

The Vulcan offense cer- 
tainly misses All-America 
quarterback Brendan Folmar 
who has graduated. The "0" 
is averaging 95.7 vards per 
game on the grouna, 119.3 per 
game passing, for a total of- 
fensive output of 215 yards per 
game. 

Expected to start at quar- 
terback is Sam Mannery, who 
has completed 33 of 60 passes 
for 294 yards and 1 td. He has 
tossed four interceptions. In 
the backfield with Mannery 
are running backs Ken Poling, 
Jim Cassandro, Steve Brown 
and Sean Densmore. Poling, 
the leading runner, has 115 
yards on 24 carries. Cassan- 
dro has 61 yards on 22 carries, 
while Densmore has collected 
67 yards on 10 carries and 
Brown, who missed one game, 
has 26 yards and 2 td's in 
seven attempts. 

Ed Alford, an all-conference 
performer, leads the Vulcan 
receivers with 13 catches for 
131 yards. Terry O'Shea, also 
an all-conference selection, 
has clutched 6 passes for 52 
yards and runner Poling has 
snared six aerials for 77 yards 
and 1 td. 

Trying to stop the usually 
potent Vulcan offense is a 
Clarion defense that seems to 
be coming together. The Gold- 
en Eagles are permitting 265 
yards of total offense per 
game, which breaks down to 
77 yards per game on the 
ground and 188 passing. The 
Eagles are first in the PSAC- 
West in rushing defense and 
third in the West in total de- 
fense. 

Up front. Clarion saw 1986 
3rd team AP All-America 
tackle Lou Weiers retum to 
action last Saturday after sit- 
ting out the opener with an el- 
bow injury. Weiers had nine 
stops, 1 qb sack and a fumble 
recovery in his first contest. 
Joining him up front will be 
Mark Jones and Jim Keller at 
noseguard, and Mark Kelly or 
Tim Shook at the other tackle 
spot. 

In the middle, linebackers 
Ken Raabe and Dan Taylor 
are leading the Eagle defense. 
Raabe, a first team all-con- 
ference selection in 1986, leads 
the Eagles with 37 tackles and 
1 broken up pass in two 
games. Taylor meanwhile has 
posted 16 stops. 




No more drinking 
At Vol. games 



WINNING PLAY Lady Eagle Volleyballers Tammy V\lo\W7, Jodi Pezek H, and Dianne Guenther #8 show off their 

tournament winning form. Photo by Chuck Lizza, Staff Photographer 



KNOXVILLE, TN (CPS) - 
After a major controversy, 
the University of Tennessee 
has decided to apply its no- 
drinking-on-campus rules to 
nonstudents, too. 

On Sept. 1, the school's ath- 
letic department reversed an 
earlier decision, and banned 
alcohol from the expensive 
new stadium sky boxes it 
leases to corporations and 
alumni. 

Earlier this sunmier, as the 
luxury stadium boxes were 
under construction, Tennessee 
officials said patrons would be 
allowed to store and drink al- 



Full slate for fall intramurals 



by Frank Ashton, 
Sports Staff Writer 



The intramural program 
here at Qarion is gearing up 
another slateful of events for 
the part-time student-athletes co-rec voUeyball 



Sept. 20 and the teams should 
be seeing action soon. 

Some of the other sports 
that are coming up are men's 
water basketball, co-rec 
soccer, women's, men's, and 



on campus. 

The program is already 
working on getting some 
sports off and running. These 
include men's flag football, 
women's softbaU^faU golf for 
both men and women, and 
mixed doubles tennis. 

The rosters for these activi- 



All these rosters are due by 
the end of the day Friday, 
Sept. 25. 

To round out the Fall semes- 
ter's schedule of events, the 
intramural program has 
bowling for men and women, 
basketball foul shooting for 
men and women, and men's 



ties were turned in on Sunday, and women's singles badmin- 



ton. 

Roster due dates for these 
activities will be posted as 
they are announced. 

Basic information about the 
intramural program follows. 

Tlie intramural office is lo- 
cated on the second floor of 
Tippin gymnasium, near the 
entrance. Also located there is 
a final standings board, an in- 
formation-bulletin board and 
the intramural roster box. 

M rosters must be in the 
box by the end of the day of 
which they are due. Rosters 
not in the box will not be ac- 



cepted. 

Any protests must be in 
written form and also placed 
in the box. 

The first and second place 
teams receive trophies with 
individual medals for each 
member of the team. 

All rules and roster forms 
may be obtained from the 
proper boxes on the wall just 
inside the second floor en- 
trance. 

Participants should check 
The Call every week for 
scores, standings and infor- 
mation . 



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cohol in the 42 sky boxes be- 
cause they are considered leas- 
edjproperty. 

Except for a faculty club, 
they would be the only places 
on campus where people are 
allowed to drink liquor, since 
the Board of Trustees barred 
alcohol from the campus 
vfYnen the state raised its min- 
imum legal drinking age to 21. 

"Tliere was quite an up- 
roar," Tennessee Student 
Government Association 
President Rusty Gray said. 

"A lot of people felt very un- 
happy about it. This is a dry 
campus. Alcohol is not allow- 
ed on campus. All of a sudden 
ttiere's a designated area for 
alcohol, and students felt like 
that was unfair." 

"Tliis showed that they lis- 
tened to what we had to say," 
Gray explained. "It was a 
good decision." 

"The university felt like it 
was in its best interests to 
have a consistent policy on al- 
cohol on campus, said Ten- 
nessee Associate Athletic Di- 
rector Mitdi Bamhart. 

"While the boxes were 
being leased," Tennessee 
Executive Vice President Joe 
Johnson said, "alcohol came 
up. Since the sky boxes pro- 
vide a controlled environ- 
ment, and is separate from 
the rest of the stadium, we felt 
that what ever a person does, 
as long as it's legal and ethi- 
cal, should be a decision made 
by the person who leases the 
box." 

When students objected and 
pressured the trustees to re- 
view the issue, Tennessee's 
athletic department decided 
to ban liquor from the boxes. 

"Tlie questions raised by 
students were legitimate, 
Johnson said. "Since the is- 
sues were being raised, we 
decided we'd go back to where 
we were." 

Despite the ban on alcohol, 
all 42 of the sky boxes — which 
rent for $24,000 a year — have 
been leased, Barnhart said. 
"We haven't had any cancel- 
lations." 

Allowing drinking in sta- 
dium sky boxes has become 
an issue on other campuses as 
well. 

Last week, the University of 
Arizona's regents debated — 
but failed to decide — whether 
to let fans drink alcohol in the 
sky boxes to be built at Ari- 
zona Stadium, where liquor is 
otherwise banned. 



SPORTS 
TIP 



CALL 
2380 



PSAC 



THE CLARION CALL, Clarion, PA, Thursday, Sept. 24, 1987-23 



Conference play on Saturday 



Tlie 1987 PSAC (Pennsylva- 
nia State Athletic Conference) 
Eastern and Western Divi- 
sions will begin conference 
play this Saturday with aU 14 
teams looking to gain the lone 
Eastern and Western Division 
berth for the 28th annual 
^AC Championship Game. 
This year's PSAC Title game 
will be hosted by the Eastern 
Division winner on Nov. 21. 

A total of three divisional 
contests are set to be played in 
each division this week, along 
with one non-league matchup. 

In the Eastern Division, de- 
fending champion WEST 
CHESTER travels to 
BLOOMSBURG to take on the 
Huskies, who won the East 
Title in 1985. Other East 
matchups include EAST 
STROUDSBURG traveling to 
MILLERSVILLE, plus 
CHEYNEY hitting the road to 
MANSFIELD. 

Defending Western Division 
Champion INDIANA (also the 
1986 PSAC Champion) plays 
the lone non-conference clash 
on Saturday, playing host to 
American International Col- 
lege. The three West games 
include CLARION at CALI- 
FORNIA, EDINBORO visit- 

The Call 
Mailbox 

Give a Hoot 

Dear Editor, 

I believe there is a certain cam- 
pus-wide problem which needs to be 
addressed. 

In the past, the campus proper of 
Clarion University has always been 
very beautiful and well-maintained. 
This year, however, it seems this is 
not the case. 

Each day, as I walk around cam- 
pus, I see more and more trash 
strewn about the lawns and side- 
walks of Clarion University. I see 
broken bottles, smashed cola cans, 
cups filled with snuff spit, burger 
containers from the local fast-food 
chains and cigarette butts from one 
end of campus to the other. 

Tills situation, for me, is com- 
pletely unacceptable. Clarion (both 
town and University) is our home for 
most of the year. I have always 
taken great pride in the cleanliness 
and beauty found here. It hurts me 
to see people wantonly violating the 
rich beauty of nature. 

Tliis is not the University of Pitts- 
burgh and we are not in Oakland. We 
have no trash-producing businesses 
lining the sidewalks of our campus. 
Any garbage that finds it way on 
campus has been brought there and 
left Uiere by students and this is very 
discouraging. 

So all I ask is that we, as a com- 
munity, become more aware of our 
beautiful environment and keep it 
clean and enjoyable for many years 
to come. 

Sincerely, 
Mike Downing 
English Grad. 



ing SLIPPERY ROCK and 
LOCK HAVEN at 

SHIPPENSBURG. 

KUTZTOWN has the week 
off, but will return to Eastern 
Division play on Oct. 3. 

A pair of quarterbacks won 
the Western and Eastern Di- 
vision "Player of the Week" 
honors last Saturday for their 
outstanding performances. 
Clarion University quarter- 
back Doug Emnunger took 
West honors, with Blooms- 
burg University quarterback 
Jay DeDea gaining the East 
spot. 

Emminger, a 5-11, 180- 
pound, senior, quarterback 
from Kittanning, led Clarion 
to a 34-13 win at Ferris State 
College (ML). Emminger 
completed 22 of 34 passes for 
366 yards (366 yards a school 
record) and three touchdowns 
in the Clarion win. 

DeDea, a 6-3, 220-pound, 
senior, quarterback from Al- 
toona, led Bloomsburg to a 25- 

6 victory at Lock Haven. 
DeDea completed 19 of 36 
passes for 244 yards and two 
tDUchdowns for the Huskies. 

The PSAC "Play of the 
Week" came in Edinboro's 14- 

7 win over Central Connect- 



icut. Edinboro quarterback J 
im Ross (Euclid, Ohio), late in 
the third quarter, lofted a deep 
pass to wide receiver Daryl 
Cameron (Aliquippa). The 



pass bounced off the (Antral 
Connecticut defender's shoul- 
der pad, into the arms of 
Cameron, who scored the 
Fighting Scots' game-winning 



td, a 27-yard td pass. That 
score put the Scots ahead 14-7 
and Edinboro held on for the 
win. 

(Story courtesy of Rich Herman, 
PSACSID). 




PSAC ACTION Conference play in the PSAC opens up this Saturday. The action will be hard-hitting as evidenced 

by John Beslc's hit on an I.U.P. runner. Clarion Call File Photo 



■miHii^m^^^^i 




PSAC STATS 








WESTERN 








OVERALL 




DIVISION 


WL-T 


PF 


PA 


WL-T 


PF 


PA 


Edinboro 


0-0-0 


000 


00 


2-1-0 


43 


30 


Clarion 


0-0-0 


000 


000 


1-1-0 


42 


27 


Indiana 


0-0-0 


000 


000 


1-1-0 


17 . 


38 


Shippensburg 


0-0-0 


000 


000 


1-1-0 


23 


33 


California 


0-0-0 


000 


000 


1-2-0 


36 


37 


Lock Haven 


0-0-0 


000 


000 


1-2-0 


26 


49 


Slippery Rock .... 


0-0-0 


000 


000 


1-2-0 


47 


77 


EASTERN 










DIVISION 


w-L-T 


PF 


PA 


W-L-T 


PF 


PA 


Millersvllle 


0-0-0 


000 


000 


2-0-0 


65 


40 


Bloomsburg 


0-0-0 


000 


000 


2-1-0 


66 


42 


Cheyney 


0-0-0 


000 


000 


2-1-0 


36 


23 


West Chester .... 


0-0-0 


000 


000 


2-1-0 


82 


38 


E. Stroudsburg . . . 


0-0-0 


000 


000 


1-1-0 


18 


26 


Mansfield 


0-0-0 


000 


000 


1-1-0 


37 


44 


Kutztown 


0-0-0 


000 


000 


0-3-0 


39 


72 


^Hi^HHI^^^^^HH 



CLARION CINEMAS 



GARBY 226-8521 



MA^A^SUN.1:00 

STAKEOUT 
7:30 & 9:30 

MATINEE SAT. & SUN. AT 1:00 

THE LOST BOYS 

7:30 & 9:30 

MATINEE SAT. & SUN. AT 1:00 



ORPHEUM 226-7010 



Mat. Sat. & Sun. 3:00 

HOUSE II 

7:30 & 9.30 

MATINEE SAT. & SUN. AT 3:00 

THREE KINDS 
OF HEAT 

7:30 & 9:30 

MATINEE SAT. ft SUN. AT 3:00 



BARGAIN NITE: 
MON.&TUES. 

ALL SEATS $2.50 

FREE POPCORN COUPON 



P Wonjdeo ^ 

A FOREIGN FILM FIESTA 

Including the 1987 foreign film nominees: 

• THE DECLINE OF THE AMERICAN EMPIRE 

• BETTY BLUE 



ALSO: 



Mon.-Thur. 10-8 
Fri.-Sat. 10-9 



Moscow Does Not Believe In Tears 

LinaWertmueller's Films 

Kurosawa's Films 

1 1 S. 6TH Ave. 

Five Bergman Films clarion, pa i6214| 

(814)226-5872 



COLLEGIO'S 

ITALIAN RESTAURANT 

TUES& SAT SPECIAL MEATBALL PARMESAN 

HOAGIE 

$2.60 

SAUSAGE PARMESAN 
HOAGIE 

:.60 

SMALL STROMBOLI 

1.50 



LARGE PIZZA 
$3.99 ■• 

5T.m.- close ''■-'"'' 



$2. 



FRIDAY SPECIAL 

LASAGNE 



$3. 



$2.99 

11 - close 



FREE DELIVERY 11 AM-cIose 
NO DELIVERY ON SPECIALS 

518 MAIN STREET 

226-5421 



24-THE CLARION CALL, Clarion, PA, Thursday, Sept. 24. 1987 




o e f> o 



by Michael A. Sexauer 
Assistant Sports Editor 



When Clarion University 
offensive center Jerry FedeU 
was red-shirted in 1984 with a 
spinal injury, more than one 
area doctor told him that his 
football career was over. 

However, with the help of an 
excellent Pittsburgh chiro- 
practor, Jerry Fedell is now 
altering his fourth year as a 
lineman for the Golden Ea- 
gles. 

While playing football at 
North Hills High School, 
Fedell felt that, until his 
senior year, he "didn't take 
the game seriously enough. ' ' 

During his senior year at of- 
fensive center and defensive 
end, Fedell decided that foot- 
ball was his sport. It was this 
decision that earned Fedell his 
starting position with the 
Golden Eagles. 

Moving from guard as a 
freshman to tackle as a sopho- 
more was an easy and com- 
fortable transition for Fedell. 
Tlie move from tackle to cen- 
ter his iunior year wasn't as 
easy admits Fedell. Concen- 
tration and improved 
coordination were now even 
more a part of playing suc- 
cessfully. 

Tremendous upper body 
strength ang refmed skills as a 
one-on-one blocker have made 
it possible for #51 to play vir- 
tually all offensive Ime posi- 



on Jerry Fedell 



bons. 

FedeU's intelligence as an 
offensive lineman and pass 
protector earned him an Asso- 
ciated Press Honorable Men- 
tion All American at the of- 
fensive center position in 1986. 



and a love for the game" was 
their way, said FeoeU. 

Fedell's intelligent playing 
ability is reflected in the class- 
room. With an above 3.0 QPA 
and a dual major of market- 
ing and biology, FedeU plans 



'Life is like a free two-minute shopping spree in 



a supermarket " 

Tlie chances of Fedell re- 
peating his All American per- 
formance of last year are 
good. Even though knee sur- 
gery this past spring may 
have, at one time, oeen a fac- 
tor. 

Trips twice a week to Brook- 
ville are still needed, but Fe- 
dell feels that the knee is near- 
ing full recovery. 

When asked about his rela- 
tionship with the team, Jerry 
laughs and tells of his reputa- 
tion as a practical joker. Stor- 
ies of some of his past pranks 
are humorous, but unfortun- 
ately, are not appropriate for 
printing. 

Fedell enjoys the exper- 
ience of playing football at 
Qarion with his teanmiates. 
He especially enjoyed the ex- 
perience of playing football 
with former Qarion letterman 
Chuck Duffy. 

Duffy's style of playing re- 
minded Fedell of his favorite 
pro star; former Steeler Ernie 
Holmes. "Reckless abandon 



—J. Fedell 



to graduate in December. 

Not actively interviewing in 
his field, Fedell is waiting for 
pro scouting reports before 
pursuing a career in phar- 
maceutical or bio-technical 
sales. 

The unpredictability and 
many times unpleasantness of 
Clarion weather has often 
made watching Golden Eagle 
football a chore at best. How- 
ever, Fedell recognizes and 
appreciates the support of his 
parents as they cheer through 
some of these days of less- 
than-perfect weather. 

As a player, student, and 
even practical joker, Jerry 
Fedell does his best. And, he 
saves this one particular 
thought about life in general : 

"Life is like a free two- 
minute shopping spree in 
a supermarket - you bet- 
ter stuff all you can into 
your basket because you 
know time is going to run 
out soon " 




JERRY FEDELL 

Photo by Mike Bordo, Photography Editor 







Robin Hood Effect 



President parades to explain tuition 



(CPS)— A variety of coUege 
officials came to Washington 
last week to explain why stu- 
dents' tuitions are rising so 
fast. 

Speakers from Washington 
University of St. Louis, the 
University of Missouri, Cali- 
fornia at Los Angeles and the 
American Council on Educa- 
tion among others, paraded 
before the House Subcom- 



mittee on Postsecondary Edu- 
cation Sept. 14-16 to defend 
themselves against U.S. Sec- 
retary of Education William 
Bennett's assertion that many 
tuition increases are unneces- 
sary. 

"Department of Education 
officials have criticized 
campus officials because 
tuition has been rising faster 
than inflation in recent 



years," complained UCLA's 
Dr. Kenneth Green. 

"However, what they have 
not (said) is that campuses 
are allocating more funds for 
student aid because fewer col- 
lege students are now eligible 
to participate in various 
federal aid programs. ' ' 

"In most instances," said 
Arthur Hauptman of the 
American Council on 
Education, "the increase in 



aid has been financed by 
larger tuitions charged to all 
students. This is sometimes 
referred to as the Robin Hood 
effect." 

University of Missouri Pre- 
sident C. Peter Magrath con- 
ceded that tuition in Missouri 
has gone up an average of 11 
percent during the 80s, as the 
Consumer Price Index (CPI) 
has risen an average of only 
5.3 percent. 




But during the 70s, he 
added, tuition increased 6-2 
percent while the CPI went up 
at a faster rate of 7-5 percent 
a year. 

But Asst. Education Sec- 
retary Chester Finn, himself a 
former Vanderbilt professor, 
charged many colleges "may 
not be maximizing efforts to 
hold down costs." thus 
avoiding the need to raise 
tuition. 



Thursday, Oct. 1,1987 



LARION « CALL 



UiniuEtiitij of £p£nn±LfL(jania 



Faculty contract includes pay raise 



by Suzanne Halleman, 
News Staff Writer 



New proposals for faculty 
contracts were voted on Sep- 
tember 29 and 30. The tenta- 
tive contract included changes 
in salary, health and welfare, 
faculty professional develop- 
ment, continuing education, 
and fringe benefits. 

Under the terms of the pro- 
posed three-year contract, 
faculty will receive a five per- 



cent raise for the first year, 
additional five percent for the 
second year, and a 5.5 percent 
increase for the third year. 

The old agreement has 
seven steps labeled A through 
G. Any faculty who has reach- 
ed step G would have to re- 
main there. "The new 
agreement proposes a G+1 
step, which is 5 percent higher 
than Step G," said Mr. Wil- 
liam Fulmer, President of 



Qarion Chapter of APSCUF 
(Association of Pennsylvania 
State College and University 
Faculty). "It will be adminis- 
tered for all faculty who have 
served for eight years or more 
at Step G of their respective 
rank as of the Fall 1987 to be 
given in January of 1989." For 
faculty who have served four 
to seven years at Step G of 
their respective rank, the new 
proposed G-l-1 Step will in- 



ir^a^m-^ 








COLOR ME BEAUTIFUL. 

tage below. 



.The Autumn Leaf Festival falls into full bloom as nature drops leaves into an artistic mon- 

Photo by David Schorr, Staff Photographer 



crease 5 percent as of Sep- 
tember 1989. 

In the terms of the proposed 
contract, an increase of 10 
cents over three years will be 
divided as zero cents the first 
year, five cents the second 
year, and five cents the third 
year under the Health and 
Welfare policy. Each cent is 
equivalent to $19.50 per facul- 
ty member, per year. 

Under the new terms, the 
agreement will provide 
$100,000, $200,000, and $400,000 
respectively over the three 
years for Faculty Professional 
Development such as pro- 
grams, grants and activities. 

Non-credit continuing edu- 
cation courses are offered in 
the agreement to faculty 
members who are qualified to 
teach it first, before the ad- 
ministration may offer it to a 
non-faculty member, as it is in 
the old agreement. 

"Major Medical coverage 
has a tentative increase from 
$25 - $350,000 per member, and 
maximum life insurance cov- 
erage increase from $40 - 
$50,000," said Fulmer. Final- 
ly, a proposed tuition remis- 
sion for children of deceased, 
disabled or retired faculty will 
be included in the contract 
agreements. 

Voting took place Septem- 
ber. Ballots will be counted 
October 5 by the Nominations 
and Elections Committee, and 
the decision will be dispersed 
October 6. 




AUTUMN SMILES. . .A cool fall eve- 
ning and some fun downtow/n at 
the Autumn Leaf Festival is all this 
boy needs to cast a warm smile on 
his face. 

Clarion Call File Photo 



The 1987 

Autumn Leaf 
Festival Parade 

on 

Main Street 

Saturday 

at noon 



Autumn Leaf Events 
Schedule 

News — Page 6 



Weekly 
Crossword Puzzle 

Features — Page 17 



Cross Country Team 
Runs Undefeated 

Sports — Page 19 



Godspell to 
highlight ALF 

Features — Page 11 



f 



24-THE CLARION CALL, Clarion, PA, Thursday, Sept. 24, 1987 





potligh 



® <D ® ® 



by Michael A. Sexauer 
Assistant Sports Editor 

When Clarion University 
offensive center Jerry Fedell 
was red-shirted in 1984 with a 
spinal injury, more than one 
area doctor told him that his 
football career was over. 

However, with the help of an 
excellent Pittsburgh chiro- 
practor. Jerry Fedell is now 
entering his fourth year as a 
lineman for the Golden Ea- 
gles. 

While playing football at 
North Hills High School, 
Fedell felt that, until his 
senior year, he "didn't take 
the game seriously enough. ' ' 

During his senior year at of- 
fensive center and defensive 
end, Fedell decided that foot- 
ball was his sport. It was this 
decision that earned Fedell his 
starting position with the 
Golden Eagles. 

Moving from guard as a 
freshman to tackle as a sopho- 
more was an easy and com- 
fortable transition for Fedell. 
The move from tackle to cen- 
ter his junior year wasn't as 
easy admits Fedell. Concen- 
tration and improved 
coordination were now even 
more a part of playing suc- 
cessfully. 

Tremendous upper body 
strength and refined skills as a 
one-on-one blocker have made 
it possible for #51 to play vir- 
tually all offensive line posi- 



tions. 

Fedell's intelligence as an 
offensive lineman and pass 
protector earned him an Asso- 
ciated Press Honorable Men- 
tion All American at the of- 
fensive center position in 1986. 



on Jerry Fedell 



and a love for the game" was 
their way, said Fedell. 

Fedell's intelligent playing 
ability is reflected in the class- 
room. With an above 3.0 QPA 
and a dual major of market- 
ing and biology, Fedell plans 



"Life is like a free two-minute shopping spree in 
a supermarket " —J. Fedell 



The chances of Fedell re- 
peating his All American per- 
formance of last year are 
good. Even though loiee sur- 
gery this past spring may 
have, at one time, been a fac- 
tor. 

Trips twice a week to Brook- 
ville are still needed, but Fe- 
dell feels that the knee is near- 
ing full recovery. 

When asked about his rela- 
tionship with the team, Jerry 
laughs and tells of his reputa- 
tion as a practical joker. Stor- 
ies of some of his past pranks 
are humorous, but unfortun- 
ately, are not appropriate for 
printing. 

Fedell enjoys the exper- 
ience of playing football at 
Qarion with his teammates. 
He especially enjoyed the ex- 
perience of playing football 
with former Qarion letterman 
Chuck Duffy. 

Duffy's style of playing re- 
minded Fedell of his favorite 
pro star; former Steeler Ernie 
Holmes. "Reckless abandon 



to graduate in December. 

Not actively interviewing in 
his field, Fedell is waiting for 
pro scouting reports before 
pursuing a career in phar- 
maceutical or bio-technical 
sales. 

The unpredictability and 
many times unpleasantness of 
Clarion weather has often 
made watching Golden Eagle 
football a chore at best. How- 
ever, FedeU recognizes and 
appreciates the support of his 
parents as they cheer through 
some of these days of less- 
than-perfect weather. 

As a player, student, and 
even practical joker, Jerry 
Fedell does his best. And, he 
saves this one particular 
thought about life in general : 

"Life is like a free two- 
minute shopping spree in 
a supermarket - you bet- 
ter stuff all you can into 
your basket because you 
know time is going to run 
out soon " 




Robin Hood Effect 



JERRY FEDELL 

Photo by Mike Bordo, Photography Editor 




President parades to explain tuition 



(CPS)— A variety of college 
officials came to Washington 
last week to explain why stu- 
dents' tuitions are rising so 
fast. 

Speakers from Washington 
University of St. Louis, the 
University of Missouri, Cali- 
fornia at Los Angeles and the 
American Council on Educa- 
tion among others, paraded 
before the House Subcom- 



mittee on Postsecondary Edu- 
cation Sept. 14-16 to defend 
themselves against U.S. Sec- 
retary of Education William 
Bennett's assertion that many 
tuition increases are unneces- 
sary. 

"Department of Education 
officials have criticized 
campus officials because 
tuition has been rising faster 
than inflation in recent 



years," complained UCLA's 
Dr. Kenneth Green. 

"However, what they have 
not (said) is that campuses 
are allocating more funds for 
student aid because fewer col- 
lege students are now eligible 
to participate in various 
federal aid programs." 

"In most instances," said 
Arthur Hauptman of the 
American Council on 
Education, "the increase in 



aid has been financed by 
larger tuitions charged to all 
students. This is sometimes 
referred to as the Robin Hood 
effect." 

University of Missouri Pre- 
sident C. Peter Magrath con- 
ceded that tuition in Missouri 
has gone up an average of 11 
percent during the 80s, as the 
Consumer Price Index (CPI) 
has risen an average of only 
5.3 percent. 




But during the 70s, he 
added, tuition increased 6-2 
percent while the CPI went up 
at a faster rate of 7-5 percent 
a year. 

But Asst. Education Sec- 
retary Chester Finn, himself a 
former Vanderbilt professor, 
charged many colleges "may 
not be maximizing efforts to 
hold down costs." thus 
avoiding the need to raise 
tuition. 



Thursday, Oct 1,1987 



LARION « 



CALL 



CtaxLon %Lniu£.xi.iiij o( SP^nin5.ij[uan.ia 



Faculty contract includes pay raise 



by Suzanne Halleman, 
News Staff Writer 



New proposals for faculty 
contracts were voted on Sep- 
tember 29 and 30. The tenta- 
tive contract included changes 
in salary, health and welfare, 
faculty professional develop- 
ment, continuing education, 
and fringe benefits. 

Under the terms of the pro- 
posed three-year contract, 
faculty will receive a five per- 



cent raise for the first year, 
additional five percent for the 
second year, and a 5.5 percent 
increase for the third year. 

The old agreement has 
seven steps labeled A through 
G. Any faculty who has reach- 
ed step G would have to re- 
main there. "The new 
agreement proposes a G-fl 
step, which is 5 percent higher 
than Step G," said Mr. Wil- 
liam Fulmer, President of 



Qarion Chapter of APSCUF 
(Association of Pennsylvania 
State College and University 
Faculty). "It will be adminis- 
tered for all faculty who have 
served for eight years or more 
at Step G of their respective 
rank as of the Fall 1987 to be 
given in January of 1989." For 
faculty who have served four 
to seven years at Step G of 
their respective rank, the new 
proposed G-hl Step will in- 







COLOR ME BEAUTIFUL. . . .The Autum 
tage below. 



n Leaf Festival falls into full bloom as nature drops leaves into an artistic mon- 

Photo by David Schorr, Staff Photographer 



crease 5 percent as of Sep- 
tember 1989. 

In the terms of the proposed 
contract, an increase of 10 
cents over three years will be 
divided as zero cents the first 
year, five cents the second 
year, and five cents the third 
year under the Health and 
Welfare policy. Each cent is 
equivalent to $19.50 per facul- 
ty member, per year. 

Under the new terms, the 
agreement will provide 
$100,000, $200,000, and $400,000 
respectively over the three 
years for Faculty Professional 
Development such as pro- 
grams, grants and activities. 

Non-credit continuing edu- 
cation courses are offered in 
the agreement to faculty 
members who are qualified to 
teach it first, before the ad- 
ministration may offer it to a 
non-faculty member, as it is in 
the old agreement. 

"Major Medical coverage 
has a tentative increase from 
$25 - $350,000 per member, and 
maximum life insurance cov- 
erage increase from $40 - 
$50,000," said Fulmer. Final- 
ly, a proposed tuition remis- 
sion for children of deceased, 
disabled or retired faculty will 
be included in the contract 
agreements. 

Voting took place Septem- 
ber. Ballots will be counted 
Ctetober 5 by the Nominations 
and Elections Committee, and 
the decision will be dispersed 
October 6. 




AUTUMN SMILES. . .A cool fall eve- 
ning and some fun downtown at 
the Autumn Leaf Festival is all this 
boy needs to cast a warm smile on 
his face. 

Clarion Call File Photo 



The 1987 

Autumn Leaf 
Festival Parade 

on 

Main Street 

Saturday 

at noon 



Autumn Leaf Events 
Schedule 

News — Page 6 



Weekly 
Crossword Puzzle 

Features — Page 17 



Cross Country Team 
Runs Undefeated 

Sports — Page 19 



Godspeil to 
highlight ALF 

Features — Page 11 



2- THE CLARION CALL, Clarion. PA. Thursday, Oct. 1, 1987 




§IDE 



"We the people.... 

by Deborah M. Schofield 
Editor in Chief. Clarion Call 

As we observe the 200th anniversary of the signing of the U.S. 
Constitution, most of us grin as a patriotic feeling swells up inside us. 
"We the people. . . .in order to form a more perfect union. . . .promote 
the general welfare. ..." are the words that sing American praises in 
our hearts. But from whom did the Constitution arise? What wei« 
their goals? And how is the Constitution, and what it represents, re- 
flected today? 

In 1787, 39 white lawyers, prospering merchants, commercial 
operators, and plantation owners signed the Constitution. What most 
of us have been taught since grade school is that our forefathers 
signed the Constitution in order to form a more perfect union. But 
reality is a far cry from this long held myth. The framers got together 
not for the good of the people, but for the protection of the prosperity 
of the upper class. For this was the class best represented at the sign- 
ing. Deals and trade-offs were made at a time when John Fiske 
(author of 1888's "The Critical Period of American History") de- 
scribes the country as neariy bankrupt, comipt, and close to disinte- 
gration. 

At this historical event, fanners, servants, blacks, Indians, 
women, and promoters of local government and democracy were 
missing. The framers consisted of well-off, well-fed politicians. So 
how could something be written for the people when many were not 
represented? It couldn't. 

What emerged was a plan for a government which included built- 
in checks and balances, but which was unfinished and contradictory. 
Two years afterward though, the Bill of Rights was drawn up and 10 
amendments sewed up the tattered plan. And 16 times since then, 
more stitches have been added, amending the plan into the document 
we honor today. 

But don't let that refrain you from celebrating its 200th anniver- 
sary. Through all its bumpy roads and threads of corruption, the 
Constitution and its amendments give us the freedoms we boast of 
today. Free speech, free press, equality, and the security of liberty are 
freedoms taken for granted by most Americans today. Now is the 

See Life Page 3) 



(S^The Clarion Call 

VJ^ Room 1 Harvey Hal l 

Clarion University of Pennsylvania 
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all copy tor libel, taste, style and length. 

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HIDE PA 



Legitimate Fears 





Gerard B. IMcCabe 



by Gerard B. McCabe 



Fear is a natural human emotion. 
David L. Scruton, a professor in Ball 
State University's Anthropology De- 
partment describes it thusly: "If 
any human emotion is as old as our 
species it must, surely, be fear, and 
the end of its hold on us is not in 
sight." This observation appears on 
page 7 of a recent book Scruton 
edited "Sociophobics, the Anthropol- 
ogy of Fear," Boulder, CO, West- 
view Press, 1986. The anthropologist 
Scruton and some of his colleagues 
believe that Sociophobics which he 
describes as a new field, provides 

Norm's Dorm 



another point of view of human emo- 
tions as opposed to the viewpoint of 
psychologists. By contrast Wlady- 
slaw Sluckin of the University of Lei- 
cester, England offers another edit- 
ed work "Fear in Animals and 
Man," New York, Van Nostrand 
Reinhold Company, 1979, wherein a 
group of psychologists discourse on 
fear. The treatment, of course, dif- 
fers from that of the preceding book. 
Regardless of the disciplinary ap- 
proach, neither book treats of the 
kind of fear which is the subject of 
this short article. 

Some fears are legitimate and nat- 
ural, some are not. Some fears have 
been with humanity since its be- 
ginning. In Sluckin's book, P. A. 
Russell mentions a few commonly 
known to us such as fear of snakes, 
height, the dark. Today a fear per- 
vades world society, not just Amer- 
ican, but all civilized society; it is 
natural, understandable, very real. 
For a technical name, dictionaries 
give us nosophobia, the fear of dis- 
ease. For human society today that 
fear is fear of AIDS (acquired im- 
mune deficiency syndrome). Yes, 
fear of contracting AIDS, the de- 
structive disease that eliminates all 
resistance to infection, to viral at- 
tack, and so kills remorselessly, re- 
lentlessly - this is the common fear 
humans share now. Probably, hu- 
manity has not experienced a simi- 
lar feeling since the days of typhus 
and bubonic plague of the European 
Middle Ages. In America just a few 
decades ago even the terrible threat 
of Poliomyelitis did not generate this 
level of apprehension. 

This fear is legitimate; the threat 
is serious, but an irrational devel- 
opment has occurred. What has 
arisen appears to be another over- 
powering fear, namely that of do- 
nating blood. This fear has become 
so pervasive in American society 
that it has affected the blood supply. 
Americans are not donating blood in 
sufficient quantities to meet the 
needs for transfusions for people 



To w^TS. UftlTTi— Mf5{_ 





:^ 






Gee— 



who are ill, injured, or hereditary 
bearers of conditions requiring 
blood replenishing such as hemo- 
philiacs. 

What can be done to dispel this un- 
reasoned aspect of this fear? The 
American Red Cross, collector of 
about half the blood donations in the 
United States, has a serious interest 
in dispelling this aspect of the fear. 
In a very forward straight brochure, 
"AIDS: the Facts," the Red Cross 
informs readers that blood donors 
cannot C(mtract AIDS through dona- 
tion. All of the supplies used in the 
donation collecting process are not 
only sterile to begin with but dis- 
carded never to be used again. If this 
is not enough, the brochure clarifies 
the fact that people who just possibly 
might be carriers of this dreadful 
disease are discouraged from being 
donors. As a further safeguard, all 
donated blood is tested, before being 
used, for not only the AIDS virus but 
the hepatitis B virus as well. The 
Red Cross takes every precaution to 
protect the blood donor and the pa- 
tient who may be the eventual re- 
cipient of that donation. 

So, there is a legitimate, rational 
fear with an irrational side effect 
that is causing hardship and suf- 
fering for many people. This terrible 
misapprehension must be corrected 
before more serious harm occurs to 
American and world society. Blood 
donations must increase; as our na- 
tional population grows so does the 
need. These are the facts: it is safe 
to donate blood and the blood supply 
is safe. American Society must not 
let the last phrase of Scruton's quo- 
tation in the opening paragraph be- 
come a prophecy. The end of this 
fear's hold on us must be in sight! 

You are a university student, a 
well informed American, a rational 
human being ; be a blood donor if you 
can, and encourage others to donate. 
Face this irrational fear and defeat 
it. 

—Mr. G. McCabe is Director of Li- 
braries at Clarion University. 



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The Call Mailbox 



THE CLARION CALL. Clarion. PA, Thursday, Oct. 1, 1987-3 



Student protest 

Dear Readers of The Call, 

In the past two weeks, in my ca- 
pacity as a Call reporter, I have at- 
tended a lecture by an international- 
ly acclaimed artist and a concert in 
honor of Dr. Bond. At each of these 
events, I encountered other stu- 
dents, many of whom were shabbily 
dressed, inattentive, disrespectful, 
and even rude. Approaching three 
students who talked throughout the 
first half of the President's Concert, 
I discovered that my suspicions 
were correct: these individuals had 
no desire to be there, but were only 
attending because a professor of- 
fered extra credit to his students if 
they went to the concert. These three 
distracted several people at the 
concert, who wanted to be there and 
could not fully enjoy the perform- 
ances because of these students' in- 
considerate behavior. 

Please, faculty members, do not 
offer extra credit points to motivate 
students to attend activities. By all 
means encourage them to go; but if 
they only go for points, they will not 
gain anything worthwhile, and may 
only irritate others. And students, if 
you're not interested in an activity, 
please, please, stay home. Or at 
least show consideration to those 
around you: dress appropriately and 
behave with respect. 
Yours, 
Peggy Meister 

Thumbs down 

Dear Editor, 

In response to the film review in 
the Sept. 24 edition of the Clarion 
Call, I have this to share with you, as 
well as with the readers of the Call: 
What was that? The title of the ar- 
ticle was "You can't buy love," but 
nowhere within the article do the 
journalists relate this title. 

Do the reviewers feel the hero, or 
anyone for that matter, indeed, can't 
buy love? It isn't enough to just en- 



title the article "You can't buy 
love," and then assume that the 
reader will understand what is 
meant by the statement. It is the 
duty of the writer to support the title. 
I saw no evidence of support within 
the article. In fact, Ms. Karpaw 
touches on the subject, but inevit- 
ably rejects it. The last paragraph of 
this editorial demonstrates this 
claim. 

Aside from being non-influential, 
the entire plot is laid out for the 
reader in black and white, causing 
the celluloid to become obsolete, llie 
journalists stop themselves from re- 
vealing the final scene, claiming 
that this technique is evidence of a 
"good reviewer," but ultimately tell 
the reader that it "ends happily." 
Tliank you. If I had not already seen 
the fihn, I have, I need not see it now 
because with the given information 
it doesn't take a person who is a 
slave to his gray matter to figure out 
that "ending happUy," considering 
this genre of film, means "boy gets 
girl." 

I feel the entire review lacks sup- 
port of the issues that are discussed. 
In what capacity should the film 
have "been more creative," Mr. 
Tomczak? Content? Dialogue? 
What? More development was also 
needed in comparing Rash, the 
film's director, with John Hughes, 
director of several commg-of-age 
films which are better than average. 
There are, today, several directors 
who make fibns concerning a high 
school setting, and the cool-nerds 
conflict,^etc. In what other ways are 
the two directors alike? To Ms. Kar- 
paw I post this question: "Don't all 
films have a theme which permeate 
the narrative?" I believe this is 
where your ignwed title enters the 
picture. The theme of the film is in- 
corporated within the title of the 
text; is it not? After all, the hero of 
the story does realize that "you can't 
buy love." Therein lies the theme of 



Life.... 



(Continued from Page 2) 

time to recognize the freedoms we build on every day, for what began 
as a single sided document, grew into a well governing plan. 

Many may be reluctant to celebrate the Constitution's anniver- 
sary. Women, blacks, and Indians have struggled under its freedoms, 
fighting supression from its birth. But as a product of mankind, it 
should not be expected to be perfected overnight. As is true of our- 
selves, the Constitution and the government it established needed to 
grow into the document it is today. 

So celebrate the 200th anniversary of the signing of the Con- 
stitution as it lives today, but also recognize the falability, yet 
promise, of mankind as was once reflected on an important day in 
May of 1787. 



CLARION 

vs 

SLIPPERY 
ROCK 



at CUP Memorial Stadium 
Saturday, 2 p.m. 




the film that you claim, in fact, has 
no theme. 

So, in the style of Siskel and Ebert, 
which I think these reviewers were 
attempting to imitate, I give this re- 
view a whole-hearted thumt^ down. 
Sincerely, 
Brenda Durkacs 

Fair is fair 

Dear Editor: 

I really miss being able to sit out- 
side of Harvey Hall and listen to the 
WCCB speaker between classes. I've 
always been a Uttle skeptical of the 
reasons why it was shut off in the 
first place. Apparently one of those 
reasons was that the noise from the 
speaker bothered President Bond in 
the mornings. Well, this has always 
puzzled me, since WCCB didn't even 
turn on its speaker until at least 9 
a.m. I guess Dr. Bond doesn't have 
to get up before 9 a.m. like most of 
us do. 

It's been a long time since the 
speaker has been on, and you might 
wonder why I'm even bothering to 
write this letter. At the time the 
speaker was ordered turned off, I ac- 
cepted the decision because there 
was nothing I could do about it. But 
this past Sunday night I was walking 
through campus late at night when I 
heard a very loud uproar coming 
from the fenced-in area behind Dr. 
Bond's house. As I passed by the 
doorway of the fence, I saw there 
were quite a few people back there 
having themselves a good old time. 

Now, don't get me wrong. I'm glad 
Dr. Bond has this festive social life. 
But I found it quite rude of him to be 
so noisy in the middle of a college 



campus at 11:00 at night, right next 
to a dormitory no less. What's the 
point of having quiet hours in dorm 
halls if the noise from outside is loud 
enough to bother you? 

If Dr. Bond has such problems 
with a little bit of music in the 
morning when most of us have been 
up for hours, I seriously think he 
should be a little more courteous to 
us than he was on Sunday night. 
With over 2000 of us living on 
campus, I'd say we should get some 
consideration. If Dr. Bond can have 
a party without consulting us, why 
can't we hook that speaker back up 
outside of Harvey? I mean, whose 
campus is this anyway? 

Sincerely, 

Name withheld by request 

Student support 

Dear Editor, 

At long last John Kapusnik will be 
senten?ed October 5 at 9 a.m. in the 
main courtroom for his assault on a 
female college student. Needless to 
say there will be no sentence for the 
slaying of Eric Knotick since Judge 
Wiser in his arrogant wisdom pre- 
vented the case from reaching the 
jury for a proper decision. This most 
questionable decision, merely one of 
many, brought 200 local citizens to- 
gether to demonstrate and protest 
this summer. They formed Concern- 
ed Citizens for Clarion County Jus- 
tice. 

Evidently the trial date itself was 
set so that students would not be 
present at trial's end. 

At some point Judge Wiser literal- 
ly boasted that Clarion students had 
no real concern since he observed 



)*iCKf WIN. 




that not a single student appeared at 
one of the pre-trial hearings. 

I seriously doubt that charge, and 
I would expect numerous students, 
faculty, etc. to appear at Monday's 
sentence court as a protest and a 
demonstration of concern, not only 
for the Knotick tragedy, but for jus- 
tice in Clarion County. 

Inasmuch as we have had victims 
enough already, I choose not to be 
another, and ask that my name be 
withheld in this instance. 
Sincerely, 
Name withheld by request. 

Parlcing repiy 

Dear Problem Parker, 

The attitude displayed in "Park- 
ing," shows us that immaturity and 
ignorance of the law, applies not 
only to a small percentage of stu- 
dents but, also to you: ! You stated 
that you understood the problem 
but, it is obvious that you do not. If 
you did you would then know that 
Public Safety is not responsible for 
the crowded conditions of our park- 
ing lots. 

The "cute little stickers" are dis- 
played on all bumpers, for this keeps 
students from parking in employee 
designated lots. These stickers you 
say that were not on bumpers were 
still at the printers as of last week. 
Signs were posted of this all over 
campus. 

The fact that the parking problem 
left you late for work, only shows us 
that you lack in time management. 
Everyone knows the majority of 
parking slots are filled by 9: 20 a.m. 

In our experience with the staff of 
Public Safety, we have found them 
to be most friendly and cooperative 
at all times. We do not see where you 
get off saying that Public Safety 
gives "breaks" to students by con- 
tacting them instead of giving them 
a ticket. Just because you are an 
employee of this "institution" of 
higher learning, that does not give 
you any special rights or privileges, 
as far as the law is concerned. Stu- 
dents are ticketed for illegal parking 
just as all employees. It is too bad 
that you "just" work here! ! It is ob- 
vious for us to see that this is simply 
a job for you and is not a learning ex- 
perience, as it is for most employees 
of Clarion University. 

So when it comes to wising up and 
getting one's priorities in order, we 
agree that you had better find fault 
with the right agency and not Public 
Safety. 

Name withheld by request. 

EDITOR'S NOTE: Last week's 
closing Protest" was submitted on 
behalf of Panhellenic Council. 

Ideas and thoughts 
are accepted and en- 
couraged as letters to 
the editor. All contri- 
butions should he 
made to the Clarion 
Call Office, I Harvey 
Hall All letters must 
be signed, but names 
will be withheld upon^ 
request. 






"Sn^Ke^i^syiO cps 




-THE CLARJON CALL, Clarion, PA, Thursday, Oct. 1, 1987 



THE CLARION CALL, Clarion, PA, Thursday, Oct. 1. 1987-5 



Biden's cheated in past 



(CPS)-Sen. Joseph Biden 
(D-Del.) may have been em- 
barrassed by revelations that, 
as a student in 1965, he cheat- 
ed on a law school paper, but 
cheating remains widespread 
on American campuses today, 
various sources say. 

Thirty to 50 percent of all 
college students say they've 
cheated during their 
academic careers, researcher 
William Raffetto found in a 
Carnegie Commission report 
inl985. 

Duke, Indiana, Pennsyl- 
vania and Georgia univers- 
ities, among others, reported 
increases in the number of ac- 
cusations — though not neces- 
sarily offenses — from the 
1985-86 to the 1986-87 school 
years. 

At Duke, accusations of 
cheating increase when indi- 
vidual professors take steps to 
curb academic dishonesty, 
said Dean of Student Life Sue 
Wasiolek. Twenty-three 
students were charged with 
cheating during the 1986-87 
academic year, she said; 14 
were charged the previous 
year and 12 were accused of 
cheating during 1984-85. 

The increase is not due to a 
campuswide, organized 
crackdown, Wasiolek said, but 
because individual members 
have become more aware of 
the problem. 

On Sept. 17, Biden — a can- 
didate for the Democratic pre- 
sidential nomination — ad- 
mitted that he'd turned in a 
paper as a first-year law stu- 
dent at Syracuse Univeristy in 
1965 that included 5 pages 
lifted directly from a 
published law review article. 
Biden also misrepresented 




JOSEPH BIDEN Waghom 

Delaware Senator (D- Wilmington) 

his academic record during a 
recent campaign appearance, 
according to Newsweek. 
Biden reportedly said he grad- 
uated in the top half of his law 
school class, but actually fin- 
ished 76th in a class of 85. 
Biden reportedly also said he 
attended law sqhool on a full 
scholarship, but actually re- 
ceived a partial scholarship 
based on financial need, the 
magazine said. 

When caught in 1965, Biden 
convinced the law school to let 
him take the course again. 

*'I did something very 
stupid 23 years ago," Biden 
said in a Washington, D.C, 
press conference last week. 

But Biden might not have 
been allowed to retake the 
course if he was a student 
today. 



Wasiolek said an ethics re- 
view board may show mercy 
to an undergraduate for Bid- 
en's offense, but, for law 
school students, "ignorance is 
not an acceptable defense. 
Law students are expected to 
know how to footnote a re- 
search paper." 

Schools, in fact, are more 
vigilant in watching students 
these days. 

Indeed, on Aug. 31 the Uni- 
versity of Texas's Measure- 
ment and Evaluation Center 
boasted that its new practice 
of photographing students had 
helped decreased cheating on 
placement exams. 

Texas also okayed, without 
endorsing, a teaching assis- 
tant's practice of searching 
students' backpacks as they 
enter his class to take tests. 

Yale suspended 8 students 
Sept. 4 for the fall semester for 
allegedly cheating on a take- 
home physics exam last 
spring. 




by Liz Koones, 
News Editor 



So, another presidential can- 
didate has dropped out of the 
political race. First, it was Gary 
Hart, now Joe Biden, both serious 
rivals capable of attracting vot- 
ers. The only question that I can 
ask now is, "Who's next?" 

I am sure that as the next can- 
didate emerges as the Demo- 
cratic front runner, the "muck- 
rakers" will be scrambling to un- 
cover every piece of bad publicity 
that they can get on the candi- 
date. 

Who are the culprits? Maybe 
an overzealous press, threatened 
Republicans, or anyone else who 
jumps on the bandwagon. It's 
probably a combination of them 
all. What started out as the 
search for a candidate with in- 
tegrity and a strong political 
platform has turned this cam- 
paign into a three-ring circus. It 



irritates me to hear how a can- 
didate's entire private life be- 
comes public knowledge and how 
small failure from years past are 
blown out of proportion, making a 
candidate's character and rep- 
utation questionable. 

There must be a limit to what 
the public can know about the 
candidates' private lives. I don't 
think you can find anyone who 
doesn't have a few skeletons in 
his or her closet, skeletons that 
are better left alone. Somewhere 
along the campaign trail though, 
the ability to forgive and forget 
has been lost. These people are 
not gods, they are human beings 
who make mistakes, just like the 
rest of us. 

Everyone involved must 
realize there will never be a 
perfect candidate. Hopefully, 
now that the damage has been 
done, they will leave well enough 
alone and get back to the real 
campaign issues. 



ISHIRE'S 

ftavnta & qhfts 

226^7070 90 Merle St. 






RACK 'EM UP — Autumn Leaf Festival doesn't draw everyone downtown. These students opted to shoot some pool In 

Photo by Frank Lotito, Staff Photographer 





CUP 

BLOOD 
DRIVE 

Wed., Oct. 7 
11 a.m.-5p.m. 

*TlppinGym* 

Domino's will support 

the campaign by 

providing 

pizza. 




NEWS 




Prospective students visit CUP 



by Lisa Hampe, 
News Staff Writer 



Clarion University hosted 
an open house for high school 
seniors and their families. Ap- 
proximately 230 families at- 
tended the Sept. 26th event. 

The open house began with 
an informal question and an- 
swer period between the 



seniors, their families and fac- 
ulty. Tables containing curri- 
cular information were set up 
outside the Marwick-Boyd 
Auditorium. This gave the 
seniors a chance to meet some 
of the faculty members. Next 
the seniors and their families 
were ushered into the audi- 
torium for a general infor- 
mation period. 



Mr. John Shropshire, Dean 
of Enrollment, gave the wel- 
coming address. He touched 
on several perspectives such 
as the quality, the environ- 
ment, and the administration 
at CUP. 

The key note speaker for the 
occasion was Dr. William 
Lloyd. He touched on many 
subjects which were benefic- 




COLLEGE PREVIEW. . .A group of high school students pay close attention to their campus tour guide at the Higti 
School Open House. Photo by Chris Horner, Staff Photographer 

Economy club returns to campus 



by Steve Ferringer, 
News Staff Writer 



Tlie Political Economy Club, 
formerly the Social Economics 
Association, has recently been 
reorganized. The club is being 
regrouped after a two -year 
ateence from CUP. 

The group is for anyone who 
is interested in political sci- 
ence, economics and current 
events as they relate to each 
other. President of the Politi- 
cal Economy Club, Scott 
Schul, said, "The word econ- 



omics is scary. We're not out 
to lecture, we want to present 
a lot of different views.^' To do 
this the club plans to have 
Representative David Wright, 
Dr. William Sanders of CUP 
and Congressman Klinger all 
speak to the group this semes- 
ter. 

Schul hopes to make the or- 
ganization "a lot more inter- 
esting" than in the past. He 
feels the organization dis- 
appeared due to "lack of 
quality leadership and too 
narrow a focus." He also 



stresses that the group wants 
to become firmly established 
and also hopes to visit the 
United Nations next semester. 

The Political Economy 
Qub's goal is to get people in- 
terested in what's going on 
around them, on a political 
and social level. Schul added 
that they "would like to get 
people to stand for something, 
believe in something." 

The Political Economy Club 
will hold their first meeting of 
the semester tonight at 7 p.m. 
in 108 Still Hall. 



Univ. cracks down on racism 



(CPS)— The University of 
Massachussetts continued its 
crackdown on whites who 
foster racial tensions on the 
campus Sept. 18 when it sus- 
pended a white student who 
broke the windshield of a 
black student's car. 

The student, whose name 
was not released, was sus- 
pended for a year. 

The suspension grew out of 
a May 14, 1987, incident at 
which Theta Chi fraternity 
members reportedly shouted 
racial slurs at 3 bladk students 



as they walked to their cars, 
and then threw a rock through 
the windshield. 

Theta Chi members said 
they were retaliating because 
one of the black students had 
urinated on one of their cars, 
but the black students denied 
the charge. 

By May, racial tensions at 
the UMass campus were run- 
ning high, due to an Oct., 1986, 
brawl in which 5 white stu- 
dents beat up a black class- 
mate. 

In Mid-September, UMass 



officials disciplined some of 
the white stuoents involved in 
last fall's incident, making 
them take "sensitivity" 
courses. 

Many other campuses — 
including Tufts, Pennsylvan- 
ia, The Citadel, Maryland, 
UCLA and Michigan — suf- 
fered confrontations between 
black and white students 
during the 1986-87 school year, 
and virtuaUy all issued state- 
ments during the summer 
promising to install some kind 
of palliative measures for 
1987-88. 



ial to the students. 

Student input was given by 
Terri McDonald and Willie 
Williams. Terri addressed the 
honors program and Willie 
discussed resident life. 

After the information 
period, the seniors and their 
families were given one hour 
campus tours. The tours were 
led by CUP students who vol- 
unteered their time. 

After the tour, the Admis- 
sions staff was available in 
Riemer Center to answer any 
questions the seniors and their 



families had. 

Sue McMillan, a member of 
the Admissions staff, was 
very pleased with the open 
house. "Having an open house 
gives us a chance to get pros- 
pective students onto CUP's 
beautiful campus to show 
them what Clarion has to 
offer." 

The admissions staff would 
like to thank all the students 
and the faculty who volun- 
teered their time. Another 
open house will be held Octo- 
ber 24. 



Musical, comedy 
talents showcased 



by Andrea Yuhasz, 
News Staff Writer 



Several campus organiza- 
tions are looking into ways to 
better showcase the talents of 
Clarion University students 
and individuals from sur- 
rounding communities. 

Interhall Council is planning 
to have student bands provide 
music at dances. This will 
give student bands exposure 
and also provide entertain- 
ment for ttie students. Inter- 
hall believes there are enough 
student bands on campus to 
generate participation. Cur- 
rently, the dances are slated 
for every other Thursday. 

Center Board also has a 
creative idea on how to give 
Qarion students and individ- 
uals from the community, a 
diance to show their talent. 
Center Board is looking for 
people who have a sense of 
humor to entertain at a night 
club style comedian show on 



Friday nights. This type of 
show would provide an alter- 
native to the usual bar/party 
scene. 

In addition to the above ef- 
forts, Jim Tometsko, Camp- 
bell Hall Resident Director, is 
organizing a "talent agency" 
on campus. Tometsko plans to 
have a pool of performers 
from on campus, such as : solo 
musical performers, instru- 
mental performances, people 
who write dramas, skits, 
poems, original videos, and 
photography. 

According to Tometko, 
there is a lot of talent at 
Clarion's campus that does 
not get exposure except in a 
classroom environment. This 
type of an agency would allow 
talent to be shared with the 
university as a whole. If 
students have a talent that 
they would like to share, they 
may pick up an application at 
Campbell Hall's front desk, or 
contact Jim Tometsko. 



CAMPUS CALENDAR 

ACADEMIC AND INFORMATIONAL 

Oct. 1: Sign up for Senior yearbook pictures (near 126 Riemer) 
Oct. 2: Credit/No record ends, 4 p.m. 

Sign up for Senior yearbook pictures taken (126 Riemer) 
Oct. 5: Senior yearbook pictures taken (126 Riemer) 

Policy Committee meeting, 140 Peirce, 4 p.m. 
Oct. 6: Senioryearbook pictures taken (126 Riemer) 

"Share the Word" scripture study, 140 Peirce, 4-5 p.m. 

Job Search Series seminar "Inside Washington," 109 Still, 7 pm 
Oct. 7: Senior yearbook pictures taken (126 Riemer) 

Bloodmobile, Tippin Gymnasium, 11 a.m. ■ 5 p.m. 

Faith and Learning Series "Church Chat: The Catholic Church ■ 
Who are we?", 140 Peirce, 4-5 p.m. 

Weekly Juma Meeting, Campbell basement, room 40, 1 p.m. 

ENTERTAINMENT 
Oct. 1: ROTO Awards Ceremony, 4 p.m. 
Oct. 2: Planetarium Show, 8 p.m. 

Autumn Leaf theatre performance, Mar-Boyd Little Theatre, 8:15 
Oct. 3: Homecoming Day 

CAB'S (outside or Harvey Multi-Purpose Room), 9:30 p.m. 

Homecoming Cabaret, Mar.-Boyd Little Theatre, sponsored by 
Black student Union 
Oct. 4: ALF Autorama 
Oct. 5: WCCB Big Chill Contest 



\ 



6— THE CLARION CALL, Clarion, PA, Thursday, Oct. 1, 1987 



Student Affairs 



Hearings slated to discuss problems 



by Ron George 
News Staff Writer 



The Student Affairs Com- 
mittee will hold an open 
hearing sometime this fafi to 
discuss problems with 
Drop/ Add, the withdrawal 
period, and Monday registra- 
tion, according to Dr. Ains- 
worth's report to the Faculty 
Senate on September 28. 

Dr. Ainsworth, Chariman 
of the Student Affairs Com- 
mittee, expressed a desire to 
hear suggestions concerning 
these topics. He noted, how- 



ever, that change will not 
necessarily be a part of this 
hearing. 

The Faculty Senate also 
heard a report from Janice 
Horn, Carlson Library staff 
member, concerning the li- 
brary's planned computer 
system. Horn reported that 
there has been a delay in the 
arrival and installation of the 
new equipment. According to 
Horn, the library will con- 
tinue to prepare for the 
changes by improving the 
data base and 'Tbar coding" 
books. According to Presi- 



dent Bond, the delay is most 
likely to have resulted from 
the university's lack of neces- 
sary funds. 

Dr. Joslyn reported on the 
current state ot the Honor's 
Program. According to Jos- 
lyn, there are 30 in-coming 
freshmen enrolled in the Hon- 
or's Program. She also said 
that the average SAT score of 
this class is up 18 points from 
last semester. 

Several senators discussed 
the procedure for the intro- 
duction of upper-level honors 
courses. Dr. Baldwin ques- 



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tioned the legitimacy of of- 
fering such courses without 
approval from the Committee 
on Courses and Programs of 
Study (COPS). CurrenUy, hon- 
ors courses are entered under 
the catalog number of special 
topics courses, but they are 
not sent to CCPS for recogni- 
tion. This controversy was dis- 
cussed at length. 

Also, concerning the Honors 
Program, Joslyn reported 
jhatthe program has retained 



roughly 50 percent of last 
year's memfcKers. The lack of 
honors courses offered on the 
Venango campus was also ad- 
dressed. 

In other business, Dr. Gir- 
van. Chairman of CCPS, re- 
ported that the psychology de- 
partment has propped a spe- 
cial topics course to CCPS. 
The course will be Psychology 
360, Introduction to Exist- 
ential Phenomenalogical Psy- 
chology, according to Girvan. 




Autumn Leaf 
events schedule 

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 1 

22nd Annual Forest Area Craft Show, Holiday Inn, 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. 
Health Fair, Klingensmith's Drug Store, 10 a.m. to 9 p.m. 
Sportsmen's Days displays and nature crafts, Clarion Mall, 10 a.m. to 9 p.m. 
Clarion Area Model Railroad Club Exhibit, Clarion Mall, 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. 
Kids' Parade, Main St. from 6th Ave. to IC Parish, 6:30 p.m. 

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 2 

Farmers and Crafts Day, Downtown Clarion, 7:30 a.m. to dusk 

Petting Zoo, Courthouse Lawn, all day 

Flea Market, two blocks north of East Main St. on Airport Rd., begins 6 a.m. 

22nd Annual Forest Area Craft Show, see listing under Oct. 1. 

Sportsmen's Days displays and nature crafts, see listing under Oct. 1 

ALF Tennis Tournament, CUP Tennis Courts, 2 p.m. 

Clarion Area Model Railroad Club Exhibit, Clarion Mall, 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. 

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 3 

Autumn Leaf Festival Parade, Main St., noon 

CUP Homecoming Football Game, CUP Memorial Stadium, 2 p.m. 

ALF Tennis Tournament, see listing under Oct. 2 

Sausage Breakfast, Meisinger Center, 8 to 1 1 :30 a.m. 

Sportsmen's Days displays and nature crafts, see listing under Oct. 1. 

AMA District 5 Motorcycle Tour, Information - 226-5405 or 782-3408. 

Clarion Area Model Railroad Club Exhibit, Clarion Mail, 1 to 5 p.m. and 6 to 9 p.m 

Flea Market, see listing for Oct. 2 

Chicken Barbecue on Courthouse lawn, lunch through supper 

ALF Dance, 9 p.m. to 1:30 a.m.. Information, 226-6180 or 226-4742. 

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 4 

Autorama, Main St. from 5th to 8th Avenues, 9 a.m. 

ALF Tennis Tournament, see listing under Oct. 2 

Chicken Barbecue, see listing for Oct. 3. 

Clarion Area Model Railroad Club Exhibit, Clarion Mall, 1 to 5 p.m. 

Motorcycle Antique Dresser and Street Show, Clarion Mail, noon to 5 p.m. 

Flea Market, see listing under Oct. 2. 

Speakers slated for Russian Club 

terested students and faculty 
are cordially invited to either 
event. 

Parking lots reserved 

Parking Lots G, H, I, J, K 
are reserved for the ALF Pa- 
rade from 12 a.m. Friday, Oct. 
2 to 5 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 3. 
Cars parking in these lots dur- 
ing this time will be towed 
away at owner's expense. 

It is suggested vehicles nor- 
mally using these lots be park- 
ed in lot "B" by CampbeU. 



The Russian Qub will be 
sponsoring a guest speaker on 
October 7, in Founders Hall, 
Room 110, at 7 p.m. Mr. Rich- 
ard Schall will speak and pre- 
sent slides of churches inside 
the Soviet Union. 

On October 21 at 7 p.m., 
LTC Ronald Faulkner will 
speak on the subject of dis- 
armament, pertaining to the 
relationship between the U.S. 
and the Soviet Union. Ethnic 
snacks will be served. All in- 



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News Staff Writer 



THE C LARION CALL, Clarion, PA, Thursday, Oct. 1, 1987—7 

Gala^concert pays 
tribute to Bond 

coordinated the concert, and 
explained, "It is an opportun- 
ity for the music faculty to 
perform at a single concert 
and honor Dr. Thomas Bond, 
as well as a way to share the 
artistry of the teaching faculty 
with the general public." 

The department-sponsored 
concert is traditionally free 
and open to the public, and 
this year so many people at- 
tended that there were not 
enough programs to go 
around. 

Such noted Clarion musi- 
cians as Dr. Annette Roussel- 
Pesche, a CUP Professor 
emeritus, and Milutin Lazich, 
director of the University Con- 
cert Choir, performed. 



The 7th annual Faculty 
Gala Concert for the Presi- 
dent was held Sunday eve- 
ning, Sept. 27, in Marwick- 
Boyd Auditorium. This yearly 
event provides faculty mem- 
bers, students, and alumnae, 
as well as guest artists, the op- 
portunity to play tribute to 
University President Thomas 
Bond. 

The concert, which featured 
music for voice, brass, piano, 
woodwinds and strings, in- 
cluded two compositions by 
American composers, one a 
Pennsylvania native. 

Dr. Donald Black, the chair- 
man of the Music Department, 



MUSICAL TRUBUTE. . . .A group of musicians serenaded the audience at the highly attended Faculty Gala Concert. 

Photo by Steve Cutri, Staff Photographer 



Writing submissions sought 



The Clarion University of P^^}^^}^^ « i^,^ English 



Pennsylvania Office of In 
ternational Programs is 
seeking submissions for the 
second edition of "Collages & 
Bricolages: The Journal of 
International Writing." 



translation. Essays should 
follow the new M.L.A. 
format. 

Each submission must 
have a detachable cover 
page which indicates the 
author's name, address. 
The journal, intended as a phone number, and title of 
vehicle for the dissemination the submission. The actual 
of writings which are inter- submission should be identi- 
national, proposes to include fied by title only, 
essays about polities and cul- A brief biographical note 
ture ; poems, plays and short about the author should be in- 
stories in foreign languages ; serted along with the submis- 
avante-grade and theoretical sion. There is no limit to the 
writings which explore the number of submissions by one 
connection between art and author and none of the sub- 
culture, and reviews of missions will be returned 



Marie Fortis, Editor, 212 
Founders HaU, CUP, Clarion, 
PA 16214, phone 814-226-1934, 
by Thursday, Oct. 15. Any sub- 
missions received after that 
date will be considered for 
publication in subsequent edi- 
tions. Copies or "Collages & 
Bricolages" are available at 
$3 per copy at the same ad- 
dress. 



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Sun. 12-5 



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"Collages & Bricolages" is 
intended as a forum for ideas 
about literature and culture, 
it welcomes submissions in 
all languages by writers of 
all nationalities. Require- 
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All submissions must be 
typed, double spaced. Sub- 
missions in languages other 
than English may be hand- 
written but must be accom- 



Submissions should be de- 
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Call-Ins 
Welcome 



8— THE CLARION CALL, Clarion. PA. Thursday. Oct. 1. 1987 



Student liaison resigns as education link 



1 



(CPS)-Student Richard 
Mimisteri resigned as the U.S. 
Department of Education's 
link to the Americn student 
body Sept. 4 because, he said, 
the staff treated him and his 
post with arrogance and dis- 
respect. 

Munisteri, who took the job 
Student Liaison Officer (SLO) 
Aug. 3, cited "a number of 
reasons, both personal and 
professional," for leaving the 
job. 

"The reason I left is not be- 
cause I was totally in disa- 
greement with the staff and 
the way they treat the posi- 
tion," Munisteri, a University 
of Texas student, said. But he 
resented being used as a 
"mouthpiece" and "puppet" 
for the department. 

The federal government 
created the student liaison of- 
fice during the mid-1970s to 
give the students and student 
groups a channel of communi- 
cation to pohcymakers. Some 
groups — most notably the 



U.S. Student Association 
(USSA), the Washington, 
D.C.-based group of student 
politicians from around the 
country — have criticized the 
Reagan administration for 
"politicizing" the position. 

"They want a student to be 
there to give the impression 
that there's student input into 
the department," Munisteri 
said. "But they don't want you 
to do anything." 

"I won't lie," sad Munisteri. 
"The job is supposed to be a 
channel to education officials, 
to give input to the depart- 
ment. It doesn't exist. It's 
BS." 

"It's unfortunate Richard 
resigned," said USSA Presi- 
dent Circe Pajunen. "We were 
looking forward to working 
withhun." 

"We feel the SLO's role is 
communicating policy, not 
making policy" department 
spokeswoman Victoria Tripp 
said of Munisteri's claims. 
"Richard is a young man with 




a lot of ambition. We liked 
him, and we're sorry to see 
him go. But right now, he's not 
ready to become the Secre- 
tary of Education." 

The former state chairman 
of the Young Conservatives of 
Texas, Munisteri has "the 
greatest respect for Secretary 
(William) Bennett and his 
policies." But the depart- 
ment's mid-level bureacrats 
"don't like some newcomer 
coming to Washington with no 
gray hair trying to get things 
done." 

Past student liaison officers 
were free to speak and corre- 
spond to whom they wished, 
Munisteri said, but the depart- 
ment staff rifled through his 
calendar and computer disk to 
check up on him. 

The staff also told him what 
to write in his newsletter and 
"edited it with a hatchet. " 

"I would have loved to have 
spent 6 months up there and 
reinvigorate the position. But 
there are people who have 



been up there for 6 years. 
Those vulture staff members 
would have just torn down all 
that I built up," Ministeri ex- 
plained. 

"As a conservative, I was 
appalled. There was no re- 
ceptiveness to students by the 
staff, "he said. 

Munisteri had hoped to ad- 
dress campus civil rights 
issues, easier access for hand- 
icapped students and other 
concerns, but was told to "just 
focus on financial aid," he 
said. 

"Students have a lot at 
stake in more issues than 
financial aid," Pajunen noted. 
"It's unfortunate that the de- 
finition of the job has been 
narrowed to dealing with 
financial aid." 

The student liaison officer's 
job description has not been 
altered since 1981, Tripp said. 
"It's primany mission has al- 
ways been to be a liaison. ' ' 

Munisteri recommended 
"recreating" the job to assign 



clerical work to interns and in- 
clude more access to the Sec- 
retary of Education. "What's 
the use of saying I have access 
to the secretary when I have 
to be cannonized to get an 
autographed picture?" Munis- 
teri asked. 

Student and high education 
groups were consulted in past 
years before a student liaison 
officer was selected, but now 
the department appoints 
someone without input from 
others. Munisteri said the sel- 
ection process should again in- 
clude those organizations. 

"Students need to be re- 
spected as adults," Pajunen 
agreed. "We need some say in 
the decisions that affect us. 
The department is not paying 
as much attention or respect 
to students as it should. We've 
lost some of the respect we de- 
serve." 



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Assoc, sponsors 
church series 

C.U.P. Catholic campus 
ministers and Newman As- 
sociation chaplins Sr. Lisa 
Paffrath and Fr. Monty Say- 
ers wiH be leading a six week 
series on the Catholic faith 
entitled CHURCH CHAT: 
THE CATHOLIC CHURCH. 
WHO ARE WE? These 
Church Chats will begin next 
Wednesday, Oct. 7 and con- 
tinue thru November U. The 
meeting place is 140 Peirce 
from 4 until 5 p.m. 

Church Chat is part of what 
the ministry team hopes will 
become an ongoing Faith and 
Learning series addressing a 
new topic of interest to stu- 
dents, faculty and staff each 
semester 

CHURCH CHAT is designed 
for the person who may be 
dating or engaged to a Catho- 
lic, a baptized Catholic who 
has not been part of a parish 
faith community, or the Cath- 
olic student who is interested 
in learning more about their 
faith. A special invitation is 
extended to people of other de- 
nominations curious about 
Catholicism. 

The topics that will be cov- 
ered during the Wednesday 
afternoon sessions include: 
TTie Church. . .A People of God 
. . .A People of Worship. . . .A 
People of Sacraments. . .A 
People of Life. . .A People on 
the Way. 

There is no fee for these ses- 
sions and a comp^limentary 
booklet highlighting each 
topic will be given to each par- 
ticipant. For more informa- 
tion call Sr. Lisa at 226-6651 or 
Fr. Monty at 226-6869. 

FACULTY & STAFF 

Do you have an idea for a compu- 
ter-based project that you would like 
to have done for you? Selected pro- 
jects will be completed during the 
Spring '88 semester. Contact S. 
Traynor at MIO or 2442. 




THE CLARION CALL, Clarion, PA. Thursday, Oct. 1. 1987-9 

Homecoming Queen 
candidates announced 



Eleven Clarion University 
of Pennsylvania students, se- 
lected by a student vote, will 
serve as members of the 1987 
homecoming court. One of the 
three seniors in the final group 
will be named homecoming 
queen at a student dance, 
Thursday, Oct. 1. 

The queen and her court will 
ride in the homecoming par- 
ade on Saturday, Oct. 3, with 
the queen to be officially 
crowned during halftime cer- 
emonies of the CUP-Slippery 
Rock football game. Eighty- 
three students were on the or- 
iginal ballot. The eleven final- 
ists are: Vicky Amsdell, a 
senior business administration 
/industrial relations major; 



Michelle Brady, a senior com- 
munications major; Cathy 
Shanahan, a senior account- 
ing major; Leah Audia, a jun- 
ior finance major; Nancy 
Hovanec, a junior business ad- 
ministration/marketing ma- 
jor; Jeanna Whitling, a sopho- 
more business administra- 
tion/office management 
major, Kitty Neal, a sopho- 
more elementarv education 
major; India Barker, a sopho- 
more business management 
major; Dana Takach, a fresh- 
man communications major; 
Janey Slagle, a freshman 
nursing major; Dena Moran, 
a freshman elementary edu- 
cation/early childhood educa- 
tion major. 



HOMECOMING QUEEN CANDIDATES. . .The 1987 Clarion University homecoming court are front, from left: Leah Audia, 
Kitty Neal, India Barker, Janey Slagle, and Vicky Amsdell. Second row from left: Michelle Brady, Cathy Shanahan, Nancy 
Hovanee, Dena Moran, Dana Takach, and Jean Whitling. 

AIDS brochure distributed in U.S. 



Little sisters 
removal questioned 



by Suzanne Halleman. 
News Staff Writer 



The federal government 
has begun to distribute 45 mil- 
lion copies of a new brochure 
on the deadly AIDS virus. The 
eight-page pamphlet, pre- 
pared by the Centers for Dis- 
ease Control, will be distribut- 
ed through local health agen- 
cies, community groups and 
large businesses. Confess is 
pressing the Reagan Admin- 
istration to mail the booklet to 
everyone in the U.S. Health 
and Human Services spokes- 
man Campbell Gardett said 
that the plan is still being con- 
sidered. 

Bork Hearings 

The Senate Judiciary Com- 
mittee resumed its confirma- 
tion of hearings of Supreme 
Court nomineee Robert Bork. 
Witnesses included Carter Ad- 



FROM 

ALL 

POINTS 




Compiled by Vonda Swarts 

News Staff Writer 

ministration Attorney General 
Griffin BeU and Betty Riggs, a 
woman, who in an appellate 
decision upheld by Bork, was 
given the choice of sterlization 



Planetarium presents Autumn Skies 



Dr. William Suggs, director 
of the Peirce Science Center 
planetarium at Qarion Uni- 
versity of Pennsylvania, has 
announced four planetarium 
presentations during CUP's 
homecoming weekend. 

The presentation "Autunm 
Skies" will show the skies 
above Clarion as they appear 
in the fall. "We will also look 
at the constellations, planets 
and deep sky objects," said 
Suggs. 



The shows, free and open to 
the public, are scheduled Fri- 
day and Saturday, Oct. 2 and 3 
at 8 p.m., and Sunday, Oct. 4 
at 3 p.m. and 4 p.m. Reserva- 
tions should be made in ad- 
vance by calling 814-226-188L 

SENIOR ACCOUNTING 
MAJORS 

Full-time and part-time intern- 
ships are available for Fall '87. 
Please stop in 334 Still Hall a.s.a.p. 
Minimum QPA of 3.0 in the major 
and overall. 



or job dir issal. The West 
Virginia plant where she 
worked produced high levels 
of lead, which posed a threat 
to fetuses. Riggs said, in a 
telegram sent to the hearings, 
that the ruling, and her deci- 
sion to become sterilized, was 
the most awful thing that hap- 
pened to her. 

Hosts Left 

Pope John Paul H is back in 
Rome, but several hosts are 
struggling to pay bills left 
from his visit. New Orleans 
fund-raisers have $1 million on 
hand and $750,000 in pledges to 
help clear up their $2.4 million 
debt. The Archdiocese of San 
Francisco, which had one of 
the highest costs of the riine- 
city tour, has raised $2.1 mil- 
lion of their $3.3 million debt. 
To wipe out the shortfall, they 
plan to sell yards of the silver 
outdoor carpet and other 
items used in the mass. 





At the Student Senate 
meeting Tuesday ni^t. Sen- 
ator Kim Acquaro questioned 
Dr. Curtis about the removal 
of little sisters from the fra- 
ternities. He said, "the Fed- 
eral law makes it illegal to dis- 
criminate on the basis of sex, 
race. . .Under the title IX law 
that deals with education." 
The little sisters are not really 
within the fraternity so they 
are discriminating on the 
basis of sex being that only 
women can belong to little sis- 
ters and the legislation says 
you can't discriminate, so 
they have to be dropped. 

If there would be any type of 
law suit it is the institution 
that would suffer. If this would 
happen the university may 
lose its ability to handle Fi- 
nancial Aid and the school 
can't take that chance be- 
cause many students depend 
on financial aid. 

Discussed under the Elec- 
tions Committee were the pro- 
posed amendments for the re- 



quirements of Student Sena- 
tors. Article V, section 2 will 
tentatively state that active 
members with full voting priv- 
ileges shall be: sixteen Sena- 
tors with 32 or more credits 
who meet the prerequisites for 
office listed by Article IX, and 
four senators with 31 or less 
credits who meet the prereq- 
uisites for office listed by Ar- 
ticle IX. 

Article IX, section 2, states 
that all Student Senators must 
have a 2.20 or better cumula- 
tive grade point average upon 
taking the office. 

A cumulative grade point 
average of 2.20 must be main- 
tained throughout their entire 
term of office. 

A vote will be called on the 
tentative amendments 
October 13. It must be approv- 
ed by two-thirds of the senate 
to be placed on the Student 
Senate elections ballot. 

The committee on commit- 
tees reported that not many 
applications for student 
senate have been turned in. 
The deadline is October 5. 




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10-THE CLARION CALL, Clarion. PA. Thursday. Oct. 1. 1987 



THE CLARION CALL, Clarion, PA, Thursday, Oct. 1, 1987-1 1 



Loan default rate rises 



(CPS)— Despite an aggres- 
sive campaign to track aown 
people who aren't repaying 
their student loans, the federal 
government will have to pay 
off $1.5 billion worth of de- 
faulted Guaranteed Student 
Loans during the 1988 fiscal 
year, the Office of 
Management and Budget 
estimated August 27. 

The amount represents a 25 
percent increase over the cur- 
rent fiscal year, which ends 
Sept. 30. 

The payoffs ~ made to the 
banks that actually lent the 
money to the students — typi- 
cally happen when the banks 
are unable to collect the 
money. 

U.S. Dept. of Education offi- 



cials note the $1.5 billion 
they're paying off in bad loans 
consumes more than half its 
$2.8 billion loan program bud- 
get. 

The problem, said depart- 
ment spokeswoman Victoria 
Tripp, is that defaulters think 
"the federal government is an 
easy touch." 

But Mary Preston of the 
United States Student 
Associasaid "that's a pretty 
simple analysis." 

Economic hardships, poor 
student financial counseling 
and rigid loan procedures 
force some borrowers to 
default on their student loans, 
Preston said. 

"There are definitely 
abuses, but a lot of people are 



having a lot of trouble paying 
back loans," Preston said. 
"The government need to 
work with them." 

"We've tried in every way 
we can, ' ' Tripp replied. 

The government, she said, 
recently instituted an income- 
contingent program that reor- 
ganizes loan payments based 
on a borrower's income. 
Borrowers with certain low- 
paying careers, such as 
teachers in poor regions, will 
have their debts "forgiven" if 
they qualify. 

The program, however, 
currently is only in a pilot 
stage, and prospective pro- 
blems with it kept the vast 
majority of campuses from 
applying to join the pilot pro- 
gram. 



Slightly Off Campus 



University of Texas officials 
found out Aug 20 they'd 
named a campus building 
after the wrong person. 

Last year, they named a 
building after John Hargis, 
who in January, 1959, became 
the first black person to get a 
UT degree. 

But a few weeks ago they 
heard from Edna Humphries 
Rhambo, a black woman who 



reminded administrators her 
UT degrre is dated August, 
1958. 

Officials note student records 
in Uie late dOs did not include 
race information, and now be- 
lieve there may be other black 
Texas grads predating 
Rhambo. 

However, they'll keep the 
building named for Hargis, 
who until his death in Novem- 



ber, 1986, was an assistant to 
UT President William Cun- 
ningham. 

Things to do in Long Beach, 
Mississippi: On August 1, the 
University of Southern Missi- 
ssippi celebrated the 500th 
birthday of a campus tree, 
once memorialized, according 
to a USM press kit, in picture 
in a 1950 issue of Life maga- 
zine. 




^ 



ALF DANCE 

HOMECOMING QUEEN 
ANNOUNCED 

Sponsored by 

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TONIGHT 

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IN HARVEY HALL 





CHANDLER MENU 

THURSDAY, OCT. 1 
LUNCH: Split Pea Soup with Ham Chunks, Scotch Barley Soup, Bacon, Lettuce A Tomato on 
Toast, Skrny Joe on Bun, Potato Chips, Green Bean Succotash. 

DINNER: SpUt Pea Soup with Ham Chunks, Scotch Barley Soim, Sallsburv »eak, Baked Bar-B- 
Q Pork CSiops, Chopped Broccoli, Mashed Potatoes with Gravy, Sauteed Cabbage with Bacon. 

FRIDAY, OCT. 2 
BREAKFAST: Stewed Prunes, Pried Eggs (Sunnyside or Over), Cinnamon Rolls, Oatmeal, 
Home Fried Potatoes, Banana, Creamed CMpped Beef on Muffln. 

LUNCH: Cream of Tomato Soup, Clam Biaqiie, Grilled Cheese Sandwich, Creamed Chicken ova- 
Biscuit, Potato Chips, French Fried Cauliflowei . 

DINNER: Cream of Tomato Soup, Clam Bisque, Fried Ham Sandwiches, Fish Sandwich on Bim, 
Tacoe, Baked Potatoes, Hot Cheese Sauce, Tacos, Cheese A Broccoli Sauce. 

SATURDAY, OCT. 3 

BREAKFAST: Scrambled Eggs, Oatmeal, Bacon. Hash Brown Potatoes, Pancakes with Syrup, 

Raspberry Coffee Ring. 

LUNCH: Homemade Navy Bean Soup, Beef Vegetable Soup, Cheese Omelette, Pizza with 

Pepperoni, Fried Potatoes, Green Beans. 

DINNER: Homemade Navy Bean Soup, Beef Vegetable Soup, Roast Pork, Beefaroni, Buttered 

Carrots, Creamed Spinach, Macaroni, Whipped Potatoes with Gravy. 

SUNDAY. OCT. 4 
BRUNCH: Pink Grapefruit, Scrambled Eggs, Bacon, Warm Sticky Buns, Desert Peaches, 
Chicken Chow Mein over Steamed Rice with Chow Mdn Noodles, Hash Brown Potatoes, Banana, 
Bluebory Hot Cakes with Syrup, Sausage Patty, Oatmeal. 

DINNER: French Onion Soup, Navy Bean Soup, Sm(d(ed Ham, Braised Sirloin Tips, Butto-ed 
Frozen Pns, Buttered Noodles, Yellow Squash. 

MONDAY, OCT. 5 
BREAKFAST: Scrambled Eggs, dacon, annamon Rolls, Hash Brown Potatoes, Raisin Muffins, 
French Toast with Syrup, Grilled Ham, Cream of Wheat. 

LUNCH: Homemade Be^ with Macaroni So(q>, Cream of Celery Soup, Hoagie, Fried Egg Sand- 
wich, Com Chips, Boston Baked Beans. 

DINNER : Hunemade Beef with Macaroni Soup, Cream of Celery Soup, Roast of Beef with Gravy, 
Turkey Croquette with Cream of Mushroom Sauce, Oven Browned Potatoes, Brussel Sprouts, 
Mixed Vegetables 

TUESDAY, OCT. 8 
BREAKFAST: Banana, Cheese and Ham Omelette, Hoi Oatmeal, Hard Boiled Eggs, Home Fried 
Potatoes, Cinnamon Rolls, Chilled Pur[de Plums, Bhiebory Hot Cakes with Syrup, Jelly R(^. 
LUNCH : Homemade Cream of Chicken Soup, Sjikt Pea S019, Swedish Meat Balls, Fish and Chips, 
Cottage Fries, Stewed Tomatoes, Buttered Rice, Butter Asparagus Pieces. 

WEDNESDAY, OCT. 7 
BREAKFAST: Fried Eggs, Bacon, Cinnammi Rolls, Hash Brown Potatoes, Hot Waffles with 
Synq), Cream of Wheat, English Muffins. 

LUNCH: Cream of Tomato Soup, Chicken Broth, Grilled Ham and Cheese Sandwich, Chicken ala 
Kii% in Patty Shell, Cheese Curls, Baked Apples. 

DINNER: C^«am of Tomato Soup, Chicken Broth, Grilled Pork Chops, Cheese Ravioli, Green 
Beans Amondine, Tater Gems, Harvard Beets. 



Artist to lecture 
in Riemer Center 



By Jennifer A. John 
Features Staff Writer 



Bob LaBobgah could be 
considered the usual stero- 
typical artist, with his color- 
ful, bizarre clothing, but his 
works and personality are 
very much original. Mr. 
Labobgah is a printer, sculp- 
tor, photographer, and 
expert bronze caster. Cur- 
rently, he is working with 
mixed media photography, 
which is a technique using 
both photographs and 
drawings. 

He is a Canadian citizen, 
who resided in Clarion Coun- 
ty for several years, but now 
has set up his studio in Pitts- 
burgh. While living in the 
Clarion area, he contributed 
much to the community. La- 
Bobgah has done art work for 



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both the American Legion 
and Crooks Department 
Store. He also designed and 
created all of the beautifully 
intricate ceramic tile stations 
of the cross in the Immaculate 
Conception Catholic Oiurch. 
Last year he made the gener- 
out contribution of creating 
and giving The Good Samari- 
tan Medals to the families of 
Eric Knotick and Bill Marsh. 

Along with many of his 
other credits, Mr. LaBobgah 
has performed several times 
in the Clarion Spring Arts 
Festival and has also dis- 
played works in the Three 
Rivers Arts Festival. 

Bob LaBobgah is married 
to artist, Mary Hamilton. 
Her prints are currently on 
display in Sandford Art 
Gallery through October 
16th. 

If you are interested in art 
or even interested in meeting 
this unique man. Bob LaBob- 
gah will be holding a lecture 
for those interested in Rie- 
mer Center Coffeehouse at 3 
p.m. on October 6th. 




The average American 
man is five feet, eight 
inches tall. The average 
American woman, five 
feet, four inches tall. 

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Spontond by: Engllth Club g 

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Features 




Godspell to give modernized performance 



by Michael J. Downing, 
Features Staff Writer 



The musical "Godspell" 
comes to Clarion's Marwick- 
Boyd Little Theatre for two 
consecutive nights in early 
October. On Friday and Satur- 
day of ALF Week (October 2 
and 3) at 8:15 p.m. the Little 
Theatre will highlight the pop- 
ular and contemporary story 
of Jesus Christ and his apos- 
tles. 

Directed by senior John 
Burja and assistant director 
Sandy Kuzio, the play is uni- 
quely suited for college-age 
performers. Instead of wear- 
ing robes, sandals, and other 
garments of Jesus' day, the 
cast will follow the script and 
wear more modern and 
brightly-colored clothes. 

The cast will retain their 
own names even as they play 
the parts of Jesus, Mary and 
the apostles. The songs and 
words of "Godspell" also in- 
corporate many modern 
themes into the story, making 
Jesus' message as applicable 
today as it was way back then. 
All of these aspects work to 




TAKING A BREATHER. . .The cast pauses a moment during a rehearsal. Photo by Chuck Lizza, Staff Photographer 



provide a contemporary set- 
ting for the telling of a 2,000 
year old story. 
The songs are both beautiful 



and inspiring. Kristen Lepke 
is contnbuting her talents as a 
vocal director as she helps the 
cast with their high notes. 



Joel Mayes plays himself — 
Joel — in the role of Jesus 
Christ. The rest of the cast 
follows suit, retaining their 



own names but also remem- 
bering to bring alive the par- 
ticular role that they play. 

TTie rest of the talented cast 
include: Raymond Mogenis; 
Yvonne Dobrzanski ; Rob Fix; 
David Fry; Jennifer Himes; 
Amy Santa; Becky Seaman, 
Lori Trembley and Peter 
LiVecchi. 

The musical "Godspell" has 
some unique and interesting 
origins. This enduring piece of 
work was written as a senior 
project by John Michael Teb- 
leck at Carnegie Mellon. 

When "Godspell" opened in 
1971, it met with a good deal of 
controversy. It seems that 
many were offended by seeing 
a Christ figure wearing a 
Superman costume and make- 
up. As time went on, however, 
the play became very popular 
with the younger generation 
and has been preserved as a 
vital and beautiful portrayal 
of the life and message of 
Jesus Christ. 

Tickets for "Godspell" are 
on sale at the Riemer ticket of- 
fice. Admission is $5 per per- 
son or free to students with 
valid I.D. 



Hamilton says her art is ''positive magic 



n 



by Susan Daniels, 
Features Staff Writer 



"Fun, exciting, colorful, 
lively." These are only a few 
of the adjectives viewers used 
to describe Mary Hamilton's 
art exhibit entitled "Earth- 
song," which began Sunday, 



Sept. 27 at Sandford Gallery, 
and will run through to Oct. 16. 
Mary Hamilton is a middle- 
aged artist originally from Sli- 
go. She began using the linol- 
eum block style of painting in 
1970, and has used no other 
style since. When asked why 
she prefers this certain style 



ALF: another year 



by Margie Zerbe, 
Features Staff Writer 



Hear ye, hear ye! ! One week 
old is the season of Autumn in 
Clarion, Pennsylvania. And 
along with the changing of 
season has been a slight 
change in population. Some 
40,000 people are expected to 
pass through our streets by 
the week's end or (end of Aut- 
umn Leaf Week). 

I do suppose I could fill you 
in on what's been happening 
this week. The Miss ALF Pag- 
eant, craft shows, art displays 
and sidewalk sales — to name 
just a few. 

Certainly you were aware of 
the 23 food concessionaires, 
weren't you? How about 
giving ttiat meal ticket a rest - 
cotton candy, shish-ka-bobs, 
pizza or egg rolls excite your 
tastebuds? 

Skee-baU, anyone? Posters, 
mugs, stuffed animals and 
yes, even goldfish are prizes 



waiting to be won in the exten- 
sive arcade area. 

Let me bend your ear with a 
last tidbit of information. The 
grand finale. Over 100 units 
are planning to parade down 
Main Street at high noon this 
Saturday. Pull up a curb and 
feel the BOOM, BOOM of the 
drums travel through your 
feet! The theme of Volunteers 
sets the stage for CUP's 1987 
Homecoming game against 
"The Rock" — kickoff at 2 
p.m. 

But alas, these festivities 
cannot be new to you upper- 
classmen, right!? And fresh- 
men, surely you've made it 
i^wn this week. Put those 
Earth Science and Health 
books aside for a few hours. 
Experience all the sights, 
smells and sounds of Autumn 
Leaf Week 1987, because be- 
fore you realize — POOF! It's 
gone. 

Until next year, that is — 



of painting she replied, "When 
I was in graduate school, 
someone made an off-hand 
mention of the technique and 
it seemed to be absolutely 
right." She describes her art 
as "positive magic," 
practiced for the mutual 
benefit of herself and her aud- 
ience. But what exactly does 
she mean by "positive 
magic?" In her own words, 
Hamilton means, "focusing on 
the happy universe intensifies 
the happy powers." 
The way in which Hamilton 

Eroduces her art is not easy. A 
rief description of the pro- 
cess will convey some idea of 
the skill involved. 

In order to make a simple 
black and white print using 
the linoleum-block technique, 
many steps are required. 
First, the original drawing 
must be traced onto the sur- 
face of the block, and the parts 
of the design that are to be 
white on the finished print are 
cut away. The untouched por- 
tions of the surface form plat- 
eaus bound by cut-out valleys. 
Then a thin, even layer of oil- 
based ink is applied to the 
block and transferred to paper 
by pressing it to the block. The 
plateaus come in contact with 
the paper and print black and 
the valleys do not touch the 
paper and those areas remain 
white. It is a bit more compli- 




MARY HAMILTON pictured here with her worl< at the Sandford Gallery. 

Photo by Laurie Wilson, Staff Photographer 



cated to print in several 
colors. In order to do this, 
Hamilton prefers to use what 
is called the reduction method 
in which a single block is 
inked and printed several 
times. Convenientlv, there is a 
videotape proviaed at the 
exhibit to show a detailed ac- 
count of Hamilton using the 
linoleum-block technique to 
create a painting. 

Although Hamilton's first 
concern in creating her prints 
is not money, she does what 
she is able to do to be 
economic so that her prints 



are available to a wide variety 
of people, not just the rich. In 
fact, one can purchase one of 
her prints for anywhere be- 
tween $30 and $75. 

Although Hamilton does not 
enter her studio everyday 
with the intent of creating a 
piece of art that will teach a 
specific lesson, if one observes 
her art freely, with an open 
mind, one can derive many 
messages, and probably no 
two people will derive exactly 
the same message. In the 
words of Kenneth Neal, a doc- 

(See Hamilton. . Page 13) 



12-THE CLARION CALL, Clarion, PA, Thursday, Oct. 1, 1987 



THE CLARION CALL, Clarion, PA, Thursday, Oct. 1, 1987-13 



Education 



Introducing'.... Dr. Mary Ann McLaughlin 



by Shelley Deeter, 
Features Staff Writer 



She's young, intelligent, 
zealous, outgoing, and her 
students love her. Who is this? 
Introducing Dr. Mary Ann 
McLaughlin, one of the faculty 
members of the education de- 
partment here at Clarion. 

As soon as I stepped into 109 
Stevens, I felt like I had been 
there a million times before. 
It's easy to see why Dr. 
McLaughlin is a success at 
teaching, and teaching is what 
she does best. 

For the past 23 years she 
has given a bit of herself to 
students ranging in grades 
from kindergarten through 
the college level. 

Butler University of Indian- 
apolis is where Dr. McLaugh- 
lin began her college career. 
There she obtained a Bache- 
lor's degree in Biology, and 
then landed her first teaching 
job as a Jr. High Biology 
teacher. Because of a short- 
age of teachers in the element- 
ary level, she took a job at a 
school in the inner city of In- 
dianapolis. Being versatile 
was an asset to Dr. McLaugh- 
lin. For the next 10 years she 
taught all grades except the 
fourth in the elementary level. 

Elementary education was 
her calling. While teaching 
she went back to Butler Uni- 
versity to obtain a master's 



degree in Elementary 
Education and Early Child- 
hood Development. In 1975, 
she attended Indiana Univer- 
sity at Bloomington and re- 
ceived a doctorate degree in 
Curriculum Theory. She then 
went on to Kent State where 
now she was teaching her stu- 
dents to do what she did best 
— teach. She was there for 
five years, and then came to 
Clarion where she is definitely 
an asset to an education pro- 
gram well known for its ex- 
tensive curriculum. 

Dr. McLaughlin is partly re- 
sponsible for making our edu- 
cation department even bet- 
ter. She helped design Early 
Childhood EJevelopment as a 
major program, and she said 
she's not through yet. She said 
she's always working on new 
programs or bettering exist- 
ing ones. Keeping the educa- 
tion department up to its rep- 
utation is an ongoing project 
for her. 

Teaching isn't the only thing 
she's good at. Writing is also 
something she happens to do 
very well. She's published sev- 
eral articles on corporal dis- 
cipline in the schools and has 
co-authored a book on the 
same subject. She says that 
punishment in the school sys- 
tem is a big problem with very 
little attention given to it. She 
is in the process of writing an- 



other book, and ultimately 
would like to write even more 
on her favorite subject — edu- 
cation. 

As for the students at Clar- 
ion vs. others she's seen, Dr. 
McLaughlin has nothing but 
raves for the students here. 
"They are very appreciative 
of professors and the pro- 
grams here, and they seem to 
have a clear sense of their 
future." In her opinion, the 
students here are wonderful. 

Sie does, however, have a 
favorite student here. Its her 
husband of four years, whom 
she met when she came to 
teach at Clarion. He is pres- 
ently a graduate student 
studying the Classics and 
Humanities. Who says you 
can't find a good scope at 
Clarion University? Their 
family consists of two cats 
who she loves dearly, and a 
collection of 25 teddy bears. 

Her general advice to stu- 
dents, new and old is this: 
"Study hard, never ever give 
up, and take full advantage of 
the services available to you. 
Your education is valuable 
and can only enhance every- 
thing you do in the future." 
Certainly words to live by. 

As I finished asking ques- 
tions, and she had told me 
everything I needed, I felt like 
I coidd have stayed there for a 
few more hours and listened to 




DR. MARY ANN 

Photo by 



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iMcLAUGHLIN 

Steve McAninch, Staff Photograpfier 

her talk about her experiences 
and her life here at Clarion. 
Her warmth, sincerity and her 
zest for teaching, gave me the 
impression that she'll be stay- 
ing with us for a long, long 
time. I think that's great. 

POSITIONS OPEN 

Committee positions for Stu- 
Senate are open. Applications 
are available in room 232 Eg- 
bert. Deadline for entries is 
Oct. 4. 



s.v/////^/////////////-'//y//////////////////////////y//M'//////////. 



ATTENTION 
ALL GREEKS 

WHAT: 

Best Painted 
Crest contest 

WHERE: 

Universitylnn 
(on the Speakeasy walls) 

WHY: 

For fun & $50.00 to 
each fraternity and 
sorority with the best 
crest. 

WHEN: 

To be judged Oct. 28 
so act now! 

CALL CHRIS SMITH 

FOR MORE INFO: 

226-7200 



i 



RACSbecomes a major part of campus 



by Tom Hughes, 
Features Staff Writer 



RACS is people helping peo- 
ple. Returning Adult and 
Commuting Students (RACS), 
is, "... the Hnk connecting 
adult and commuting students 
with the University," stated 
Mark Candalor, President of 
RACS. This student organiza- 
tion addresses, represents, 
and fulfills the needs and con- 
cerns of returning adult and 
commuter students. 

More than just a represent- 
ational voice, RACS is a social 
and support group for these 
students. Returning to school 
after being out in the working 
world is not an easy transition. 
Feelings of alienation and un- 
assuredness are common 
among returning adult stu- 



toral candidate in Art History 
at the University of Pitts- 
burgh, "the influence of the 
premeditated enriches her 
work, and allows the viewer's 
imagination plenty of room to 
move around in." 

There were a few paintings 
that I especially admired at 
the exhibit. One, entitled "All 
That Glitters," shows how a 
pretty young woman comes to 
the aw^ul realization that be- 
neath her suitor's handsome 
face there lurks a ravenous 
wolf. The moral of this paint- 
ing is that there is both good 
and bad in the universe, and 
being unaware of the bad can 
prove to be fatal. This is a 
moral that is prevalent 
throughout much of 
Hamilton's work: pay atten- 
tion, be aware of the world 
around you, and you are sure 
to be surprised. 

Another painting that I es- 
pecially liked teaches a simi- 
lar moral. The painting is en- 
titled "Waiting." It depicts a 
woman sitting by the tele- 
phone. She is completely 
oblivious to everything going 
on around her because her 
mind is occupied with an ex- 
pected call. But there is some- 
thing remarkable going on 
right outside her window, and 



dents. RACS enables adult 
students to socialize and talk 
with each other about their 
concerns. A relaxing atmo- 
sphere of unity and common 
experience is felt by adults 
and commuters in the RACS 
lounge, located in the base- 
ment of Harvey Hall. 

The RACS organization pro- 
vides information and resour- 
ces about where adult stu- 
dents can obtain information 
about study skills, tutoring, fi- 
nancial aid, and counseling 
and career planning. 

"Hie need for such an organi- 
zation on campus has only re- 
cenUy been met. Before RACS 
was formed, two women from 
the Status of Women Subcom- 
mittee of the President's 
Affirmative Action Commit- 
tee obtained the approval for 



use of Harvey Hall basement 
as a lounge for commuters 
and adult students. Although 
these students now had a 
place to relax and study, they 
still had no organization or of- 
ficial representation with the 
University. 

Realizing that an organiza- 
tion was necessary, concerned 
students banded together and 
drafted a constitution. RACS 
was officially chartered by the 
student Senate in March, 1986. 

For its short history, RACS 
boasts of many accomj)lish- 
ments. Foremost is the 
furnished RACS lounge, com- 
plete with vending machines, 
free lockers, and a quiet study 
area. Annual Christmas par- 
ties and a spring banquet hon- 
oring graduating members 
round out the social activities 



of the 87 active members. 
RACS members have also at- 
tended and made presenta- 
tions at State, Regional, and 
National Adult Learner Con- 
ferences. "The Golden Wing" 
newsletter is published once 
per semester and contains ar- 
ticles of special interest to 
commuter and adult students. 
(Any adults interested in 
working on this newsletter, es- 
pecially adult Communica- 
tions majors, should contact 
RACS). 

Adult students may obtain 
two other publications printed 
expecially for them. The first 
is a brochure available in the 
Admissions Office, which de- 
scribes free services to assist 
the adult students, who com- 
prise approximately 10% of 
Clarion University's student 



Hamilton. 



i(Continued from Page 11) 



all she would have to do is turn 
her head for a moment to have 
one of the most exciting exper- 
iences of her life. Again, the 
moral here: pay attention to 
the world around you. 

In a rather comical painting 
entitled "Wolves Dining Out 
(Observed)", attentiveness 
has paid off. A passer-by glan- 
ces in the window of a restaur- 
ant, not expecting to see any- 
thing unusual, but does, in 
fact, discover something rare 
and strange. He sees wolves 
sitting at a table eating 
dinner. But the look of indif- 
ference on the waitress's face 
suggests that this is a common 
occurrence. "The everyday 
and the out-of-the-ordinary 
are one in the same; it all de- 
pends on one's perspective," 
Kenneth Neal comments. 

Of course there were some 
paintings not meant to convey 
a certain moral, but simply to 
contribute to the viewer s de- 
light. An example of this is 
seen in a painting entitled 
"Dash Away All," which 
shows many disorganized, 
silly reindeer pulling Santa 
Claus on his sleigh. The rein- 
deer are actually composites 
of many different types of 
animals. In this way, Hamil- 
ton strays from the traditional 



or expected, thus allowing the 
viewer to use his or her imag- 
ination to a great extent. 

Something else that 
Hamilton strives to accom- 
plish in her paintings is to 
make something that is vic- 
ious into something appealing. 
For example in her painting 
entitled "Tyrannosaurus," 
Hamilton makes what is us- 
ually perceived as being a 
fearsome prehistoric creature 
into a smiling, sensitive 
creature, happy because her 
eggs have just hatched. 

Hamilton has an excellent 
flair for designing color 
schemes in her work that are 
quite different and unusual, 
yet that merge beautifully. 
Even the colors in which she 
chooses to mat and frame her 
paintings are very original in 
thought and enhance the 
quality of the painting even 
more. 

Although Hamilton does not 
dislike the city, she finds 
much more inspiration for her 
art in the country. She claims 
to find something reassuringly 
permanent in the elements of 
the country, almost a sense of 
history. "When you look at a 
horse or a tree," observes 
Hamilton, "you're looking at 
something you might have 



seen 400 or 1000 years ago." 

When asked what she felt 
the public's reaction was to 
her exhibit, Hamilton simply 
replied, "People have a good 
time." She is a woman of few 
words who seemed to like 
making close observations of 
people observing her work. 

Kenneth Neal also has this 
to say about Hamilton, "She 
gives us liberty to dream, but 
she also gives us a definite 
context in which to do it; she 
encourages us to meditate, 
but she instructs us in our 



body. The second publication 
is the "Adult Student Hand- 
book," which is available in 
the RACS lounge. Funded 
through a grant from the Qar- 
ion University Foundation, 
this handbook by student 
author Jeff Rankin addresses 
the questions of adult students 
about admissions, financial 
information, scheduling, cam- 
pus resources, and "Where to 
Go for Help" listing in the 
back. 

The coordinator of the 
"Adult Student Handbook" is 
Ms. Donna Schaeffer of 
Special Services. Also the ad- 
ministrative advisor to RACS, 
she has been instrumental to 
the success of the organiza- 
tion. Said RACS President 
Mark Candalor, "I couldn't 

(See RACS. ..Page 14) 



meditations, and gives us 
themes upon which to nourish 
them." All one has to do is 
view and experience her 
paintings in order to under- 
stand this statement. 

Hamilton gives the viewer 
much of the real and unreal to 
observe and consider in a 
painting. This remarkable 
blend, along with intricate 
detail, decorative borders, 
and explosive color make for 
an exciting escapade for the 
imagination. 



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14-THE CLARION CALL, Clarion, PA, Thursday, Oct. 1, 1987 



Senior Profile 



Campus C/OSe-Up Brett Carter 



By Kellie Acquaro 
Features Staff Writer 



If anyone on this campus 
doesn't know Brett Carter it 
would be to your advantage 
to meet him. To put it lightly 
Brett's personality is very 
unique. It seems to me that 
comic relief describes him 
best. 

Our interview started 
when Brett and one of his 
friends rattled off statistics 
about their body parts — 5% 
body fat, 210 pounds, etc. 
They wanted me to put them 
in this article but I think I'll 
skip over that. 

Brett comes from a large 
family of 7 children, 5 sisters 
and 1 brother. Brett just 
happens to be the youngest. 
He was born in East Liberty 
of Pittsburgh. Brett gradu- 
ated from Westinghouse 
High School in 1984. During 
his 4 years at Westinghouse 
he was in the scholars pro- 
gram, played basketball his 
junior year, and played de- 
fensive end on their football 
team as a senior. Westing- 
house is known to be a very 
rough place to go to school, 
but Brett said, "I did o.k. for 
the type of atmosphere I was 
in." 

After high school Brett's 
next stop was up to college. 
According to Brett he was a 
"first generation college 
student." He was the first 
child in his family to go to 
college. Brett's family is 
very important to him. His 
parents have a big influence 
on all his decisions. Brett told 
me, "My mother and father 
are very supportive through- 
out my decisions in life." 

Clarion University suits 
Brett well. He said, I have 
everj^thing I need up here." 
When I asked Brett why he 



chose to attend our fine uni- 
versity, he replied, "I didn't 
want to go too far from home 
and I like the small college 
atmosphere." Brett also 
thought "the food was going to 
be good, they tricked me at 
orientation." 

By talking with Brett it 
was easy to see what in- 
terests him. Brett holds the 
position of treasurer and IFC 
representative for his 
fraternity. Kappa Alpha Psi. 
Kappa Alpha Psi is involved 
with many social service pro- 
jects, such as giving turkeys 
away on Thanksgiving to 
needy homes. Brett 
commented, "We are not like 
a drinking fraternity, we 
have parties to socialize and 
dance." Brett is one of 10 
brothers on this College 
campus. Thinking on the re- 
lationship of his fraternity 
brothers Brett remarked, "I 
like to hang out with my fra- 
ternity brothers, we are real- 
ly close, really close, if you 
see one of us you'll see the 
other not far behind. ' ' 

Weight lifting is also a big 
part of Brett's life. He goes 
faithfully to the weight room 
every day. He won his first 
competition in high school. 
Just this past semester Brett 
and partner Lee Shaw won 
the intramural weightlifting 
competition. 

Brett is an accounting 
major and after he graduates 
he plans to work on his mas- 



think of anyone we would 
rather have as an advisor for 
RACS." 

Future goals and plans on 
tap for RACS include the ex- 
pectation of 100 active mem- 
bers this year, and the use of 
a computer data-base for 
membership records. On Oc- 



ters at the University of 
Pittsburgh. Academically 
Brett is a member of the Ac- 
counting Club and isin Phi 
Eta Sigma, a National Honor 
Society. Brett put it very 
simply, "If you want to do 
good in school you'll do 
good." 

Most students move off 
campus by the time that they 
are seniors, but no. . .not 
Brett Carter, he decided to 
live in almost every dorm on 
campus. He lived in Forest 
Manor for 2 weeks, than was 
an RA in Wilkinson, then 
moved to Ralston and finally 
he has been residing as an 
RA in Campbell for the past 
two years. Brett likes being 
an RA and I am sure he is a 
very fun one. 

I asked Brett what he 
wanted people to know about 
him, he replied, "You never 
know what you want people 
to know about you." Well, 
here's a little something I 
want you to know about Brett 
Carter. A few short years ago 
a young fourth grader named 
Brett Carter decided that he 
didn't want to take his gym 
class. His teacher told him 
that he had to go outside and 
run the 60 yard dash. The 
problem was that when Brett 
changed into his gym clothes 
he had one dress sock on and 
one sweat sock on. He said, 
"My friends laughed me right 
out of class. I cried." (Brett 




BRETT CARTER 

Photo by Pat Cooper, Staff Photograplier 



RACS.... 



tober 9, 10' and 11 Venango 
campus will host a Regional 
Adult Learner Conference. 
RACS President Candalor and 
advisor Ms. Schaeffer will 
make a presentation on 
"Communication Links Be- 
tween Adult Learners and 
their Organizations." Also, 



don't kill me for putting this in 
here.) 

Being a sociable person is 
not easy for some pleople but 
Brett has it down to a 
science. Brett is a fun person 
who can make people laugh. 

(Continued from Page 13) 

former RACS President Kim 
Haizlett and Mr. Ken Grugel 
of the Financial Aid Office wUl 
have a presentation on finan- 
cial aid for adult students. 

A memorial scholarship 
fund for the late Rick Redick 
(former RACS v.p.) is in the 
process of being established. 




JOIN US FOR LITURGY (MASS) THIS 
WEEKEND AT 

IMMACULATE CONCEPTION CHURCH 

A permanent Catholic presence in Clarion 
since 1856 ■ 



Our parish has roots in the past, 
but eyes to the future! 

Rev. John Kuzilla, Pastor 

226-8433 

Rev. Monty Bayers, Campus Minister 

226-6869 

Sr. Lisa Paffrath, Campus Minister 

Newman House, 831 Maronee St. 226-6651 

Saturday: 5:30 and 7:30 p.m. 

Sunday: 7:30, 9:00, 11:15, 12:30 

Sacrament of Reconciliation (Confession) 

Sat. from 3:30-4:30 and 6:30-7:15 



This quality in him is some- 
thing to be appreciated. The 
way he acts towards people 
is a special part of his per- 
sonality. Brett Carter is a 
person everyone should have 
a chance to meet. 



If enough funds are raised 
through donations and fund- 
raisers, RACS will be able to 
award scholarships to adult 
students in the future. 

Why should returning adult 
and commuter students join 
RACS? RACS is the best 
source of information and 
support for adult students; 
and there is no better place 
than the RACS lounge to meet 
and socialize with other com- 
muter and adult students, 
agree RACS Vice President 
Jack McLaughlin and secre- 
tary Ken Snyder. 

In less than two years, 
RACS has grown from a mere 
idea into an integral part of 
the campus, voicing the opin- 
ions of often forgotten stu- 
dents. Their new motto, 
"Learning - The Rage at Any 
Age" is typical of the positive 
outlook of its members. The 
feeling behind RACS is best 
sunmiarized by its president, 
Mark Candalor, "I get chills 
down my spine whenever I 
think of people wanting to help 
other people, that's the way it 
ought to be." 

Meetings are held every 
other Wednesday at noon in 
the RACS lounge. 



THE CLARION CALL, Clarion, PA, Thursday, Oct. 1, 1987-15 



Movie Review 






''Lost Boys'' - horror or comedy? 



by Ray Tomczak and Cindy Karpaw 
Features Staff Writers 

"If all the corpses buried 
around these parts suddenly 
decided to stand up, vou'd 
have one hell of a population 
ejrolosion." 

Welcome to Santa Carla, 
California, "murder capital of 
the world." This is the envir- 
onment into which the Emer- 
son family of Phoenix, Lucy 
and sons Michael and Sam, 
move at the beginning of "The 
Lost Boys," the new vampire 
picture from Warner Broth- 
ers. Dianne Wiest, Jason Pat- 
rick and Corey Haim as the 
Emersons move to Santa 
Carla to live with Lucy's 
father, an eccentric old coot 
played by Bernard Hughes. 

In an early series of scenes 
set in and around the local 
amusement park, the various 
members of the Emerson 
family meet the other central 
characters in the movie. 
Michael sees the beautiful and 
mysterious Starr (Jami 
Gertz) at a concert and, pur- 
suing her, meets up with the 
gang of bikers led by David 
(Kieffer Sutherland), who are 
the vampires or "Lost Boys" 
of the tide. 

Breaking away from his old- 



er brother, Sam ducks into a 
comic shop and meets the 
Frog brothers, Edgar and 
Allen, who have dedicated 
their lives to "truth, justice, 
and the American way," not 
to mention ridding Santa Car- 
la of vampires. 

Lucy, for her part, meets 
Max (Edward Herman), the 
manager of the local video 
shop, who, impressed by her 
generous nature when she 
helps reunite a lost child with 
his mother, gives her a job 
and seems to take a romantic 
interest in her. 

Michael goes with Starr, 
David, and his gang back to 
their headquarters, the ruins 
of a grand hotel destroyed by 
an earthquake back in 1906. 
Here, Michael becomes one of 
the boys when he drinks from 
a bottle of what he believes to 
be wine, but is actually blood. 
Next, Michael joins the gang 
in their nightly activities, 
which this night include hang- 
ing from a railroad trestle 
wWle a train rumbles over- 
head, letting go, and falling 
into the fog. The next thing 
Michael knows, he's waking 
up in his bed at 2 o'clock in the 
afternoon. 

After this, Sam begins to no- 



Jp In the groove 



by Kevin Beam and Wayne Brosius, 
Features Staff Writers 



ARTIST 

Bruce Springsteen 
Hooters 

Belinda Carlisle 

Yes 

DefLeppard 



WHAT'S NEW 

(New Singles soon to enter your ears) 
TITLE 

Brilliant Disguise 

Satellite 

Heaven is a Place 

on Earth 

Love Will Find A Way 

Animal 

NOTES 

• October 13th is the release date for an A & M star studded Christmas 
package. "A Very Special Christmas" is the name of the record which 
features songs from WHITNEY HOUSTON, BRUCE SPRINGSTEEN, 
MADONNA, U2 & BON JOVI. Prodeeds from the album will help outthe 
Special Olympics. 

• A recent death which sadly (for the most part) didn't make the news 
headlines, was the passing of PETER TOSH. The former Reggae great 
was shot and killed along with three others at his home in Kingston, Ja- 
maica, on September 11. The shootings were a result of a dispute be- 
tween TOSH and the gunmen. His death comes soon after the release of 
possibly his best album ever, No Nuclear War. 

• The BEE GEES sure hope to make a lot of money with their new E.S.P. 
album, and youngest brother Andy sure needs it! The troubled Gibb 
brother filed for bankruptcy this month (Sept.) with debts of more than 
$1 million. 

•Alternative band the DEAD MILKMEN raised a few eyebrows recent- 
ly with an "udderly" ridiculous promotional event. The Enigma record- 
ing artists, the MILKMEN, shared the stage at an in-house performance 
in California with an 850-pound cow. There was also a cow-milking con- 
t^t held in the parking lot. 

• Ike Turner has found himself in some trouble. Not with Tina - but the 
law! He recently appeared m court on drug charges. It seems ol' Ike 
flosses with cocaine. . .or at least that's what was found in his dental 
floss container. A new form of tartar control maybe? 

• O.K., you know John Cougar Mellencamp has a new album out - his 
ninth. But did you know he may soon have a movie out? The 35-year-old 
Mellencamp says he'll play a country singer who falls in love with an 
old flame. "Riding the Cage" will begin production next year. 

• Look out! Jim and Tammy Bakker are back in the music business. An 
album is to be out soon. The first cut to be heard from the album is called 
"The Ballad of Jim and Tammy." If you're real fans of Uie Bakkers ( and 
we know you are! ) you'll be smiling to know a tour is planned. 



tice changes in his brother's 
b^avior, such as an aversion 
to direct sunlight. When Sam's 
dog Nanook attacks Michael, 
and the two brothers notice 
that Michael's reflection in the 
mirror has begun to fade, Sam 
needs no more convincing that 
his brother has indeed become 
a vampire. So he calls the 
Frog brothers, who gave him 
their number on the back of a 
comic book entitled 
"Vampires Everywhere" in 
case he would ever need them. 

Reluctant to kill Michael, as 
per the Frog's advice, Sam 
decides to destroy the head 
vampire, since that would re- 
turn all the half -vampires, 
those who had not yet made 
their first kill, to normal. At a 
disastrous dinner party, the 
boys test Max with garlic, 
water, and a niirror believing 
him to be the head vampire, 
but he passes their tests and 
appears to be a normal 
human. 

Now sure that David is the 
head vampire, the boys go to 
confront him in his lair. Mich- 
ael rescues Starr and another 
young half-vampire named 
Laddie, while Edgar kills the 
vampire named Margo. How- 
ever, at this point the other 
vampires awaken and the 
would-be vampire-slayers are 
forced to flee back to the 
Emerson household to await 
the attack of the revenge- 
seeking vampires. 

The final battle with the lost 
boys is a fast-paced special ef- 
fects light show with all the 
teenaged vampires destroyed, 
but the head vampire still at 
large. In the end, the head 
vampire is killed in a surpris- 
ing manner by the one charac- 
ter you'd probably least 
expect to do it. From there, 
the movie concludes on an up- 
beat note, as the screen fades 
to black and the credits roll. 

MS. KARPAW: I felt that 
this was a fantastic movie, but 
not for its horror, for the com- 
edy element it contained. 
"The Lost Boys" was one of 
the funniest movies I've seen 
in a long time. 



MR. TOMCZAK: The begin- 
ning didn't seem like so much 
of a comedy, though. The 
change to comedy was kind of 
abrupt, like somebody said in 
the middle of the movie, 
"Hey, this isn't working out as 
a horror movie — let's make it 
a comedy." 

MS. KARPAW: I disagree. I 
think the movie wasn't intend- 
ed to be strictly a horror film. 
Besides, the funny parts, 
which dealt basically with the 
Frog brothers and Michael's 
brotfier Sam, made the film a 
little more realistic. The boys 
acted exactly the way you'd 
expect young kids to act, and 
that's why it was so funny. For 
example, when Sam realized 
that Michael truly was a vam- 
pire, the first words out of his 
mouth were, "Wait, 'til mom 
finds out!" 

MR. TOMCZAK: Well, I 
agree that it was a very funny 
movie, and I liked it on that 
level, but for a movie about 
vampires, it should have had a 
few scares in it. Even "Ghost- 
busters" scared me a couple 
of times. 

MS. KARPAW: Yes, but 
like I said, I don't think horror 
was supposed to play a big 
part in this movie. It had a 
sort of mysterious quality, a 
superstitious sort of scary- 



ness. It wasn't intended to be a 
"hack and slash" in my opin- 
ion. 

MR. TOMCZAK: Well, for 
one thing, a movie doesn't 
have to be a slash-fest to be 
scary. In fact these movies 
are just sickening. You could 
see in a few early scenes that 
they were trying to scare 
people, but it just didn't seem 
to work. The first couple of 
horror scenes were just too 
confusing to scare anyone be- 
cause you just didn't know 
what was going on. 

MS. KARPAW: That's 
where I think the mysticism 
comes in. You weren't exactly 
sure what was happening, and 
that's what made it seem so 
strange and mysterious. 

MR. TOMCZAK: Well, once 
the movie settled down into 
being a comedy, I really liked 
it. IrStead of a series of stupid 
one-liners, the humor arose 
from how real teenagers 
might deal with this situation, 
especially like the bathtub full 
of holy water and garlic. The 
squirtguns full of that solution 
were a great idea, too. 

MS. KARPAW: And the 
Frog brothers' commando 
uniforms and their total 
seriousness about the mission 
they were on were terrific ad- 

(See Boys. ..Page 18) 



CLARIONCINEMAS 



GARBY 226-8521 



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16-THE CLARION CALL, Clarion, PA, Thursday, Oct. 1, 1987 




ALF WEEKEND 

FRIDAY, OCT. 2 & 
SAT., OCT. 3 

OPEN TILL 4 A.M. 
LATE NIGHT MUCHIN 






ALL WEEKEND 



liaise a 



eco 






r 



Buy One Get One 
Free Single 
After 9 p.m. 



L 



Good at participating Wendy's 
Not valid with any other offer or 
KIDS' FUN PAK,' ^^ 
Please present coupon when ordering 
One coupon per customer. 
Cheese extra and tax extra 
where applicable. 

Offer Expires 10/8/87 




Buy One Get One 
Free Single 
After 9 p.m. 



Good at participating Wendy's. 

Not valid with any other offer or 

KIDS' FUN PAK.™ 

Please present coupon when ordering. 

One coupon per customer. 

Cheese extra and tax extra 

where applicable 

Of far expires 10/8/87 




Roving Reporter asks. 



THE CLARION CALL, Clarion, PA, Thursday, Oct. 1, 1987-17 
Photos and questions By Mike Bordo, and Peter B. McMHIen, 
Features Staff Writers 



How do you stand on the N.F.L players strike, and why? 




Debbie McAdams 
Junior, Marlieting 
I don't think the players should 
be on strike. 



Ed Yovetich 
Senior, Business 
I'm with the owners, because 
the players are making too much 
money. 



Ann Bonfardine 
Grad.. Library Science 

It has no effect on my life. 



Debbie Mason, 
Freshman, Business 
The players, just because. 



Nick "Budda" Lavanone 
Sophomore, Undecided 
N.F.L. The players make too 
much money. 



ACROSS 

ICry 
4 Plague 
9 Offspring 

12 Fruit drink 

13 Mountain 
nymph 

14 Imitate 

15 Runs easily 
17 Join 

19 Comfort 

20 Sacred image 

21 Fright 

23 Liquor vessel 
27 Put up stalce 

29 Apportion 

30 Cooled lava 

31 Cheer 

32 Omit from 
pronunciation 

34 Greek letter 

35 Latin 



conjunction 

36 Genus of 
maples 

37 Challenges 
39 Unselfish 

42 Burrowing 
animal 

43 Den 

44 Cripple 

46 Become aware 

of 
48 Pardon 

51 Limb 

52 Summon forth 

54 Haul 

55 Cry of sheep 

56 Tendon 

57 Before 

DOWN 

1 Algonquian 
Indian 

2 Room in harem 



The 

Weekly 

Crnsswnrd 

Puzzle 



Alumni Spotlight 



Graduate holds high position 



by Susan Smith, 
Features Staff Writer 



If you have ever wondered if 
Clarion has any Alumni in 
high places - wonder no more. 
In a recent press release from 
Harrisburg, Barbara Burtell, 



fiscal code as it pertains to the 
Treasury Department and 
other substantive issues 
involving the department. 

Greene commented, "Ms. 
Burtell also will be assisting 
me in my work on several of 
the boards and conunissions 



3 Under 

4 Pedal digits 

5 Transgressed 

6 Roman bronze 

7 A continent: 



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abbr. 

8 Taught 

9 Canonized 
person 

10 Choose 

1 1 Born 

16 Biblical seed 
18 Not one 

20 Frosted 

21 Journeys forth 

22 Growing out of 

24 Arabian 
chieftains 

25 Artist's stand 

26 Lift 
28 Falls 

33 Condescending 
look 

34 Advance in rank 
36 At a distance 
38 Among 

40 South American 
animal 

41 Fume 

45 Again 

46 Experimental 
room: colloq. 

47 Period of time 

48 Study 

49 Neither 

50 Female sheep 
53 Roman six 



class of 1981, has been appoint- 
ed to the position of Deputy ^ which I am particularly in 
State Treasurer for the Com- terested, the Delaware River 
monwealth of Pennsylvania. Port Authority and the Penn- 
State Treasurer G. Davis sylvania Housing Finance 




Greene Jr. announced that 
Burtell will be responsible for 
research and program de- 
velopment on iniatives such as 
the expansion of the time de- 



Agency." 
Burtell has been employed 



BARBARA BURTELL, 1981 graduate 

agement and Investments and 
was responsible for a $5.5 
billion short-term investment 



by the Treasi^y Department portfolio, management of a 
since June 1981. Pnor to her $ioo billion annual cash flow, 



promotion, she was the direc- 



posit program, revision of the tor of the Bureau of Cash Man- 

Classified Ads 



COUEGE PRESS SOVICE 



The Sisters of Alpha Sigma Alpha 

would like to welcome everyone 
back this semester and ask that 
whoever borrowed our sign to 
please return it. No questions will 
be asked. 

TYPEWRITER SERVICE: Repair, 
clean and adjust. Factory trained 
technicians. Free estimates. 
CLARION OFFICE EQUIPMENT 

Rt. 66 South, 226-8740. 

EARN Ihundred weeklyl in your 
spare time. United Services of 
America is looking for home work- 
ers to perform mail services. In- 
centive programs available. For 



information send large self-ad- 
dressed stamped envelope to 
U.S.A. 24307 Magic Mtn. Pkwy., 
Suite No. 306, Valencia, CA 91355. 

The BROTHERS of PHI SIGMA 
KAPPA would like to thank the 
Sisters of SIGMA SIGMA SIGMA 
for a great mixer! Let's do it 
again!! 

The Sisters of ALPHA SIGMA AL- 
PHA would like to thank everyone 
who came to our Pledge-Pick-up 
Party on Friday night ! 



maintenance of the state's $4.5 
billion long-term debt and 
commercial paper program. 

Ms. Burtell received a B.S. 
Degree in Economics and Fi- 
nance from Clarion Univer- 
sity. She also holds a M.B.A. 
degree from Pennsylvania 
State University. Ms. Burtell, 
formerly from Pittsburgh, 
now resides in Harrisburg. 

As an undergraduate of 
Clarion, Burtell served on the 
board of directors of the 
Qarion University Alumni As- 
sociation and the Clarion Uni- 
versity Foundation. 




tired of not being heard the 

men of wisdom moved far into 

the mountains to live in 

solitude — 



WE CAN LISTEN! 



HARVEY 
HALL 



United Campus Ministry 226^047 



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226-5401 

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any salon service 

Come into Coke's Creative 
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to look and feel your best ever. 

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• HAND TREATMENTS • BODY WAXING 

• TANNING (Lip. Chin, Eyebrows, Legs, etc.) 
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18-THE CLA'RION CALL, Clarion, PA, Thursday, Oct. 1, 1987 



Student Alumni 



Organization is learning more 



by Christine Kropcho, 
Features Staff Writer 



As I walked into the Student 
Alumni Association's office, I 
was immediately impressed 
with the personality of their 
advisor, Mr. Kennedy. I knew 
that the Student Alumni As- 
sociation would become an 
important organization to this 
campus. 

The Student Alumni Asso- 
ciation (S.A.A.) is the first or- 
ganization of its kind here at 
Clarion, and as Mr. Kennedy 
states, "It is exciting to see 
the enthusiasm of students, 
especially when it has the po- 
tential of being a benefit to the 
college community." S.A.A. 
will serve as a link between 
the past, present, and future 
alumni here at Qarion. The 
S.A.A. wishes to help strength- 
en the bonds between today's 
students and past graduates. 

Also, the Student Alumni 
Association will help the 
future graduates stay en- 
gaged in University activities. 



S.A.A. hopes to develop a re- 
lationship with the students 
while they are still here at 
Clarion, so they will wish to 
return to the University in 
future years. 

One activity, Mr. Kennedy 
states, that the Student Alum- 
ni Association wiU help with, 
is a reception, sponsored by 
Alumni Affairs, for alumni on 
Homecoming Day. This re- 
ception will be held in Chapel 
Park. Here, in a relaxed set- 
ting, the 400 alunmi planning 
to attend will be able to enjoy 
the homecoming festivities 
and tlie annual ALF parade. 
The S.A.A. will assist in regis- 
tration, serving food, and di- 
recting traffic. 

The Student Alumni Asso- 
ciation hopes to develop a 
better understanding of now 
Alumni Affairs function and to 
become involved in recruit- 
ment and to help with student 
relations. Any one interested 
in becoming a member of 
S.A.A., may make application 
at a later time in the year. 



Boys.... 



(Continued from Page 15) 



ditions to the movie too. I did 
think, however, that the writ- 
ers should have developed 
Starr's character a little 
more. Jami Gertz is a wonder- 
ful actress — you may re- 
member her from the short- 
lived TV sitcom "Square 
Pegs" in which she played a 
young yuppie named Muffy. 
Her part in this movie should 
have been built up, in my opin- 
ion, so we could have seen a 
little more of her talent. 

MR. TOMCZAK: The movie 
is full of great performances, 
especially Bernard Hughes 
and Corey Feldman. Feldman 
was Edgar Frog, and it seems 
like he's getting typecast at an 
early age in the "crazy teen- 
ager" role, here as the 
iSmbo-vampire killer, and in 
"Stand by Me" as Teddy 
DuChamp. 

MS. KARPAW: And 
Hughes played the festive 




grandpa character. We ne- 
glected to mention the ex- 
tremely humorous parts that 
he had in the movie, such as 
the very last line of the movie, 
when the seemingly-naive 
grandpa, looking at his house 
full of slaughtered bodies and 
mutilated corpses, stated, 
"The thing I never did like 
about Santa Carla is all the 
damn vampires." 

MR. TOMCZAK: The 
reason you're really reading pi 1771 r Qpji 1 rT|OI\| 
this is to find out whether to ' "-'^^LII OWLU I \^\ \l 
see this movie or not, so V^d 
say, yes, go see "The Lost 
Boys," but don't go expecting 
to see a horror movie. Be pre- 
pared instead to see a really 
funny comedy. 

MS. KARPAW: Even 
though the movie did have a 
lot of humor in it, I think you'll 
like it because of the subject 
matter also. "The Lost Boys" 
is a movie that should defin- 
itely be seen by all. 




I 



THE CLARION CALL, Clarion, PA, Thursday, Oct. 1, 1987-19 



SNL Nora Dunn, of Saturday Night Live, will perform at CUP in Marwick-Boyd Auditorium on Friday, Oct. 2, at 8 

p.m. The event is sponsored by CUP Center Board. 



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THE BUDGETING 
GOURMET 

by Angela Covelli, 

Features Staff Writer 

TACO SALAD 

A Taco Salad is a super main dish surprise. For those of you who hke 
Mexican food this will be a smash. For you out there who have a distaste 
for Mexican dishes there is a shimmer of light at the dark end of the 
tunnel. 

We at Clarion know there is not much in the way of a "Chi Chi's" so the 
Taco Salad will hopefully be ethnic enough for you. 

Of course that is if you make it correctly. But follow the recipe and 
I'm confident that you'll do alright. 

The preparation is easy and it does not take too much time. There will 
not be any lengthy number of hours that you have to slave over that hot 
stove. So get cookin' kids. 

You will have to run out and shop for a few items : Price 

l/5of a head of lettuce 14 

'/z tomato 12 

V4 cucumber 08 

^/z tsp. diced onion 02 

1 handful of colby cheese 26 

1 handful of nacho chips/Dorito chips 09 

4 shakes of Italian dressing — 09 

Total 1.35 

First make a salad on a dinner plate, (lettuce, tomato, cucumber and 
onion) Put the ground meat browned on top of this. Next sprinkle colby 
cheese. Pulverize the chip's (either/or Nacho or Dorito) toss them on top. 
Douse with the salad dressing for the "Topper." 

DEVOUR! 
Hope this creation is a fi^ta to your mouth. 

COPIERS - TYPEWRITERS - CALCULATORS 

Clarion 
Office 
Equipment 

Route 66 South. Clarion. PA 16214 
814) 226-8740 

SUPPLIES - FURNITURE - SERVICE 




&WOMTS... 




m ■ eOc¥ * IRS ^ Wll¥ 

NFL Strike 
week two 

by David Mahaffey 

Sports Editor 

The NFL strike is now in its se- 
cond week and two sides are still 
locked into positions that they 
each call "immovable." 

I think that the management 
should worry less about fielding a 
replacement team this weekend 
and start to get down to some ser- 
ious negotiations with the 
players. 

Last Sunday the networks tele- 
vised last year's Super Bowl and 
Major League Baseball. I don't 
know what other fans thought, 
but to me it was like losing an old 
friend not having professional 
football to watch last Sunday. 

Take a look at what is keeping 
the two sides apart in this strike 
and you will find that same 
phrase that was listed in 1982, 
free agency. The players didn't 
get it five years ago and they will 
not get it this year, and I don't 
think they should. 

Free agency has done nothing 
for baseball, but give j)ie Yanr 
kees a title or two and drive the 
salary scale through the ceiling. 

This Sunday teams are going to 
take to the fields around the NFL 
with only a few recognizeable 
names, instead of Dan Marino 
this week we will be watching 
QB's like David Nourrie. Nourrie 
will start for the New York Jets, 
who is he? What college is he 
from? Has he ever played foot- 
ball before? 

These are a couple of questions 
that people will be asking on 
Sunday as the so called scab 
teams take the field. 

As for me, this Sunday, barring 
a miracle settlement, I'll just go 
down to the park and watch the 
pigeon races, at least they are the 
same pigeons that started the 
season on the team. On the 
bright side of sports this week : 

*The Minnesota Twins clinched 
their first American League West 
title since 1970. 

*San Francisco clinched the 
National League West on Monday 
with a win over San Diego. Sorry 
EZ-E. 

*Penn State 27, Boston College 
17. 

*My hat is off to Atlanta 
Braves* owner Ted Turner for 
bringing in Phil Niekro and let- 
ting him pinch his final major 
league game with the club that he 
spent his first 25 years with. 

Niekro is one of the great men 
of baseball and deserved to go out 
with his head held high. Even 
though the Braves lost the game 
to San Francisco the fans in 
Atlanta let Niekro know how 
much he has been appreciated 
over the years by giving him a 
seven minute standing ovation 
when he left the game. 



X-Country off to good start 



by David Mahaffey, 
Sports Editor 



The 1987 version of the 
Clarion University men's and 
women's cross country teams 
are off to a good start, accord- 
ing to coach Bill English. 

English, now in his 16th 
year at Clarion thinks his 
young men's team is running 
well. "They are really doing a 
good job," said English. 

The men harriers are 3-0 in 
dual meet action this fall and 
have a fourth place finish in 
the Mansfield Invitational and 
a first at the Pitt-Bradford In- 
vitational. 

The Golden Eagle men 
started off the season with a 
win over Lock Haven and then 
finished fourth at Mansfield. 

Last Wednesday, the men 
had a double dual meet with 
St. Bonaventure and Du- 
quesne. 

The results of this race were 
more wins for Qarion. 

Tony Neibar led the way 
covering the course in 25:26 to 
win the meet. Following Nei- 
bar across the finish were Ed 
Kinch, at 26:00, Rich Zajac at 
26:27, Mark Stallsmith at 
26:27, Pat Janovich at 27:41 
and Steve Williams at 27 : 51. 

Ihe Golden Eagles defeated 
St. Bonaventure 23-33 and Du- 
quesne 17-44 taking places 1, 2, 
5, 6, 9 and 1, 2, 3, 4, 7 respec- 
tively against the schools. 

"Our strength is that we're 
able to group our runners to- 
gether," said English and this 
was evident in the double dual 



meet as the scoring runners 
and displacers were 1:30 
apart. 

The women's team had 
trouble fielding a full squad 
early in the year because of 
injuries, according to coach 
English. 

Last Wednesday was the 
first time this season the Lady 
harriers fielded a full team 
and the result was an 18-31 win 
over Duquesne. 

Senior Denise Johnson led 
the way for Clarion with a 
20:59 for the 2.9 mile course. 

"Denise is running the best 
she ever has," said Coach En- 
^sh, "She is going to leave 
college having her best year. ' ' 

Both the men's and wo- 
men's teams traveled to the 
Pitt-Bradford Invitational last 
weekend, and brought home 
similar results, a first place 
finish. 

TTie men's team had an im- 
pressive performance, ac- 
cording to English, "especial- 
ly when you take into consid- 
eration that our number two 
and number three runners 
didn't go," said English. 

Picking up the slack for 
Qarion were Mark Stallsmith, 
who finished in fourth place at 




1987 LADY EAGLES ARE Front row from left, Kristen Swick, Laura 

James, Denise Johnson; Back row. Rose McCabe, Julie Parry, Jo Buck and 
Shelley Mulig. Photo by Steve Cutri, Staff Pfiotographer 



place finisher Ed Kinch to 
complete the meet with 48 
points to defeat the six-team 



''The teams are young, but they are 
improving.** 

—Coach English 



the Invitation, Jack Volzer, field of St. Bonaventure, St. 
Steve Williams, and Rusty Francis, Mercyhurst, Pitt- 
Flynn combined with third Bradford and Gannon. 





^7^^^ <|iy|^^ 



MEN'S X-COUNTRY Team members for 1987 are front row, Rusty Flynn, Rick Zajac, Tony Neiber, Paul Hammond, 

Steve Williams. Back row, Pat Jonovick, Mark Stallsmith, Ed Kinch and Dave Hartman. Photo by Steve Cutri, 

Staff Photographer 



The women pulled together 
in only their second run as a 
team and finished with a low 
score of 44. 

Qarion had the number one 
finisher and number three as 
Kristin Swick finished first 
and Denise Johnson finished 
number 2. 

"Kristin ran a beautiful 
race," said Coach English of 
his Junior runner. 

X-Country Extra: 

TTiere is an interesting point 
of how the women's team is 
able to field a team. 

In cross country a team con- 
sists of a minimum of five run- 
ners, and Qarion needed one 
more to be able to compete. 

Jo Buck is now fillmg in as 
the fifth runner to enable the 
girls' team to run. 

The roster for the 1987 X- 
countryteamis: 

Name YEAR 

Rusty Flynn Fr. 

Dave Girts So. 

Paul Hammond Sr. 

Dave Hartman So. 

Patrick Janovick Fr. 

Ed Kinch Jr. 

Tony Neibar So. 

Keith Rice Fr. 

Mark Stallsmith So. 

Jack Volzer So. 

Steve Williams Fr. 

Richard Zajac So. 

Jo Buck So. 

Laura James Sr. 

Denise Johnson Sr. 

Heather Masters Fr. 

Roseann McCabe Jr. 

Shelley Mulig Fr. 

Julie Parry Fr. 

Kathy Seman Fr. 

Kristen Swick Fr. 



20-THE CLAftlON CALL, Clarion, PA, Thursday, Oct. 1, 1987 



In Fourth Quarter 



Eagles down Vulcans 17-14 



by Rick Kapres, 
Sports Staff Writer 



Golden Eagle tailback Sean 
Morrissey scored on a one- 
yard run with six minutes left 
in the fourth quarter to give 
Qarion a 17-14 win over PSAC 



rival California. The run 
capped an eight-play 73-yard 
dnve which was keyed by a 
31-yard pass from Golden 
Eagle quarterback Doug Em- 
minger to tight end Dan Hast- 
ings on 4th and three from the 
California 32. 



Previous to Hastings' catch, 
Qarion had punted on 4th and 
8, but the Vulcans were off- 
side. The five yard penalty 
gave Qarion an easier way at 
the first down, which Clarion 
head coach Gene Sobolewski 
decided to attempt, thus re- 




GOLDEN EAGLE FOOTBALL The Clarion University football team will host "The Rock" this Saturday in home- 
coming action. Clarion Call File Photo 



Light Up With SPIRIT! at the: 




B.Y.O.M. (Bring Your Own Marshmallows) 

and 

PEP RALLY 

COME WATCH THE SLIPPERY 
ROCK ROCKETS BURN!!! 

Get fired up with the cheerleaders, 
team, and coaches! 

^ 6:30 p.m. FRIDAY NIGHT ^ 
BY NAIR BASKETBALL COURTS 

ALSO: ROWDY CONTEST! $25.00 CASH FOR 
ROWDIEST GROUP OF 5 OR MORE. 



suiting in the big play. 

In the first half Qarion's of- 
fense struggled against Cali- 
fornia's defense, which 
entered the game rated first in 
the PSAC West. At the half the 
Golden Eagle running game 
had managed just 21 yards on 
11 attempts. 

Although Emminger com- 
pleted some nice passes, 
things were also tough in the 
air against the Vulcans' ag- 



Morrissey returned the 
kickoff 31 yards to the Qarion 
37, it was then that he and the 
Golden Eagle offense began 
its resurgence. Led by the of- 
fensive front of Pat Prenatt, 
John Seaman, Jerry Fedell, 
Larry Weisenbach and Tim 
"Bundy" Lindenbaum, Mor- 
rissey began to tear off huge 
chunks of yardage. Morrissey 
became the Golden Eagles' 
work-horse in a nine-play 63- 
yard scoring drive. He carried 



gressive blitzing style six times for 46 yards along 
defense. The only iwints put the drive that ended with an 
on the board by the Golden 11-yard TD pass from Em- 
Eagles came on a 28-yard field minger to Clarion's top 
goal by Clarion kicker Phil receiver Ron Urbansky. 
Bujakowski. Morrissey finished the 

California, meanwhile, was game with 133 yards on 16 car- 
being led by fleet-footed fresh- ries and one touchdown, while 
man quarterback Sam Urbansky had 5 grabs for 92 
Mannery. Mannery had been yards and the one score, 
troubled in his first three In the fourth quarter Qar- 
games as a coUegiate throw- ion tailback Ken Dworek com- 
ing four interceptions. In the pleted a perfect halfback pass 
first quarter, however, Man- to Urbansky for a 46-yard pick 
nery looked like a seasoned up to the Cal 44. Two plays 
veteran. He marched the Vul- later however, the drive 
cans on a 15-play 91-yard drive stalled as Tony Giavedoni, a 
that resulted in a three-yard backup Clarion receiver, fum- 
touchdown pass from Man- bled after making an 18-yard 
nery to tight end Terry O'Shea catch, Vulcan defensive back 
to give California a 7-0 lead. Mark Martin recovered the 

"Hie key play along the drive ball, 

was Mannery's ability to run, When the Clarion offense 

twice scrambling for 13-yard got the ball back Morrissey 

gains. The second run being started the game-winnmg 

for a first down on a 4th and 8 drive breaking a 34-yard draw 

from the Qarion 34. play. The fourth down pass to 

With four seconds left in the Hastings and the one-yard TD 

half Emminger hit Hastings run by Morrissey helped Clar- 

down the middle for a 34-yard ion to a 17-14 lead that they 

gain. Hastings, who totaled would never relinquish. The 

four catches for 112 yards, winning drive was eight plays 

was hit hard and fumbled, for 73 yards. 

California defensive back Although Qarion out-gained 

Mike Grashion recovered at California 422 to 186 in total 

the four. yards the game was held close 

California ran out the clock because of Golden Eagle mis- 

and took a 7-3 lead into the takes. Clarion committed 

locker room at the half. three turnovers and was 

The second half started like called for 10 penalties for 73 

the first, the Qarion offense yards, but for the second week 

sputtered, and the Vulcans re- ' '^ " - - 
turned a Bujakowski punt to 
the CUP 49. A late hit added 15 
more yards onto the return 
and two plays later Clarion 
whistled for another 15 



was 



in a row the Golden Eagles 
had enough talent to 
overcome their mistakes. 
Last week versus Ferris St. 
Clarion had five turnovers. 
The win gave the Golden 



yards and ttie Vulcans had the Eagles a good start in PSAC 
ball on tiie Golden Eagle 14. play making them 1-0, and 
The mistakes went on to hurt moving them to 2-1 overall. 

This week Clarion caps 
Autumn Leaf Week by hosting 
Slippery Rock who is also 1-0 
in PSAC play after a 36-35 vic- 
tory over Emnboro last week. 



Clarion as Vulcan fullback 
Steve Brown later dove over 
from one yard out giving Cal a 
14-3 advantage. 
Following the score Sean 



''0. 



RED STALLION 

TONITE ^ 

Super A.LF. Party 

Reduced Genny 7 ozs. 
Prizes and Giveaways! ! 




^0, 



oe 



J! 



From th e Che ap Seats 



by Robert DiDomenico 

Sports Staff Writer 

It was approximately 3:15 on 
the Sunday that didn't count. I 
was flipping through the chan- 
nels, not satisfied with anything I 
could find, whether it was aques- 
trian racing on ESPN, Auto 
Racing on USA, the Pirates/Mets 
game on WOR or the insipid 
repeat of the Super Bore XXI. I 
had reached the point of severe 
nausea when I hit a channel that 
had an interview with NFLPA 
president Gene Upshaw. An 
impulsive, unmistakable thought 
came to my head. 

Who cares?! Who the 

cares?! The players' union cry 
for unrestricted free agency is 
absurd. There's no way the 
owners will give in to that idea. 
With unrestricted free agency, 
players can move to the team of 
their choice when their contract 
runs out. Draft picks will want 
shorter-term contracts so they 
can move to a different team in 
the primes of their careers. This 
will cause holdouts which ruin the 
game almost as much as strikes. 
And add to this the fact that unre- 
stricted free agency will cause 
bidding wars, which will cause a 
preposterous NFL average 
salary increase. 

If teams field scab replace- 
ments, the owners will still make 
a huge profit. The scabs' salaries 
are next to nothing, but the own- 
ers still receive their TV revenue 
and season ticket revenue. The 
owners won't care if anyone 
watches or comes to the games 
and neither do I. I have no sym- 
pathy for the striking players, 
especially when they're in a sit- 
uation which they can't win. 

To prove the point, the Pre-em- 
inent One has switched the con- 



centration of his vast expertise to 
the more rah-rah world of college 
football. College football. College 
ball possesses the more fun and 
innocent aspects of the game: 
geographical rivalries, big 
crowds, co-ed cheerleaders, mas- 
cots and the players can't strike! 
I should have started picking 
college ball last week, when there 
were some big early season show- 
downs: Auburn-Tennessee, LSU- 
Ohio St., Nebraska-Arizona St., 
Penn St.-Boston College, and Mi- 
ami-Arkansas. Here are some 
thoughts on the young college 
season: 

-The Southeastern Conference 
is playing the best football this 
year. LSU, Auburn, Florida, Ten- 
nessee, and Alabama are all 
ranked and Kentucky isn't far be- 
hind. 

-Clemson definitely looks like 
an early-season National Cham- 
pionship contender. The Atlantic 
Coast Conference is outright sad 
and the Tigers have only two 
more road games. 

-If Clemson isn't playing for the 
title against either Oklahoma or 
Nebraska in the Orange Bowl, 
they could be playing against 
Miami in the Fiesta Bowl. Re- 
member where you heard that 
first. It was the Pre-eminent One 
who first predicted a Miami-Penn 
State Fiesta Bowl championship 
game last year. 

Enough of my absurd soap-box 
babbling, here are the 
predictions: 

PITT over BOSTON COLLEGE: 
Although I'm impressed with BC 
QB Mike Power, I thmk the Ea- 
gles are demoralized after 
playing their hearts out only to 
lose to Penn St. It could hurt the 
rest of their season. 

PENN ST. over TEMPLE: The 



Lions aren't the team of last 
year, but their rushing attack 
may be better. They should roll 
over teams the caliber of Temple. 

LSU over FLORIDA: The 
Snake Pit in Baton Rouge is al- 
ways tough on SFC opponents. 
The Gators are improved with 
freshman RB Emmett Smith, but 
the LSU defense should man- 
handle the pourous Florida offen- 
sive line. 

MIAMI over FLORIDA ST.: 
The Seminoles always play the 
Hurricanes tough at home, but 
the 'Canes have the NCAA's best 
road record over the last four 
years and they really flexed their 
muscles against then 10th ranked 
Arkansas. 

OKLAHOMA over IOWA ST. 
The Sooners vanilla pudding 
schedule should make it easy for 
them to stay #1 until their show- 
down with Nebraska. 

NEBRASKA over SOUTH CAR- 
OLINA: The Huskers have beat- 
en two really tough teams in 
UCLA and Arizona St. and should 
be ranked #1 (do you hear that 
Barry "Tulsa's toi^ this year ! " 
Switzer) 

UCLA over STANFORD: The 
Bruins were overrated when the 
pre-season pollsters ranked them 
#2 but they'll dominate here. 

TEXAS TECH over TEXAS A 
& M: My upset of the week, and 
they always come true. 

OHIO ST. over ILLINOIS: The 
Buckeyes were methodical and 
sluggish and still managed to tie 
tough LSU on the road. They 
should dominate the Big Ten. 

NORTH CAROLINA over AU- 
BURN: Another upset special. I 
just can't get into Auburn as a 
passing team, and their new of- 
fensive style could burn them 
against the Tar Heels. 



THE CLARION CALL, Clarion, PA, Thursday, Oct. 1, 1987-21 

PSAC races 
heating up 



The PSAC (Pennsylvania 
State Athletic Conference) 
Eastern and Western Divi- 
sion races are beginning to 
heat up. After the first week- 
end of divisional contests last 
Saturday, a number of im- 
portant games dot the PSAC 
schedule this Saturday as the 
second week of divisional ac- 
tion gets underway. 

A total of 3 divisional con- 
tests are set to be played in 
both the East and the West, 
as well as one inter-division- 
al matchup. 

In the East, defending 
champion WEST CHESTER 
(1-0) is on the road for the se- 
cond week in a row, this Sat- 
urday at KUTZTOWN (0-0). 
MILLERSVILLE (1-0) 
travels to CHEYNEY (0-1), 
while BLOOMSBURG (0-1) 
hits the road to visit EAST 
STROUDSBURG (0-l>. 

In the West, defending 
PSAC Champion INDIANA 
(0-0), travels to EDINBORO 
(0-1), while SLIPPERY 
ROCK (1-0) travels down 1-80 
to do battle at CLARION (1- 
0), and CALIFORNIA (0-1) 
visits LOCK HAVEN (0-1). 

The lone inter-divisional 
contest has MANSFIELD at 
SHIPPENSBURG. 

In last Saturday's Eastern 
Division games, defending 
champ West Chester dropped 
Bloomsburg 39-14, while Mil- 
lersville edged East Strouds- 
burg 31-27 and Mansfield 



Agents should be punished 



nipped Cheyney 6-5. 

In the West, Clarion slid 
past California 17-14, Slip- 
pery Rock outlasted 
Edinboro 36-35 and Shippens- 
burg defeated Lock Haven 
22-15. 

The PSAC "Players of the 
Week" were Bob Brown of 
Slippery Rock in the West, 
and Mike Beamish of Mans- 
field in the East. 

Brown, a 5-7, 180-pound, 
sophomore, wide receiver 
from Farrell, led Slippery 
Rock to a 36-35 victory over 
Edinboro. Brown caught a 
seven-yard touchdown pass, 
returned a punt 52-yarcls for 
a Rocket touchdown in the 
fourth quarter that turned 
the momentum around, then 
on the game's final play, 
blocked Edinboro's 22-yard 
field goal attempt to pre- 
serve victory for the 
Rockets. The punt block also 
earned the PSAC "Play of 
the Week" honors. 

Beamish, a 5-11, 217-pound, 
senior, linebacker from Ro- 
chester, N.Y., led the Mans^ 
field University defense in 
the Mountaineers 6-5 win 
over Cheyney. Beamish 
garnered 12 tackles, 2 tackles 
for a loss and recovered a 
fumble in giving Mansfield 
its PSAC-Eastern Division 
victory. 

(Story courtesy of PSAC-SID Rich 
Herman). 



(CPS)— Retaliating for the 
loss of All-American receiver 
Cris Carter to his beloved Ohio 
State University football 
team, state legislator John P. 
Stozich has introduced a biU 
that would punish sports 
agents for getting college ath- 
letes in trouble. 

"The player is punished, the 
coach is punished, the school 
is punished, but the agent re- 
sponsible is not," said Stozich. 

Carter — as well as players 
from three other schools — al- 
legedly took money from 
sports agents Norby Walters 
and Lloyd Bloom, apparently 
for letting the agents 
represent them when the 
players eventually leave 
college and turn professional. 

When allegations that Wal- 
ters and Bloom paid them — a 
move that violates National 
Collegiate Athletic Associa- 
tion (NCAA) rules for main- 
taining students' amateur sta- 
tus — arose, the schools sus- 
pended the athletes from furth- 
erj!oUeeiatQ comoetition. 

Many football coaches sub- 
sequently have banned all or 
most agents from their prac- 



tice fields. 

In Ohio, Stozich introduced 
what would be the nation's 
toughest law restricting the 
agents' activities and setting 
stringent penalties for "ruth- 
less" and "disreputable" re- 
cruiters. 

If enacted, the Stozich bill 
will require professional 
sports agents to be licensed by 
the state. The agent, for ex- 
ample, can lose the license 



for: 

Inducing an athlete to agree 
to a contract with a sports 
agent or professional team 
b&ore the athlete's college eli- 
gibility ends. 

Offering anything of value 
to a campus employee for re- 
ferring a student athlete to the 
agent. 

The agent could also forfeit 
a $25,000 security bond posted 
when the agent applies for 



licessing, pay a fine of up to 
$10,000 and compensate each 
injured person. 



Stozich added the NCAA's 
reaction to his bill was "very 
positive." 





22-THE CLARION CALL, Clarion, PA, Thursday, Oct. 1, 1987 



Despite bad weather 

Spirits higli on tennis team 



by Ron Bollinger, 
Sports Staff Writer 



Despite rain and cold tem- 

Beratures, the Clarion 
niversity women's tennis 
team kept their spirits high 
and their forearms strong, as 
they posted a 7-0 victory in 
the first round of tournament 
play at lUP. Bleak weather 
and torrents of rain forced 
cancellation of the rest of the 
tournament. 

Although no team winner 
was announced, the victory 
with 5 singles wins and 2 byes 
was important in ranking of 
teams for the state champion- 
ship. Winning singles matches 
for the team were: Lisa War- 
ren, Susie Fritz, Amanda Bell, 
Tammy Myers, and Lori 
Kahn. 

On Tuesday, Sept. 22, the 
Qarion University women's 
tennis team was again victor- 
ious over Westminster 6-0 be- 
fore rain wiped out the re- 
maining doubles matches. 

Posting wins for the team 
were: No. 1 Lisa Warren 
devastating Beth Natel W), 6- 
0. No. 2 Susie Fritz handling 
Connie Daub &4, 6-1. No. 3 
Amanda BeU dominating over 
Jennifer Leach 6-1, 6^. No. 4 
Tammy Myers defeating Joy 



Benson 6-2, 6-1. No. 5, Lori 
Kahn getting by Nicki Wildes 
6-5, 7-5. No. 6 Carolyn Val- 
lecorsa over Marge Blewett 6- 
1,6-2. 

Winning the Golden 
Eaglette award, an award 
based on performance and at- 
titude, was Lisa Warren who 
dominated her whole match 
and played a very sharp game 
of tennis. Coach Baschnagel 
said, "The team played well 
and to its potential, but some 
work is still needed on the 
fundamentals." 

Tlus win over Westminster 
boosts the team's season 
record to 3-0. 

On Friday, Sept. 25, the 
Lady Golden Eagle tennis 
team once again remained un- 
defeated grinding down Gan- 
non 9^. The Lady Eagles took 
command of the matches 
early and continued to domin- 
ate throughout the match. 

Scoring wins for the team 
were: No. 1. L. Warren vs. K. 
Collins 6-1, 6-2. No. 2, S. Fritz 
vs. D. Covalik 7-5, 6-0. No. 3, A. 
BeU vs. M. Kippley 6-3, 6-1. 
No. 4, T. Myers vs. L. Keselow 
&-3, 6-1. No. 5 L. Kahn vs. T. 
Abate 64), 64). No. 6, C. Val- 
lecorsa vs. L. Sonntag 6-2, 4-6, 




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6-2. Winners in the doubles 
matches were: No. 1, Warren 
and Fritz vs. Collins and Cova- 
lik 6-0, 6-2. No. 2, Myers and 
Kahn vs. Kippley and Keselow 
64, 6-1. No. 3, Bell and Mc- 
Adams vs. Sonntag and Ross 
6-0, 6-1. Coach Baschnagel 
was pleased with the perform- 
ance of the team, but says, 
''Some basic fundamentals 
still need improvement, and 
the lobs have to be deeper." 
Winning the Giolden Eaglette 
award for the Gannon match 
were Debbie McAdams and 
Jane Bejider for their fine per- 
formance and leadership at- 
titudes. 

On Saturday, Sept. 26, the 
Golden Eagle tennis team 
scored yet another impressive 
victory be destroying Mercy- 
hurst 9-0. 

TTie Match was the team's 
toughest test of their ability 
according to Coach Baschna- 
gel. Posting tough, yet decis- 



ive wins for Qarion were: No. 
1, L. Warren vs. J. Holzhaues- 
ser 4^, 7-6, 7-4 tiebreaker, 6-2. 

No. 2, S. Fritz vs S. Cefola 6- 
3, 6-1, No. 3, A. Bell vs. D. 
Cefola 6^, frO. No. 4, T. Myers 
vs. A. Sturm 6-0, 6-2. No. 5, L. 
Kahn vs. J. Kemling 6-0, 6-0. 
No. 6, C. Vallecorsa vs. M. 
McKenna 6-1, 6-2. Doubles 
winners included No. 1 
Warren and Fritz vs D. Cefola 
and Holzhauesser 6-1, 6-2. No. 
2 Myers and Kahn vs S. Cefola 
and Sturm 6-1, 6-3. No. 3 Bell 
and McAdams vs. J. Wohlher 
and Walsh 64), 6^. This match 
proved to be the most produc- 
tive as far as hard work and 
skillful ability. 

Coach Baschnagel was very 
pleased with how well the dou- 
bles teams played together. 
TWs match was the hardest 
personally for Lisa Warren 
wiio came back from a first 
set deficit to rally for a victory 
thus remaining undefeated in 



her career at C.U.P. 

Winning the Golden 
Eaglette award for the Mercy- 
hurst match were Tammy 
Myers and Lori Kahn. 

TTiis victory for the team 
boosts their season record to 5- 
0. Overall for year the team 
has posted a 50^ record in in- 
dividual and doubles play, 
with a winning streak of 19 
consecutive matches. 

The next home match will 
be Thursday against Lock 
Haven. 
TENNIS NOTES: 

Anyone interested in parti- 
cipating in the 4th annual Aut- 
umn Leaf Festival tennis tour- 
nament? The event will be 
held this Friday, Saturday, 
and Sunday. The deadline for 
signing up is Thursday, Octo- 
b&r 1st. Tiiere will be nine diff- 
erent events including mixed 
doubles. Interested persons 
should contact Coach 
Baschnagel at 105 Tippen. 



Volleyball team has trouble 



by Susan Kurtz, 
Sports Staff Writer 



ITie Clarion women's vol- 
leyball team was met with 
defeat at the Malone College 
tournament. 

Coach Cindy Opalski said, 
"We are a team that has not 
yet peaked. At this time last 
year we had peaked and con- 
tinued downward. Certain 
factors of the offensive and de- 
fensive play need to be worked 
out. Through this tournament 
we were able to see what 
areas we need to work on. " 

llie first match against Ma- 
lone started off slowly but the 
Lady Eagles pulled together 



and won in four games 8-15, 15- 
8,l&-13,15-7. 

"I was very pleased with 
the way this match turned 
around, said Opalski. "Sue 
Holcombe came off the bench, 
having just recovered from an 
injury and became a key play- 
er in this match," commented 
Opalski. 

Barb Buck and Tammy 
Wolfe led the team with seven 
kills each in tiiis match. Missy 
O'Rourke was setting at a 97% 
efficiency rate. 

The next match against 
Ashland College was not as 
successful for the lady netters. 
They were defeated in three 
games, 15-17, 8-15, 9-15. 



"Our serving game was 
very poor," commented Opal- 
ski. ''Had we been serving 
well we would have beaten 
this team. We had 12 service 
errors throughout this 
match," said Opalski. 

Buck had the most kills thus 
far this season for a single 
match with nine kills, leading 
the match. 

Carrie Hawley followed 
with seven kills. Opalski feels 
that Hawley is very beneficial 
at the net because of her con- 
sistency. 

Overall Opalski feels that 
this team knows they can play 
better, but have to stop mak- 
ing unforced errors. 




In Homecoming game 



THE CLARION CALL, Clarion, PA, Thursday, Oct. 1, 1987-23 



FINISHING Golden Eagle runner Steve Willianis finishes his run as a Lock Haven runner trails him home. The 

Golden Eagles are undefeated in 1987. Photo by Steve Butrl, Staff Photographer 



Clarion hosts "The Rock" 



After coming from behind to 
defeat California 17-14 on the 
road last Saturday, the Clar- 
ion University football team 
returns home this Saturday to 
host Slippery Rock in a pivotal 
PSAC-Western Division 
matchup. Game time at 
Clarion's Memorial Stadium 
is set for 2 p.m., which is also 
serving as Clarion's 1987 
Homecoming game. 

Clarion enters the game 
with a 2-1 overall record and a 
1-0 slate in the PSAC-Western 
Division. The Golden Eagles 
opened the season with a 14-8 
loss against Fairmont State, 
but rebounded for two road 
victories at Ferris State (34- 
13) and at California (17-14) 
under fifth year head coach 
Gene Sobolewski. 

Slippery Rock, led by in- 
terim head coach Bob DiSpir- 
ito, enters Saturday's tilt with 
a 2-2 overall record and a 1-0 
slate in the PSAC-Western Di- 
vision. The Rockets opened 
1987 with a 37-14 loss at Hills- 
dale, then defeated Central 
Connecticut 17-16, lost at home 
against New Haven (24-16), 
but rebounded last Saturday 
to upset Edinboro 36-35. 
DiSpirito, who coached the 
Rockets for 14 seasons (1967- 
80) and led the Rockets to 
three straight PSAC Titles in 
1972, 73, 74, resigned prior to 
the 1981 football season after 
suffering a heart attack in 
March of that year. After six 
seasons out of football, DiSpir- 
ito returned when former 
head coach Don Ault resigned 
in June. DiSpirito entered the 
1987 season with a career rec- 
ord of 75-54-3. 

"I think Bob has done a very 
good job coaching his team in 
1987," praised Clarion's Sobo- 
lewski. "This is a traditional 
Bob DiSpirito, Slippery Rock 
team. Well coached, playing 
sound fundamental football 
and making the important 
plays when they are neces- 
sary. The Rock has a very 
good running attack, but can 
hurt you with the pass. Pater- 
ra (Greg) is a good runner 
and we'll need to slow him 
down. They have used multiple 
defensive sets this season, but 
they are a strong, physical 
type team and we had better 
be ready for a tough game. I 
think Slippery Rock will be 
very high for us on Saturday, 
especialy coming off that ex- 
citing win over Edinboro. It 
will be an outstanding home- 
coming game and we hope we 
have a big crowd behind us at 
Memorial Stadium," added 
the veteran Clarion coach. 

Clarion is averaging 19.7 
points per game in 1987, while 
gaining 342.3 yards of total of- 
fense per game. The Eagles 
have gone over 400 yards of of- 



fense in each of the last two 
games and are now averaging 
113.0 yards rushing and 229.3 
yards passing per game. The 
"0" is led by senior quarter- 
back Doug Emminger. 
Enmiinger, who missed the 
season opener, has connected 
on 36 of 63 passes for 582 yards 
and 4 td's. His main targets 
passing the pigskin have been 
flanker Ron Urbansky, split 
end Mike Brestensky, wideout 
Tony Giavedoni, and tight end 
Dan Hastings. 

The Eagles got their first 
100 plus rushing performance 
last Saturday as tailback Sean 
Morrissey gained 133 yards 
and scored a td on 16 carries. 
Morrissey currently has toted 
the pigskin 41 times for 213 
yards and 1 td. Also carrying 
the ball are tailback Ken 
Dworek and fullbacks Keith 
Powell and Mick Kehoe. 

The Rockets are jielding 
322.2 yards per game, while 
also giving up an average of 
28.0 points per game. On the 
ground the Rockets are giving 
up 159.0 yards, while yielding 
163.2 yards per game passing. 
Up front the Rock is led by 
1986 all-conference performer 
Tom Kerr, along with tackles 
Nate Gay and Mike Campbell. 
The micidle of the Rocket 5-2 
defense shows quality in Rich 
Moskal and Jerome Curtis at 
linebacker. The secondary 
features the play of Gary 
Barnes and 1986 all-confer- 
ence selection Donovan 
Wright. 

Slippery Rock's offense fea- 
tures a balanced attack, 
which is getting 167.8 yards 
per game on the ground and 
133.0 through the air, for a 
total offensive output of 300.8 
yards per game. Tlie Rock of- 
fense is directed by senior 
quarterback Steve Statnick, 
who has completed 39 of 80 
passes for 532 yards and 4 td's. 
He has been intercepted 11 
times. His main passing 
target has been slot-back Jim 
Carr, who leads PSAC-West 
receivers with 5.3 receptions 
per game. Carr has caught 21 
aerials for 268 yards and 3 
td's. Tight end Brian Koontz 
has 4 catches for 65 yards and 
Greg Paterra has 5 grabs for 
38 yards. 

The Rocket running game, a 
trademark of the Rockets, is 
flourishing again behind Greg 
Paterra. The 1986 PSAC-West 
Co-Rookie of the Year, Pa- 
terra this season has gained 
418 yards on 96 carries, while 
scoring three td's. Paterra 
leads ttie PSAC-West rushers 
gaining 104.5 yards per game. 
Carr, from his slot-back spot, 
has 69 yards in 14 carries. 

TTie Qarion defense is now 
ranked number one in total 



defense in the PSAC-Western 
Division. The Golden Eagles 
are giving up 239.7 yards of of- 
fense per game, including 83.7 
rushing and 156.0 passing. 
Certainly the Rockets running 
game will be a big test up 
front for the Eagles. After 
sitting out the first game with 
an injury, defensive tackle 
Lou Weiers has posted 19 tack- 
les and 3 qb sacks. He will be 
joined up front this Saturday 
by tackles Mark Kelly, Tim 
Shook and Jeff Gutter. Nose- 
guards Mark Jones and Jim 
Keller will augment the line. 

Clarion defensive ends Tom 
Anderson and Bob Vernick 
are expected to start. Vernick 
missed the California game, 
but will return. 

In the middle of Qarion's 5-2 
defense, the linebacking play 
of Ken Raabe and Dan Taylor 
have been solid. Raabe, who 
was a first team all-confer- 
ence selection in 1986, has 
posted a team leading 45 tack- 
les in only 3 games. Taylor 
meanwhile has 29 stops. 

The secondary will likely 
have James Rachel and John 
Besic at the comers, along 
with Bob Kelly at free safety. 
Strong safety Steve Frank is 
questionable with an injury, 



and if unable to perform, will 
be replaced by veteran John 
Peterman. Rachel has 26 hits, 
Besic 25 stops and two broken- 
up passes, Kelly has 26 
tackles, while Frank has 13 
stops and Peterman 19 hits. 

Phil Bujakowski continues 
his solid specialty play. "Buj" 
has kicked four of four PAT's 
and three of three field goals 



for a total of 13 points. In ad- 
dition, Phil is averaging 41.5 
yards per punt, second overall 
in the entire PSAC. 

CLARION NOTES: The 
Golden Eagles will be at In- 
diana next Saturday, then 
return home for two home 
games in a row. . .October 17 
against Edinboro and October 
24 vs East Stroudsburg. 




IMPORTANT ENCOUNTER. 

Saturday. 



.The Golden Eagles will battle "The Rock" this 
Clarion Call File Photo 



UNIV • BOOK • CENTER 




R 

E 
A 

T 
E 



S 
H 
I 
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UNIV • BOOK • CENTER 



24-THE CLARION CALL, Clarion, PA, Thursday, Oct. 1, 1987 



Sports Spotlight... onBarbBuck 



By Michael A. Sexauer 
Asst. Sports Editor 



Barb Buck has littie time 
for things other than volley- 
ball and school work. She does, 
however, fair extremely well 
at both endeavors. 

Buck, a senior from Baden, 
Pa., was the same way at Am- 
bridge High School. Concent- 
tration on little other than vol- 
leyball and academics got 
Buck recruited to Clarion on a 
Volleyball Scholarship. 



After earning a 4.0 for her 
Freshman year, Barb 
received an academic 
scholarship to accompany the 
one for volleyball. 

As a Speech Pathology/ 
Audiology Major, Buck begins 
her Senior year with a 3.78 
QPA; making Dean's list all 
but one semester. 

With an outstanding QPA 
and fantastic game percen- 
tages. Buck hopes to repeat 
the nomination to Academic 
All-American that she 



received in 1985. 

Buck's stats for the 1986 sea- 
son earned her a position on 
the PSAC All Regional Team. 

"I'm not a great player," 
says Buck, "when I go up to 
make a kill, people don't go 
'OOH! '. But I am consistent." 

The Lady Netters Team 
Captain has had her share of 
injuries. 

During her Sophomore 
year. Barb suffered from tre- 
mendously painful leg 
cramps. A trip to Hamot 




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Sports Medicine Center in 
Erie revealed poor bone 
structure in her legs. 

The condition is incurable 
and will bother her indefinite- 
ly. Also during her Sophomore 
year, Barb seriously sprained 
her ankle during a Regional 
Tournament. 

Buck became Team 
Captain at the beginning of the 
off season last February. 

Tlie off season is almost as 
busy as the Fall playing 
season. Lifting, running, jump 
training and off season 
tournaments keep the Lady 
Netters in shape. 

Buck is going to remain at 
Qarion University after her 
graduation in May of '88. Barb 



will pursue a Master's Degree 
in Audiology. She doesn't 
know if there will be time 
enough to be active with the 
team, but if her studies allow. 
Buck would like to help out. 

Buck considers herself an 
"all around" player. She likes 
and plays the most at outside 
hitter. 

A personal goal for Buck 
this season is to become a 
better defensive player. 

The Women's Volleyball 
Team has had an impressive 
(undefeated) year so far. 
Buck attributes this to the 
team as a whole. This year's 
team "Has the most talent" 
on it since Barb's first year at 
Qarion. 




BARB BUCK 
Clarion University Volleyball Player 

Photo by Mike Bordo, Photography Editor 





SPORTS CALENDAR 


" 


OCTOBER 1 THROUGH 7 


1 

3 


Tennis vs. Lock Haven (H) 3 p.m. 
HOIVIECOMING DAY 


6 


Football vs. The Rock (H) 2 p.m. 
Men's & Women's X-Country Alumni Meet (H) 11 am 
Volleyball at California with Waynesburg 
Tennis at Indiana 




Volleyball vs. Allegheny with UPJ (H) 7 p.m. 



1987 Autumn Leaf Festival Edition 



Public Safety Patrol stepped up on ALF 



by Andrea Yuhasz, 
News Staff Writer 



Do alcohol related incidents 
increase during Homecom- 
ing? According to John Postel- 
wait, Director of Public Safe- 
ty, "There is a noticable in- 
crease in alcohol violations 
and alcohol related inci- 
dents." Although Postelwait 



Vol. 59 No. 5 



does not have a percentage 
figure of exactly how much of 
an increase there is during the 
Autumn Leaf - Homecoming 
weekend, he does know that 
officers are much busier 
during that weekend. 

Tliere are two major con- 
tributors to Public Safety's 
busy schedule. One is an in- 



creased number of people in 
the area, the other is an in- 
crease in activity during the 
weekend. To cope with the sit- 
uation, there are more officers 
on duty. Reauests for time off 
are not usually granted during 
Homecoming. Also, officers 
are more alert for problems. 

The football game is the big- 
gest concern because general- 



ly there are a large number of 
people in attendance who are 
uncfer the influence of alcohol. 
However, Postelwait reports 
that the last three to four 
years have been relatively 
calm. Another problem that 
Public Safety must face is 
vandalism. The most common 
targets for abuse on campus 
are lights, windows, and oc- 



casionally cars. 

So as not to give the impres- 
sion that all arrests and cita- 
tions involve students, Postel- 
wait points out, "There are 
about an equal number of stu- 
dents and non-students in- 
volved in incidents. Usually, 
the non-students are involved 
in alcohol-related incidents. 



Thursday, Oct. 8, 1987 



The 



LARION 



rAii 



ClaxLon LLniuE'i±ity of ip£nni.yLuania 



Kapu snik sentenced to 60 days 



by Deborah M. Schofield, 
Editor in Chief 



SPORTS TIP 



CALL 

2380 



handed down to John Michael Judge Paul B. Greiner. 

— Kapusnik Monday for a sim- Kapusnik, a former CUP 

A 60-day jail sentence was P^e assault charge by Senior student from Natrona 
■■■^"■■■^"■'^■■""^ Heights, was found guilty of 

one count of simple assault 
following a fight with his girl- 
friend November 16 outside a 
Main Street pizza parlor. 

The jail sentence included 
29 days already served by Ka- 
pusnik before bail was 
granted last December, and 
eligibility for work release. 
The sentence will be served in 
the Clarion County Jail begin- 
ning tomorrow or Saturday. 

Kapusnik was also placed 
on probation for one year (to 
run concurrent with the jail 
term), and ordered to pay a 
$300 fine and court costs. 

The former U.S. Marine 
was accused of stabbing two 
CUP students when they inter- 
rupted the fight between Ka- 
pusnik and his former girl- 
friend last November. One 
student died. 

Judge Merle E. Wiser dis- 
missed homicide and ag- 
gravated assault charges 
against Kapusnik, 23, May 18 
Mter halting the trial before 
the defense began its presen- 
tation. Wiser granted the de- 
fenses' request for a demurrer 
saying that Clarion County 
District Attorney William 
Kern failed to disprove two 
possible defenses to the crime. 

"The court made what they 
felt was an appropriate deci- 
sion," said Defense Attorney 
Tom Ceraso after the sentenc- 
ing. He doesn't plan to appeal 
the decision. 




MAIN STREET, U.SA . . .Alive with activity during ALF, Saturday's Main 
Street Is full of clowns, shoppers, spectators, and food lovers tasting 1987's 
'®"*'^**y- Photo by Mlk9 Bordo. Photography Editor 



^ 



PEIRCE WEEKiNO WEATHER 

Ci^r and mfld • M's In 50*1 
io*sintlMfnM-^s 



Kapusnik's sentencing was 
one of 29 in the Clarion Q)unty 
Courtroom Monday. 

Greiner, 71, was a guest 
judge replacing Wiser for 
Monday's sentencings, ap- 
parently restricting Wiser's 
involvement in Clarion Coun- 
ty criminal cases. 

Kern began the proceedings 
by asking Greiner to take into 
consideration the chain of 
events that happened after the 
assault occurred when sen- 
tencing Kapusnik. 

Ceraso protested Kern's re- 
quest saying, "It integrates 
facts into the situation that 
have no effect on the simple 
assault charges. He went on to 
say there was "nothing out of 
the ordinary about the sen- 
tencing," and Kapusnik's job, 
home life, and clean record 
since the incident should be 
taken into consideration. 
"(Kapusnik) has not had any 
problems since the event oc- 
curred." Ceraso concluded by 
saying the charge was only a 

"Kapusnik has not had 
any problems since the 
event occurred." 

—Tom Ceraso 

simple assault charge 
between girlfriend and boy- 
friend, and asked for nothing 
greater for his client than pro- 
bation. 

Greiner questioned Kapus- 
nik about his one-time contact 
with his former girlfriend and 




JOHN MICHAEL KAPUSNIK 

Clarion Call File Photo 

victim, then ordered that 
Kapusnik have "no contact 
whatsoever with the victim." 
Ceraso assurred Greiner that 
contact was a one-time occur- 
rence and not for the purpose 
of renewing that relationship. 

Kern, Ceraso, and Jack 
Lowe, coKiouncil for Kapusnik, 
were in conference oefore 
Greiner's bench for nearly 35 
minutes before Kapusnik was 
sentenced. 

Simple assault is a second- 
degree misdemeanor. 

Kapusnik could have faced 
up to two years in jail and 
fines totaling $5,000. He has 30 
days to appeal the decision. 



Two Seniors Sti^ 
"Greater Tuna" 

Features — Page 13 



Gridders 19th 
In Div. li Poll 

SpoHs — PageZl 



No more Little Sisters 
at CUP 

News — Page 5 



24-THE CLARION CALL. Clarion, PA, Thursday, Oct. 1, 1987 



Sports Spotlight... onBarbSuck 



1987 Autumn Leaf Festival Edition 



By Michael A. Sexauer 
Asst. Sports Editor 



Barb Buck has little time 
for things other than volley- 
ball and school work. She does, 
however, fair extremely well 
at both endeavors. 

Buck, a senior from Baden, 
Pa., was the same way at Am- 
bridge High School. Concent- 
tration on little other than vol- 
leyball and academics got 
Buck recruited to Clarion on a 
Volleyball Scholarship. 



After earning a 4.0 for her 
Freshman year, Barb 
received an academic 
scholarship to accompany the 
one for volleyball. 

As a Speech Pathology/ 
Audiology Major, Buck begins 
her Senior year with a 3.78 
QPA; making Dean's list all 
but one semester. 

With an outstanding QPA 
and fantastic game percen- 
tages, Buck hopes to repeat 
the nomination to Academic 
All-American that she 



received in 1985. 

Buck's stats for the 1986 sea- 
son earned her a position on 
the PSAC All Regional Team. 

"I'm not a great player," 
says Buck, "when I go up to 
make a kill, people don't go 
'OOH! '. But I am consistent." 

The Lady Netters Team 
Captain has had her share of 
injuries. 

During her Sophomore 
year, Barb suffered from tre- 
mendously painful leg 
cramps. A trip to Hamot 




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Sports Medicine Center in 
Erie revealed poor bone 
structure in her legs. 

The condition is incurable 
and will bother her indefinite- 
ly. Also during her Sophomore 
year, Barb seriously sprained 
her ankle during a Regional 
Tournament. 

Buck became Team 
Captain at the beginning of the 
off season last February. 

The off season is almost as 
busy as the Fall playing 
season. Lifting, running, jump 
training and off season 
tournaments keep the Lady 
Netters in shape. 

Buck is going to remain at 
Clarion University after her 
graduation in May of '88. Barb 



will pursue a Master's Degree 
in Audiology. She doesn't 
know if there will be time 
enough to be active with the 
team, but if her studies allow. 
Buck would like to help out. 

Buck considers herself an 
"all around" player. She likes 
and plays the most at outside 
hitter. 

A personal goal for Buck 
this season is to become a 
better defensive player. 

The Women's Volleyball 
Team has had an impressive 
(undefeated) year so far. 
Buck attributes this to the 
team as a whole. This year's 
team "Has the most talent" 
on it since Barb's first year at 
Clarion. 



Public Safety Patrol stepped up on ALF 



by Andrea Yuhasz, 
News Staff Writer 



Do alcohol related incidents 
increase during Homecom- 
ing? According to John Postel- 
wait, Director of Public Safe- 
ty, "There is a noticable in- 
crease in alcohol violations 
and alcohol related inci- 
dents." Although Postelwait 



Vol. 59 No. 5 



does not have a percentage 
figure of exactly how much of 
an increase there is during the 
Autumn Leaf - Homecoming 
weekend, he does know that 
officers are much busier 
during that weekend. 

There are two major con- 
tributors to Public Safety's 
busy schedule. One is an in- 



creased number of people in 
the area, the other is an in- 
crease in activity during the 
weekend. To cope with the sit- 
uation, there are more officers 
on duty. Requests for time off 
are not usually granted during 
Homecoming. Also, officers 
are more alert for problems. 

The football game is the big- 
gest concern because general- 



ly there are a large number of 
people in attendance who are 
under the influence of alcohol. 
However, Postelwait reports 
that the last three to four 
years have been relatively 
calm. Another problem that 
Public Safety must face is 
vandalism. The most common 
targets for abuse on campus 
are lights, windows, and oc- 



casionally cars. 

So as not to give the impres- 
sion that all arrests and cita- 
tions involve students, Postel- 
wait points out, "There are 
about an equal number of stu- 
dents and non-students in- 
volved in incidents. Usually, 
the non-students are involved 
in alcohol-related incidents. 



Thursday, Oct. 8, 1987 




TlTe 



LARION 



CALL 



ClaXLon Liniij£%±iiLf of lpEnn6.ifLuania 



Kapusnik sentenced to 60 days 



by Deborah M. Schofield, 
Editor in Chief 



handed down to John Michael 
Kapusnik Monday for a sim- 
A eo-day jail sentence was Ple assault charge by Senior 

m 



BARB BUCK 
Clarion University Volleyball Player 

Photo by Mike Bordo, Photography Editor 

SPORTS CALENDAR 

OCTOBER 1 THROUGH 7 

1 Tennis vs. Lock Haven (H) 3 p.m. 
3 HOMECOMING DAY 

Football vs. The Rock (H) 2 p.m. 

Men's & Women's X-Country Alumni Meet (H) 11 am 

Volleyball at California with Waynesburg 
6 Tennis at Indiana 

Volleyball vs. Allegheny with UPJ (H) 7 p.m. 




SPORTS TIP 



CALL 

2380 



MAIN STREET, U.S.A. . . .Alive with activity during ALF, Saturday's Main 
Street Is full of clowns, shoppers, spectators, and food lovers tasting 1987's 
^®^*'^'*y- Photo by Mike Bordo. Photography Editor 



Judge Paul B. Greiner. 

Kapusnik, a former CUP 
student from Natrona 
Heights, was found guilty of 
one count of simple assault 
following a fight with his girl- 
friend November 16 outside a 
Main Street pizza parlor. 

The jail sentence included 
29 days already served by Ka- 
pusnik before bail was 
granted last December, and 
eligibility for work release. 
The sentence will be served in 
the Clarion County Jail begin- 
ning tomorrow or Saturday. 

I^pusnik was also placed 
on probation for one year (to 
run concurrent with the jail 
term), and ordered to pay a 
$300 fine and court costs. 

The former U.S. Marine 
was accused of stabbing two 
CUP students when they inter- 
rupted the fight between Ka- 
pusnik and his former girl- 
friend last November. One 
student died. 

Judge Merle E. Wiser dis- 
missed homicide and ag- 
gravated assault charges 
against Kapusnik, 23, May 18 
after halting the trial before 
the defense began its presen- 
tation. Wiser granted the de- 
fenses' request for a demurrer 
saying that Clarion County 
District Attorney William 
Kern failed to disprove two 
possible defenses to the crime. 

"The court made what they 
felt was an appropriate deci- 
sion," said Defense Attorney 
Tom Ceraso after the sentenc- 
ing. He doesn't plan to appeal 
the decision. 



Kapusnik's sentencing was 
one of 29 in the Clarion County 
Courtroom Monday. 

Greiner, 71, was a guest 
judge replacing Wiser for 
Monday's sentencings, ap- 
parently restricting Wiser's 
involvement in Clarion Coun- 
ty criminal cases. 

Kern began the proceedings 
by asking Greiner to take into 
consideration the chain of 
events that happened after the 
assault occurred when sen- 
tencing Kapusnik. 

Ceraso protested Kern's re- 
quest saying, "It integrates 
facts into the situation" that 
have no effect on the simple 
assault charges. He went on to 
say there was "nothing out of 
the ordinary about the sen- 
tencing," and Kapusnik's job, 
home life, and clean record 
since the incident should be 
taken into consideration. 
"(Kapusnik) has not had any 
problems since the event oc- 
curred." Ceraso concluded by 
saying the charge was only a 

"Kapusnik has not had 
any problems since the 
event occurred/* 

—Tom Ceraso 

simple assault charge 
between girlfriend and boy- 
friend, and asked for nothing 
greater for his client than pro- 
bation. 

Greiner questioned Kapus- 
nik about his one-time contact 
with his former girlfriend and 



■^ ^ATtSibMiV 




10 ttii' 




JOHN MICHAEL KAPUSNIK 

Clarion Call File Photo 

victim, then ordered that 
Kapusnik have "no contact 
whatsoever with the victim." 
Ceraso assurred Greiner that 
contact was a one-time occur- 
rence and not for the purpose 
of renewing that relationship. 

Kern, Ceraso, and Jack 
Lowe, co-council for Kapusnik, 
were in conference before 
Greiner's bench for nearly 35 
minutes before Kapusnik was 
sentenced. 

Simple assault is a second- 
degree misdemeanor. 

Kapusnik could have faced 
up to two years in jail and 
fines totaling $5,000. He has 30 
days to appeal the decision. 



^ 



PEiRCE WEEKEND WEATHER 

Clear and mild ■ hi's in 50*8 
lo's in the mid-30'8 



Two Seniors Stage 
"Greater Tuna" 

Features — Page 13 



Gridders19th 
In DIv. 11 Poll 

Sports — Page 21 



No more Little Sisters 
at CUP 

News — Page 5 



2-THE CLARION CALL, Clarion, PA. Thursday, Oct. 8, 1987 



THE CLARION CALL, Clarion, PA, Thursday, Oct.8, 1987— 3 




OPINION 




In Memorium 



Autumn Reflections 

BY Deborah M. Schoffield 
Editor in Chief, Clarion Call 

As the Autumn Leaf Festival wound down Sunday, and people shuf- 
fled downtown to peer under car hoods, eat one more funnel cake, and 
make one last throw for that prize goldfish, I began to feel the finality of 
my senior year. Autumn Leaf is such a festive time. . .full of old friends, 
school spirit, lots of food, beer, and parties. . .all caught up in the whirl- 
wind of one weekend. It amazes me that Saturday's loud, bandfilled, float- 
filled, people-filled Main street could become so calm Sunday. People I 
haven't seen since last spring greeted me with wide smiles full of tales of 
the real world, the world outside Clarion University. 

So what will happen to me come May? Where will I be? Who will I 
be? These were not the questions I pondered upon Sunday. Rather, Autumn 
Leafs close was a chance to look back. . .back at who and what I've been 
for the past three years . 

Fve been a student, working hard to make that grade so I could prove 
myself time and time again. I studied late hours; I got up early to type; I 
even pulled some all nighters (which never really seemed to help). I suf- 
fered under the classes I couldn't crack, and boasted over those which I 

enjoyed. 

Fve been a socializer, from adjusting to all new people my freshman 
year to chuckling over old times over a beer. I've made new friends and 
lost some old ones, and experienced the triumphs and pains of male re- 
lationships. 

I've been an observer, absorbing all that which goes on around me. I 
have failed and I have achieved, but have learned equally the value of both. 
Strangers and experiences have permeated me and molded me into a fig- 
ure ready to step beyond the college world. 

All of these roles emerged, and probably some others which I'm still 

(See Life.... Page 4) 




« 



The Clarion Call 



Room 1 Harvey Hall 




Clarion University of Pennsylvania 
Clarion, Pennsylvania 16214 
Phone 814-226-2380 



THE STAFF 

. . . DEBORAH M. SCHOFIELD 

Editor in Chief y^ M KOONES 

News Editor MARIA L. KAPSAK 

Features Editor P^^Iq ^^ maHAFFEY 

Sports Editor CHRISTINE JANECZEK 

Ad Design Editor RICHARD W. FAIRBEND 

Ad Sales Manager MICHAEL P. BAUER 

Business Manager ^PT baRLOW 

Ac viser MIKE BORDO 

Protography Editor p^TEH B. McMILLEN 

Circulation Manager DAN BRINLEY and VONDA SWARTS 

Copy Editors 



The Clanon Call ,s published every Thursday durmg the school year In accordance ^i"' l^e ^chooj 

calendar Editors accept contributions to their sections frorr, any source, but reserve the right to edit 

all copy tor libel, taste, style and length. 

The absolute deadline lor editorial copy is 12;00 noon on Monday. .K««,Moi,,n 

The opm'ons expressed in the editorials are those of the writers and not necessarily the opinion 

ot the university or of the student body. 

Mail Subscription Rates: 

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American Scholastic Press Association 
Award Winner 



CINDY KARPAW 

"Misfortunes have their life and 
their limits, their sickness and their 
health." - Michael de Montaigne 
(1533-1592). 

Captured by the emotional weight 
of a tragedy, a clear picture is sel- 
dom seen. When do we begin to ask - 
"why?" 

Is there an answer? 

There can be both a time to grieve 
and a time to grow. Or one can con- 
tinue life as though nothing has 
happened. We are rather content 
and happy in avoidmg something un- 
pleasant, but if happiness relies on 
this, then for complete happiness 
we'd only have to busy ourselves 
with the unimportant. 

Crises, both large and small, 
strike people daily. Taking the good 
from a crisis and applying it to your 
life, and the lives of others, is im- 

Norm's Dorm 

have: ioW^EC^^ 



portant for growth from crisis ex- 
periences. 

Crisis struck the Clarion Campus 
over and over again in 1986-87. There 
is a great deal to reflect upon. Un- 
fortunately, it can also be reduced to 
"Chandler-chat." Chandler-chat 
consists of only discussing the Who, 
When, and headline What. The Who 
is only a name. The When is just a 
day. And the headline What is read 
in a local paper. Yet, a little thought 
added to the same topic can make a 
difference in how we perceive this 
news. We can begin to emphathize 
and learn from what is happening 
around us. Today - the here and now 
- isn't replaced by tomorrow's news ; 
it becomes tomorrow's news. Until 
we learn through experience, 
history will repeat itself, and the un- 
expected will always happen. The 
effect of last year continues through- 
out the lives of our roommates, 
wingmates, fraternity brothers, 
forority sisters, friends, classmates, 
professors, our entire community, 
and certainly throughout our own 
lives. 

Just one example of how yester- 
day can affect today is the following 
article. May 6, 1987, was the last 
time many Clarion students saw Bob 
Barckhoff. Bob and his girlfriend, 
Cindy Karpaw, were in a car acci- 
dent on that May evening. Bob didn't 
survive the accident. The following 
article explains how Cindy is sur- 
viving. Bob's memory is with many 
of us, as are the memories of all the 
others we lost in the 1986-87 school 
year. This article is presented in the 
belief that learning growth can 
occur through reflection upon their 
deaths. 

-by Christine Janeczek 



"Tough times demand tough 
talk, demand tough hearts, de- 
mand tough songs. . ." 

-RUSH, 1987 

They say all things in life have 
their purpose, and I am a firm be- 
liever in that. Some things we don't 
completely understand, but in time, 
they say, we will. 

We will understand in time. 
Before this summer, I had never 
had a chance to apply this principle. 
But on May 6, 1987, life changed. My 
closest friend in the world was killed 
in a car accident. 

We all knew him — Bob Barckhoff 
was the kind of person to say "hello" 
and strike up a conversation with a 
complete stranger. We all knew 
what a friendly person he was — he 
would have done anything for a 
friend, anything and he would have 
enjoyed it. That's a rare quality 
these days, and yet it came as nat- 
urally to him as smiling. He was one 
of those truly GOOD people, the one- 
in-a-million kind. 

I don't think anyone could do jus- 
tice in describing Bob to someone 
who didn't know him. But I think it's 
very important that those of us who 
did know him keep hkn alive in our 
hearts. I know that he will always be 
a part of me, and many of his close 
friends feel the same. I suppose 
some people come into our lives and 
touch us in a special way, and we 
can never be the same again. 

Bob was one of those people. 

I could go on for pages about what 
a wonderful person Bob was, but I 
really don't feel that it's the right of 
anyone to impose some preformed 
opinions on others who can never 
judge the situation for themselves. 
(See Park.... Page 4) 






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j|( ftY I oiA^e-rT^. lA. kf^ t^rr 







The Call Mailbox 



I>ear Editor, 

Let me first state that I do not wish 
to criticize Ray Tomczak or Cindy 
Karpaw on their reviewing exper- 
tise. I think they do a fine job of re- 
viewing the movie's fine points. The 
problem is that they do not stop at 
reviewing the movie, but feel com- 
pelled to summarize it! If I wanted a 
quick synopsis of a movie, I would 
read Cliff's Notes to it, not the re- 
views. Since there are no Cliff's 
Notes for movies, do Ms. Karpaw 
and Mr. Tomczak feel they must fill 
this void that Cliff's Notes don't 
cover? When I read a review of a 
movie, I want to know if the movie is 
good enough for me to pay my 
money to see, not who does what to 
make the end of the movie come out 
right. 

This has the same effect as the 
rude person who sits in the back of 
the theater and tells his or her 
friends what is going to happen a se- 
cond or two before it happens. It's 
distracting, much like your sum- 
maries in your articles, Ray and 
Cindy. Your reviews are fine opin- 
ions, no better or worse than any 
other "professional" review teams. 
In my opinion, your article will 
greatly improve if you eliminate the 
summaries. Please consider my 
comments as merely suggestions 
from someone who may stop reading 
your article for the sake of seeing a 
movie, before reading the end in 
the CALL. 

Bob Moyer 



Tt W im bt Up 

Dear Editor, 

In the October 1st issue of the Call, 
a letter voiced complaints over the 
September 24 movie review by Cin- 
dy Karpaw and Ray Tomczak. As a 
one-time Call reviewer myself - and 
target of many such letters - I felt 
the need to comment. 

The letter's first complaint con- 
cerned the review's title, and the 
title's lack of relevance in the arti- 
cle. Whether or not such a point was 
valid, the title of a newspaper article 
is not chosen by the writers of that 
article. It is chosen by their editor, 
after the article has been written. No 
blame can therefore be laid upon 
Ms. Karpaw or Mr. Tomczak for any 
of their article titles. 

The letter of complaint also voiced 
anger over the review's detailed de- 
scription of the movie, which sup- 
posedly made seeing the movie un- 
necessary. This point, too, may 
seem to make sense, until examined 
further. The purpose of a movie re- 
view is not to entice viewers to go 
see a film. It is only to judge that 
film, as any literary work should be 
judged (could you imagine a Shake- 
spearean critique that didn't 
mention the play's ending?). Grant- 
ed, all reviewers are different, and 
many (myself included) never re- 
vealed a film's ending. This, how- 
ever, is the decision of the individual 
reviewer, and not a rule carved in 
stone. Therefore, now knowing how 
Ms. Karpaw and Mr. Tomczak re- 



LLetters \jo the editor are accepted and 
lencouraged. All letters must be signed 
Ibut names mil be held upon request 







^/f, ',:, -/^^ - ^ ;M^'-y' 




CPS 



m Wk A&MH... »D,M k %WL,. 



view films, I would recommend that 
interested moviegoers see a particu- 
lar film before reading the Call's re- 
view of that film. 

Finally, to Ms. Karpaw and Mr. 
Tomczak, keep up the good work. It 
is a terrific idea to add the "Siskel 
and Ebert" style of movie reviewing 
to your column. I'll be at least one of 
your weekly readers. 

Sincerely, 
Mike McKinney 

ConctriMd Student 

Dear Editor, 

I would like to inform you of a sit- 
uation that occured Saturday night 
at the Homecoming Caberet spon- 
sored by the Black Student Union. 
My roommate, myself and our boy- 
friends were planning to attend the 
dance, but we were met at the door 
by four members of the committee 
who told us that we were not "dress- 
ed up" enough to go in. 

The dance was supposed to be 
semi-formal. I was wearing dress 
pants and a sweater. My roommate 
was wearing a dress. Our boyfriends 
were wearing sweaters and dress 
pants. What is the meaning of semi- 
formal? I assumed that meant no 
jeans, t-shirts or sneakers. 

The worst part was that one of the 
male members of the committee 
was wearing a sweater and dress 
pants. When asked about this, they 
responded that he was on the com- 
mittee and that was o.k. 

If you ask me, this was a case of 
discrimination. The sign for the 
dance said "•Everyone is Wel- 
come*" but this was simply not the 
case. I know that myself and my 
friends were not the only white peo- 
ple turned away and I think that be- 
ing white was the only reason that 
we were. 

Sincerely, 

A Concerned Student 



YOUR NEWSPAPER 




PEOPLE 

SERVING 

PEOPLE 



(MTWMU. fCWVAKN WCEK 
OCTOMM t-lftlW 



MTKMILimiVAHIIWnK I 




Your NewspapCR People Serving People 




FWfdllQ TfOUMM 

Dear Editor; 

Parking on campus has become a 
heated issue lately and I believe 
there must be a solution to the pro- 
blem facing all university drivers. 
There have been complaints from 
students and staff alike, and both 
have their merits. 

At some schools they solve the pro- 
blem by not allowing underclass- 
men to keep cars on campus, unless 
they commute. Other universities 
assign parking spaces. Finally, we 
could have no designated areas at 
all, staff or student, and allow free- 
for-alls. 

I'm a returning student who also 
works to support my family. It is 
frustrating to be late to class every- 
day, because in your rush from work 
to school and back again you spend 
15 to 20 minutes waiting for a place 
to park. This has been a particular 
problem recently, due to the con- 
struction workers and several staff 
members who find it necessary to 
park in the commuter lot next to the 
chapel. The idea of giving commut- 
ers a special sticker all their own 
would also help solve the problem if 
there were lots such as, the Chapel 
lot only for them. 

One writer suggested that if peo- 
ple would make wise use of their 
time, they wouldn't have any trouble 
parking. Well, sitting in your car 
waiting for a parking place is not 
exactly what I call well spent time. 

Finally, there are two points re- 
maining that will undoubtedly get 
me flack from somewhere. One, 
although the staff are, I would hope, 
more educated than the lowly stu- 
dents, by all rights we are their em- 
ployers. That is to say that we 
students pay these people to teach us 
and supply us with the needed ser- 
vices to maintain the quality of this 
our university. We pay tuition and 
we or our families pay the taxes that 
supply the pay for these people. So 



why should these, our employees, 
have better parking spaces than 
ours and also take what little we 
have when their prime lots are fill- 
ed? 

Second, there are three handicap- 
ped spaces behind Becht Hall; this 
building is not even handicap ac- 
cessable! I am not suggesting that 
special spaces for handicapped peo^ 
pie are not important, what I sug- 
gest is let's put them in better 
places. 

The best answer would be, I be- 
lieve, to open all parking spaces (ex- 
cept handicapped) to anyone with a 
university parking sticker 
university parking sticker regard- 
less of position. Sure there will be 
those who will complain, but until a 
better solution comes along, they 
would just have to live with it. 

Sincerely, 

Keith R.Beal, junior 

Soc/Psy&PolSci 

GRADUATE SCHOOL? 

Thinking of graduate 

Thinking of graduate school? 100 
graduate schools will be at the Grad 
Fair '87 held at Penn State. 

LIBRARY TOURS 

Library Tours or Mini- 
Courses for Classes, Groups, 
or Individuals. For an 
appointment call Mr. 
McDanielatl841. 

MALE RA's NEEDED 

Additional male resident assist- 
ants are needed for Fall '87. Appli- 
cations may be picked up in 210 Eg- 
bert Hall. Applications accepted 
until positions filled. Apply early. 

ADOPT A GRANDPARENT 

It's not too late to adopt a grand- 
parent! See Bert Lauder, Activities 
Director at the Clarion Health Care 
Manor or call the Campus Ministry 
Office at 226-6402. 



THE WHITE HOUSE 
WASHINGTON 

NATIONAL NEWSPAPER WEEK 
October 4-10, 1987 



I am delighted to extend greetings once again to 
newspaper staffs and readers across our land who 
are joining the Newspaper Association Managers in 
observing National Newspaper Week, 1987. 

From the days of Peter Zenger onward, newspapers 
have played a critical role in the history of liberty 
and in the founding and preservation of our Republic. 
Today, newspapers continue to bring local, national, 
and international news to our doorstep, giving us 
the information so vital to a free people. We owe 
a debt of gratitude to all those throughout our 
history who have worked and sacrificed for our 
freedom of the press — and to the thousands upon 
thousands of newspaper staffers who now produce 
our newspapers day after day. They are truly, as 
the theme for this year's Newspaper Week reminds 
us, "People Serving People." 

Nancy joins me in sending best wishes for a 
successful week and for the future. God bless 
you, and God bless America. 



H \ r*^.JJ^ vG-J^Ki-^ 



IT. J. 



4-THE CLARION CALL. Clarion, PA, Thursday, Oct. 8, 1987 



■ SlKa ■ ■ ■ 



(Continued from Page 2) 



To me and to most of his friends, if 
you knew Bob, you just knew these 
things to be true. 

All actions have their purpose; 
they work out for the best. We tend 
to look at these statements rather 
cynically, but, already, I have begun 
to find purposes and good beyond the 
pain and emptiness I feel. 

First, I have come to appreciate 
life for the miracle it is — we often 
don't realize how precious it is until 
it is nearly taken away from us. Bob 
Barckhoff DID appreciate living. He 
savored every moment. Bob prob- 
ably enjoyed more of his life than 
many people three or four times his 
mere 21 years. Perhaj» he was 
taken away from us to soon because 
of just that. 

Second, I have found the meaning 
of true friendship. We sometimes 
don't discover our true friends until 
we are forced into their arms. In my 
case, I found that I have more 
friends than I could ever imagine. I 
can't even count the cards, phone 
calls, and visits from people while I 
was in the hospital, and they contin- 
ued throughout the summer. 
FYiends I never knew I had showed 
me how much they cared and 
wanted to help. I feel fortunate that I 
can now value my friendships for 
their true worth — and my friends 
have shown that they are worth 
more than all the gold in the world. 

This leads to my last point. 

I was probably closer to Bob than 
anyone, and I know that he never 
realized how many people loved 
him. There were times when we 
were alone that he'd confide in me - 



Life. 



he didn't like to admit it, but he felt 
like the people he enjoyed being with 
didn't reciprocate that feeling. So 
he'd try harder, do more things for 
these people, make a superhuman 
effort to go out of his way to show 
them he truly cared. But he never 
really knew in his own heart, he was 
never really sure that his friends felt 
as much for him as he did for them. 
These apprehensions took much of 
his enjoyment from the time he 
spent with these people. It is such a 
shame! He deserved to know how 
much his friends cared, because he 
cared for them so much. Now it's en- 
tirely too obvious that his friends did 
really care. Now that it's too late, 
they appreciate him openly, the way 
they should have when he was aliv«. 
That's why I now make it a priority 
to make sure people are appreciated 
when they go out of their way for 
someone: the way Bob always joy- 
fully did. 

As for me, I'm just taking every- 
thing one day at a tune. Maybe it's a 
different kind of enjoyment of life, 
but I've found that I can go on, and I 
can enjoy it. But, I don't think I'll 
ever say goodbye — he's too much a 
part of me. As I sit writing this, I'm 
listening to the new Rush album; it 
just came out today. It seems to me 
Bob should be here discussing it with 
me, enjoying it with me. He looked 
forward to this day for so long. 

Now it's up to us. We must look 
forward to our lives ahead of us, 
taking what we have learned from 
people like Robert George Barckhoff 
Jr . , and not looking back. 
— Miss Cindy Karpaw is a senior 
communication major. 



I ■(Continued from Page 2) 
not aware of, educating me not only of my profession, but of life. In high 
school, I perceived college as a means to another end, namely a good job. 
But in three years Fve learned college is, in many ways, an end in itself. It's 
a time to develcqj responsibility, to learn how to make judgements, and to 
grow through social relationships. It's a time to strive to achieve, and a 
time to learn to pick up yourself once you've fallen flat on your face. 

I once knew someone who was planning on ^ing through college in 
less than fcxir years, concentrating solely on academics. But college is 
more than acackmlcs; and if academics become the sole focus, he will 
leave college only partially educated. In the working environment, not only 
will he have to ac^ust professionally, he will also have to discover himself 
socially. 

It is a link which must be met somewhere, and college is the place to 
grab it. Develqjing yourself academically and socially will mold you into a 
steady figure ready to break out into the Veal world.' 

As the leaves change into red and a golden brown, and as winter's 
chilled fingers grab at my face, I can know that what Fve learned here can- 
not be bought, or sold, or traded. It's a world I've learned to conquer, and 
have enjoyed doing so. Next year, the parade will go on and Fll be missing, 
but the continuing education here will yeild yet even more conquerors. 




THE CLARION CALL, Clarion, PA, Thursday, Oct. 8, 1987— 5 



Kmii to the iwe«t tooth Candy 

IngALF. 



and caramel apples are only two of the sweet treats which tempt food lovers dur- 

Photo by Steve McAnlnch, Staff Pftotograpfier 




by Liz Koones, 
News Editor 



President Reagan faces a defeat 
of his efforts to seat Robert Bork on 
the Supreme C!ourt. The Senate Ju- 
diciary Committee has voted 
against Bork, and the full floor vote 
is expected to yield the same results. 

Even though the nomination is 
pretty much a lost cause, President 
Reagan still wants the full Senate 
vote. In spite of the president's 
power, and the massive lobbying by 
conservatives for Bork, it looks like 
he will lose the nomination. 

Observers say there are many 
reasons why Bork is losing the bat- 
tle. Bork's personality and appear- 
ance proved to be very unappealing 
on the televised hearings. The demo- 
crats also hold the majority in the 
Senate, and were able to delay the 
hearings long enough to build a 
strong campaign against him. 
Bork's supporters say their worst 
error was underestimating the hard- 
hitting effect that the Democratic 
campaign had on him. 



With the nomination in doubt, a 
new question arises. If not Bork, 
then who? 

Will the Senate be ready to right 
when a second candidate is found. 
The administration is not going to 
nominate a liberal. This leaves 
Bork's opponents with a choice, be- 
tween Bork and someone else just as 
conservative. 

The president might face trouble if 
he nominates another controversial 
candidate. But the White House has 
at least 15 possible nominees, that 
were chosen before Bork was 
named, that have better recordsand 
are less controversial. 

With these other conservatives 
waiting in the wings, a rejection of 
Bork may settle nothing. But the 
hearings have sent a warning to the 
president. Neither the public nor the 
Senate wants an ideologically dis- 
torted court. The administration 
realizes now that it will have trouble 
selling someone seen as an extrem- 
ist. TTiey will have to work to find 
another candidate that will fit more 
into the mainstream of the Supreme 
(burt. 




C-93 Salutes Clarion University 

For The Best Homecoming Ever! 



Go Eagles! 



A% 



Biat 



Just Clowning Around. .. ALF's 

Festive jesters with fists full of 
balloons brought smiles to chil- 
dren and adults alike. 

Photo by Saad Muhammad, 
Staff Photographer 



SPRING INTERNSHIP 

Walt Disney World's College Pro- 
gram is seeking interns for the 
Spring semester in areas of food, 
merchandise, attractions, and cus- 
todian. For more information stop 
by Career Placement. 



WE'RE OPEN 
'TIL 9 P.M. 

ApoUodorus 

526 MAIN ST., CLARION 

226-5431 

DISCS, LP's & 
CASSETTES 




NEWS 



Little sister groups to be discontinued 



by Liz Koones, 
News Editor 



In order to comply with 
Title IX of the Education 
Amendments Act of 1972, all 
Qarion University fraterni- 
ties and sororities must dis- 
continue their recognition of 
little sister and little brother 
groups. Greeks could face a 
toss of their official university 
recognition if they do not com- 
ply with the act. 

In a correspondence to fra- 
ternity and sorority presi- 
dents, Dr. George Curtis, Vice 
President for Student Affairs, 
said Title IX prohibits sex dis- 
crimination in higher educa- 
tion. While a fraternity or sor- 
ority can limit its membership 



to a single sex, it cannot dis- 
criminate on the basis of sex 
in activities and programs it 
provides to non-members. 

Title IX prohibits discrimin- 
ation in all federally fimded 
education programs. Groups 
whose memb^hip practices 
are exempt, besides fraterni- 
ties and sororities, are the 
YMCA and YWCA, girl and 
boy scouts, camp fire girls, 
and voluntary youth service 
organizations. Programs 
aimed at women must be 
modified, under Title IX, to in- 
clude both sexes. Included in 
this group are women's stu- 
dies courses, continuing edu- 
cation programs, and 
programs and campus com- 
mittees aimed at improving 



the status of women. Also, 
programs not operated by ed- 
ucational institutions but 
which receive significant as- 
sistance from them must be 
offered without discrimina- 
tion. Those groups are busi- 
ness and professional fraterni- 
ties, sororities, and societies, 
women's organizations and 
women's centers. 

Curtis said that in the past, 
"People knew about it (Title 
DC), but it didn't get a lot of at- 
tention. We are not reacting to 
a crisis or a problem situa- 
tion." He said that more at- 
tention has come to the act be- 
cause there is someone that is 
primarily responsible for 
Greeks now. 








Jamming to the beat. 

the ALF Parade. 



.Main Street In Clarion was overflowing with spectators enjoying the sights and sounds of 

Photo by Mike Bordo, Photography Editor 



Faculty approves 3 year contract 



by Suzanne Halleman, 
News Staff Writer 



I 



Clarion faculty members 
have voted in favor of the 
three year contract agree- 
ment ttiat was proposed to 
them. 

The contract consisted of 
changes in salary, funds for 
faculty professional develop- 
ment, and continuing educa- 
tion. 

Two of our sister schools, 
Indiana University and Slip- 
pery Rock University rejected 
the proporal, but the majority 
favored it. 

Mr. William Fulmer, Pres- 
ident of Clarion Chapter 
(APSCUF), Association of 
Pennsylvania State College 
and University Faculty, said, 
"It is satisfactory but not a 
good contract." 

■nie Board oi Governors will 
meet to presumably sign the 



agreement on October 20 at half so the proposals can be 

Slippery Rock University. slated one year before this 

Contracting again will begin three year contract ends, 
in approximately a year and a 

CHANGES IN FACULTY 
SALARIES AND PRICE LEVELS 
1 985- 1 989 ACADEMI C YEARS 



CUMULATIVE 
PERCENTAGES 




■ SALARIES 
D PRICES 



198S 1986 1987 1988 1989 
YEARS 

Source: APSCUF ColleclWe Borgainlng Agreemenls. 

Acodeme. Vol 73(2).p 5 , end Monthly Lobor 

Review, Bureou of Lobor Statistics Courtesy of APSCUF 



The university could lose 
federal funds if any organi- 
zation that is officially recog- 
nized engages in these prac- 
tices. The government auth- 
orizes state universities to be 
in the state's financial aid pro- 
gram. If the university is 
caught doing anything 
involved witii Title IX, the 
government can take away its 
authorization for aid. Then the 
university would not be able to 
give student loans. 

"I hope no one tiiinks they 
are being threatened," said 
Curtis. He said that he wants 
to work with the four fraterni- 
ties which have littie sisters, 
and added that Uie university 
has no objection to a Greek or- 



ganization opening its mem- 
bership to both sexes. 

Diana Anderson, Director of 
Greek Life, said she has heard 
no response from any lit- 
tle sisters, but she said some 
of the fraternities are not hap- 
py about it. "They are willing 
to work with us, said Ander- 
son. "They have been told 
they must discontinue the 
practice. They can no longer 
take new littie sister members 
or coUect dues from them." 

"I want to spend time on 
positive ways to strengthen 
their (fraternities) pro- 
grams," said Anderson, 
"without ttie support of little 
sisters. We will work on ways 
to fill tfiat void." 



Chinese group offers 
support and education 



by Robin Martin, 
News Staff Writer 



ITiere has been an interest- 
ing and unique addition to the 
numerous organizations al- 
ready present on Clarion's 
campus. This new addition is 
called The Chinese Student 
Association of CUP (CSA- 
CUP). 

CSA-CUP currentiy has 23 
members and is expected to 
grow over the coming years. 
Students in ttie group origi- 
nate from three different 
areas including the Peoples 
Republic of China, Taiwan, 
and Hong Kong. The goal of 
this organization is aimed to- 
ward helping Chinese stu- 
dents at Qanon support and 
relate to one another, while 
also educating others about 
China and its culture. 

The Chinese Student Or- 
ganization is expecting to open 
a "China Qub^' in ttie near 
future, to introduce China to 
non-Chinese people. In the fu- 



ture, the organization would 
like to offer a Chinese Day in 
tiie cafeteria, holding martial 
arts classes, having Chinese 
speakers talk in classrooms, 
and other educational activi- 
ties. These events and oppor- 
tunities would allow students 
to enjoy and experience Chi- 
nese Culture and lifestyle. 

CSA-CUP held its first 
meeting on September 25, and 
the following officers were ap- 
pointed: Lin Junyue, Presi- 
dent; Jia-Wei Hsu, Vice Pres- 
ident, and Lu Minde, Secre- 
tary. The association was or- 
ganized by Lin Junyue and Lu 
Minde. Dr. S. K. Ainsworth, 
and Dr. Chin W. Yang, now 
preside as the advisors for the 
association. 

The Chinese Student As- 
sociation could prove to be a 
valuable asset to the Chinese 
and non-Chinese students at 
CUP. If interested in being in- 
volved contact Mr. Song Gao 
or Mr. Lu Minde at (814) 226- 
5443. 



Oct. 
Oct. 



8: 
9: 



Oct. 10: 
Oct. 12: 
Oct. 13: 



Oct. 14: 



Oct. 8: 

Oct. 9: 

Oct. 10: 

Oct. 13: 

Oct. 13: 

Oct. 14: 



CAMPUS CALENDAR 

ACADEMIC AND INFORMATIONAL 

Senior Yearbook pictures taken, 126 Riemer 
Senior Yearbook pictures taken, 126 Riemer 
University Women's Club luncheon, 12:30 p.m. 
Faculty Senate meeting, 140 Pelrce, 4 p.m. 
Athletic Department "Time Out" luncheon. Holiday Inn. 12 noon 
Share the Word scripture study, 4-5 p.m., 140 Pelrce 
Class withdrawals begin, 10 a.m.. Registrar's Office, 122 Carrier 
"Church Chat: The Catholic Church • Who are we?" 4-5 p.m. 
140 Pelrce 

ENTERTAINMENT 
CB presents "The Cousteau Society," Mar.-Boyd Aud., 8:15 p.m. 
CB movie "The Color of Money," Harvey Multi-Purpose, 8 p.m. 
CAB'S, Harvey Multi-Purpose, 9:30 p.m. 
Koinonia Olympics, 1 p.m. 
CAB'S outside of Harvey Multi-Purpose, 9:30 p.m. 
Drama performance "Greater Tuna," Littie Theatre, 8:15 p.m. 
Drama performance, "Greater Tuna," Little Theatre, 8:15 p.m. 



By Trisha Matteson, 
News Staff Writer 



6— THE CLARION CALL. Clarion, PA, Thursday, Oct. 8, 1987 

CUP professor taught 
series in Brazil 

not typical of Brazil." Most of 
Braaf is rural. 

Ttiis is not Caesar's first 
Fulbright Lectureship. He re- 
ceived one from 1981-82 to Sau- 
di Arabia. He has also taught 
in Egypt and China, all within 
the last eight years. 

Of all the places Caesar has 
taught, he said, Rio was ''the 
most dangerous city I've ever 
lived in." Brazil is, physically, 
larger than the U.S., but is 
also poorer. Of the 140 million 
people who live in Brazil, the 
majority are illiterate. 

"The hardest thing about 
living in Brazil was that it was 
so easy to live there. They 
(Brazilians) are so similar to 
us that you tend to ignore the 
differences, but they are there 
and very profound." 

Caesar s biggest regret was 
that he didn't travel enough. 
But on the whole, he enjoyed 
his teaching experience tliere. 

Fulbright professors are 
chosen each year from all 
over the U.S. Caesar was the 
first to be chosen from Clarion 
University. 



Dr. Terry Caesar of the 
English department recently 
returned from a Fulbright 
Lectureship in Brazil. 

Caesar taught a series of 
American Literature courses 
at the Federal University of 
Rio de Janeiro. He also lectur- 
ed throughout Brazil. 

During his year and a half of 
teaching in Rio, there were 
several student strikes, one 
lasting for two months. "I was 
never more aware of the poli- 
tical implications of what I 
was doing," said Caesar of his 
experiences. 

Most of Caesar's students 
also worked as teachers. "In 
the United States, college is an 
initiation rite — more social 
For example, most college 
students in the U.S. live in 
dorms. In Brazil, most stu- 
dents live with their families," 
commented Caesar. 

Caesar would like to stress 
that "just as New York City is 
not typical of the U.S., Rio is 




Blame It on Rio. 

ature courses. 



.Dr. Terry Caesar relaxes in his office. Dr. Caesar spent a year and a half teaching a series of liter- 

Photo by Peter B. McMillen, Staff Photograptier 



Fellowships offered to minorities 



Program assists 
ROTC students 



by Patty Pocta, 
News Staff Writer 



by Charla Frank, 
News Staff Writer 



Each spring graduating 
seniors at colleges and uni- 
versities throughout the Uni- 
ted States face the problem of 
finding a job after graduation. 
Many students enter the job 
market without experience or 
personal contacts. 

The Reserve Officer's Train- 
ing Corps (ROTC) offers a 
special program open to all 
science and engineer majors 
enrolled in ROTC that can 
assist students with these 
problems. 

Hiis is a co-operative course 
with the Department of the 
Army Scientific and Engi- 
neering Program (DASE). 
The DASE co-op is available 



to all students. It is advised 
that students participate as 
soon as possible. The longer 
you work in the co-op, the 
higher the pay grade you re- 
ceive after graduation. 

The minimum eligibility re- 
quirements are that you must 
be a full time student, a sci- 
ence major, have good 
academic standards, be en- 
roUed in ROTC, and must be 
willing to work one semester 
off campus at a coK)p position. 

This program has been of- 
fered for several years, but 
only one student has partici- 
pated. For more information 
about the DASE co-op, contact 
Major Emory in the Military 
Science department, or Dr. 
Albert Exton in the Physics 
department. 



The National Research 
Council is awarding over 80 
doctoral fellowships for mi- 
norities on behalf of the Ford 
Foundation. These fellowships 
will be granted to American 
Indians, Alaskan Natives 
(Eskimo or Aleut), Black 
Americans, Mexican Ameri- 
cans/Chicanos, Native Pacific 
Islanders (Polynesians or 
Micronesians) , and Puerto 
Ricans. 

Severely underrepresented 
in the nation's PhD ppula- 
tion, and, consequently, col- 
lege and university faculties, 
members of these minority 
groups will be open to oppor- 
tunities for higher education 
and research experience. Sci- 
entists, engineers and schol- 
ars in ttie humanities, showing 
great promise of future 
achievement in academic re- 
search and scholarship in 
higher education, will be 
eligible for the 1988 competi- 
tion. 



The Ford Foundation will 
sponsor approximately 40 
three-year predoctoral fellow- 
^ps and 10 one-year disser- 
tation fellowships, as well as 
35 postdoctoral fellowshii^. 
Iliese awards will be made in 
the behavioral and social sci- 
ences, humanities, engineer- 
ing, mathematics, physical 
sciences, and bidogical scien- 
ces, or for interdisciplinary 
programs comprised of two or 
more eligible disciplines. 

Predoctoral and disserta- 
tion fellowships will be avail- 
able to U.S. citizens, who are 
beginning graduate students 
or who are within one year of 
completing the dissertation, 
and who wish to gain the PhD 
or ScD degree. Fellowships 
can be carried out at any ac- 
credited nonprofit U.S. institu- 
tion of higher education. 
Those interested in applying 
for the predoctoral fellowships 
must have the results of Grad- 
uate Record Examinations 
taken between October 1, 1982 
and December 12, 1987. All 
applicants of the dissertation 



feUowships must be doctoral 
candidates and have finished 
all course work and examina- 
tions by January 15, 1988. The 
deadline for submission of fel- 
lowship applications will be 
November 13, 1987. 

Individuals interested in the 
postdoctoral fellowships may 
apply if thev are U.S. citizens 
preparing tor or engaged in 
college or university teaching, 
and hold doctoral or other ter- 
minal degrees. The fellow- 
s^ps will provide postdoctoral 
research experience at ap- 
propriate non-profit institu- 
tions of higher education, or 
research of the Fellow's 
choice. The deadline for enter- 
ing applications is January 15, 
1968. 

The address to obtain more 
information on the Ford Foun- 
dation Doctoral Fellowship for 
minorities is: 

Ford Foundation Doctoral 
Fellowships, The Fellowship 
Office, National Research 
Council, 2101 Constitution Ave- 
nue, Washington, D.C. 20418. 



5xxxDoaDooc)cxxxxxooooGDcxr3aouaaDDOi 



Cousteau Society 

presents 

DAVID BROWN 

Thursday, Oct. 8-8:15 p.m. Marv^^ick Boyd Aud. 

FREE ADMISSION- Sponsored by Center Board 

O 















• ; o .• 



COLLEGIO'S 

ITALIAN RESTAURANT 



TUES& SAT SPECIAL 

LARGE PIZZA 

%PO>W\/ PLAIN 

5 p.m. - close 



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FREE DELIVERY 11 AM-close 
NO DELIVERY ON SPECIALS 



FRI. 

LASAGNA 

$3.49 

INCLUDING BREAD & SALAD 

EGGPLANT 
PARMESAN 

$2.60 



518 MAIN STREET 

226-5421 



THE CLARION CALL, Clarion, PA, Thursday. Oct. 8, 1987-7 



% 



Senate is active voice on campus 



byLuAnnZeigler, 
News Staff Writer 



Student Senate, a vital part 
of Qarion University's cam- 
pus, is the active voice for stu- 
dent issues and opinions. It is 
similar to a student council in 
hi^ school, but many more 
important issues are dis- 
cussed and acted upon as the 
issues relate to the student 
population. 

The Senate consists of 16 
members; 14 are graduate 
students or upperclassmen 
with 32 or more credits and 
two freshmen students with 31 
or less credits. The students 
must have these credits after 
they have taken office. A stu- 
dent must have a quality 
grade point average of 2.0 out 
of a 4.0 scale to be elected and 
must maintam this average 
during his/her term. The sen- 



ate meets every Tuesday at 7 
p.m. in room 140 in the Peirce 
Science Building. 

If a student is interested in 
running for the Senate, he/she 
must obtain a petition and get 
50 student signatures. Then 
the student must write an es- 
say of 50 to 75 words on why he 
or she would like to run for the 
Senate. Petitions for this 
year's elections are due Octo- 
ber 28 and may be picked up in 
room 222 Egbert Hall. Voting 
wiD be held November 9, 10, 
and 11. 

Tim Murray, chairman of 
the elections committee, 
explains that "the Senate is a 
representative voice for stu- 
dents on our campus." He 
says the Senate consists of 
seven committees, all of 
which guide and regulate dif- 
ferent areas of the campus. 

Each senator must serve on 



one committee, but many sen- 
ators serve on two commit- 
tees. The largest committee, 
the appropriations committee, 
allocates funds from the ac- 
tivity fee paid to the Clarion 
Student Association to various 
organizations on campus. 
TTiey receive the funds ac- 
cording to membership and 
activity level. This committee 
also has the capacity to audit 
any organization which re- 
ceives any funds from the Sen- 
ate. 

The bookstore committee 
serves as an advisor to the stu- 
dent bookstore. There are five 
students and two faculty 
members that serve on the 
committee. 

Denielle Gregg is chairman 
of the committee on commit- 
tees. Their function is to ac- 
cept applications from stu- 
dents that would like to serve 



Battle continues over Bork 



Compiled by Vonda Swarts 
News Staff Writer 



The Supreme Court opened 
its Fall term on Monday with 
only eight judges. 

Robert Bork is to take over 
Lewis Powell's place if he is 
appointed. The White House 
and Congress are in a battle 
over Bork's conservative 
views. 

If Bork is confirmed he still 
won't be sitting in the Su 



FROM 

ALL 

POINTS 






gical Survey. 

The Survey is still in the in- 
fancy stage of trying to under- 
stand the earthquakes and 
what instruments to use. 

Due to the fact that earth- 
quakes start with earth move- 
ments from 5 to 100 miles be- 
low the surface, it is hard to 
measure and monitor the 
ground. 

Research efforts are fo- 
cused on the big earthquake in 
California. All the research is 



preme Court until late in Octo- ......rTTT^^I....,.,.: being done halfway between 

ber, after 20 cases have al- •••• los Angeles and San Fran- 



ready been heard. 



from being mugged again. 



That leaves a good chance Due to the loophole, Lyon, who 
that many cases will end in a is a Miami secunty guard can 



44 tie, holding up the lower 
court decisions. 

Florida Gun-Law 
Florida's new gun law 
states that gun owners can 



wear his gun anywhere he 
goes. 

The police are worried that 
too many innocent people will 
get shot. The Miami police are 



which is frightening to many Predicting Qualces 

^?lfce Lyon is hoping that ^.P^2!S^,f,|2*?"f^,^ 
the new law will keep hrni distant goal of the U.S. Geolo- 



Los Angeles and San Fran 
Cisco on the San Andres Fault. 

TTie town that is getting all 
the attention is Parkfield, Cal. 
Researchers have scattered 
quake measuring devices to 
measure each flutter and 
movement of ground. 

Predicting quakes isn't easy 
and wiD take a while to have a 
fully developed program, but 
in the meantime the U.S. Geo- 
logical Survey is working dil 
igently to understand the 
earthquakes and one day pre- 
dict them 



Healing Arts workshop slated 

A workshop on the prepar- of the Pennsylvania State Uni- curricula, the outlook for 

ation of students for the health versity will open the work- graduates in the sciences and 

professions will be sponsored shop. TTie panelists will dis- the alternatives for students 

by the Pre-Professional Com- cuss, in general, the qualities who do not ultimately enter a 

mittee for the Healing Arts of and abilities they seek in the professional school. 

Qarion University of Pennsyl- students admitted to their pro- ^ .,, , 

• " • - - ' - fessional schools and the role Each group will t^ pre 

of the state universities in the P''^,. ^<>,,f "?1^I . '^^^fS 

preparation of those students, from the audience concenm| 

•rtiis panel will be foUowed ^ school preparation ad- 

by a group of CUP graduates ^isement, career outlooks, en- 

mL^ successful, practicing follment trends, and related 

health professionals. TTiey will issues, 

comment on their perception a luncheon will be served 

of the quality of their und«-- and participants will be 

graduate education and make invitea to tour the CUP sci- 

recommendations for high ence facilities in the 

school students to consider in afternoon, 
career planning. 

Members of the CUP facul- 
ty Mdll discuss the university 



vania, Friday, Oct. 23. 

The workshop, for high 
school guidance counselors 
and science teachers, will be 
held in the Conference Center 
at the Riverview Intermediate 
Unit, l^ppenville, beginning 
at 10 a.m. 

A panel of admissions offi- 
cers from the Pennsylvania 
College of Optometry, Phila- 
delphia College of Osteopathic 
Medicine, the Dental School of 
the University of Pittsburgh, 
and Hershey Medical School 



For more information call 
Dr. Paul E. Beck at 814-226- 
2580. 



on committees, interview 
these students and 
recommend them for a 
committtee. Examples of this 
are the Presidential Advisory 
Committee and the parking 
committee. 

The committee on rules, 
regulations and policies ap- 
proves the activities and gives 
recognition to any organiza- 
tion on campus. 

Murray is chairman of the 
elections committee and ex- 
plains that its function is "to 
supervise and administer 
coUege-wide elections for the 
Senate." 

The food and housing com- 
mittee observes the cafeteria 
and housing, acts as an ad- 
visor and airs opinions about 
both the housing and the cafe- 
teria. 

The last committee is the 
public relations committee. 
They advertise any goings-on 
in the Student Senate. 

Tim Murray stresses that 



"there must be a willingness 
to work when a student wants 
to be involved in the Senate. 
An individual has to have the 
time to become involved. 
Each senator has to work two 
office hours per week. The 
Student Senate is the perfect 
opportunity for a student to 
become actively involved in 
campus issues and activities. 

MODELS 
Both male and female for 
nude modeling for Art Dep. 
Sculpture class. Pay is $5/hr. 
Contact Art Dept. secretary 
or Prof. Charley. 

CHANGE IN CALENDAR 
Please note the perfor- 
mance change by Dizzy Gile- 
spie from 10/22 to 10/20. 

INTERNSHIP 

Internship/Summer Job Bulletins 
are available in Career Placement 
Services at the beginning of each 
month. Listed are the positions that 
employers let us know about. 




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8-THE CLARION CALL, Clarion, PA, Thursday, Oct. 8, 1987 



Autumn celebration leaves fond memories 



by Tamara Robinson, 
News Staff Writer 



The 34th annual Autumn 
Leaf Festival opened last Sat- 
urday, Sept. 26, at 8:30 a.m., 
with the Farmers Market. 
TTiis was the beginning of the 
activities planned by the 
Chamber of Commerce for 
this wedc's celebration of Aut- 
unm. 

As vendors sold their 
games, rides, and a variety of 
foods, observers pounded the 
pavement eating fudge, 
cakes, pretzels and pop. They 
peered through store windows 
at the display of leaves. TTie 
contest for the best display 
was won by Dittman Fabrics. 
Residents of Clarion, visitors 
and alunmi of Clarion Univer- 
sity were eager for the week's 
events. Alumni from all over 
the country came back for the 
festival. A former student of 
Clarion said, "ALF is one of 
my fondest memories of my 
days here at Qarion." Beth, a 
current student at Clarion 
said, "I look forward to ALF 
every year. Ihere are a lot of 
parties to go to." 

Last year there was an es- 
timated 100,000 people attend- 
ing the festival, according to 
the Clarion Chamber of Com- 
merce. Although ALF brings 



many people to Clarion, many 
stay in their rooms. Alexis 
Kern, an employee at the Cap- 
tain Loomis Hotel, said, 
"There's not enouj^ room to 
accommodate those from out 
of town and there really isn't 
much for them to do. " 

Hotels have been filled up 
since August. Businesses in 
Clarion have flourished. Vicki, 
a cashier at Wilshire's Gift 
Shop, said, "I've seen a signi- 
ficant increase in business 
since Friday." 

On Monday, the events were 
in full progress. The Miss 
Teen Pageant was held and 
the winner was Julie Ritner, a 
sophomore at Keystone High 
School. Ritner also won the 
Outstanding Talent award. 

On Wednesday, the streets 
were covered with shoppers 
looking for big savings at the 
sidewalk sale. 

As the day progressed, the 
anticipation of the weekend 
grew. Even at 54 d^ee tem- 
peratures, the kiddie parade 
went on as promised on Thurs- 
day. Later that evening 
Qarion University chose their 
Homecoming Queen, Vicki 
Amsdell. 

Friday, the flea market and 
the ALF tennis tournament 
kept more visitors busy. The 



students and residents were 
preparing for the big home- 
coming game and parade. 

Saturday morning the 
people lined the streets of 
Clarion for the parade armed 
with their warmest coats, to 
beat the 38-degree tempera- 
ture. The parade began with 
cheers from many students 
and alumni. A graduate from 
the class of 1928 said, "I'm 
here every year, no matter 
what. It brings back the good 
ole'days." 

Bands marched from every 
surrounding town in the area. 
Spectators tapped their feet to 
the sounds of me bands. First 
place in the Class AA march- 
mg bands went to Carlynton 
High School. Other winners 
were: Garion-Limestone and 
Kams aty High School. In the 
Class AAA marching bands 
Hedbank VaUey High School 
took first place with no other 
entries. Open class marching 
bands, Elderton received first 
place with Grove City in se- 
cond and Dayton in third. 

Many floats threw candy to 
the awaiting children on the 
sidewalks, making their day 
all the more complete. Some 
of the winning floats were 
Keystone Tall Tree Girls, tak- 
ing first place, Union High 



Petitions for candidates available 



by Suzanne Halleman, 
News Staff Writer 



At Tuesday's Student Sen- 
ate meeting. President Kent 
O'Neil reported that the Fac- 
ulty Senate will be holding an 
open hearing on Tuesday, Oct. 
27 concerning the first day of 
classes being on the same day 
as registration. This is a 
major concern ot students be- 
cause they must stand in line 
to register which makes them 
late for class. It is suggested 
that students attend this hear- 
ing to voice their opinion. 



Under the elections commit- 
tee, petitions for candidates 
for Student Senate were made 
available Wednesday. Also, 
voting on the amendments of 
student senators will be held 
October 13. The proposed 
amendments must be 
approved by two-thirds ma- 
jority of the senate to be plac- 
ed on the Student Senate elec- 
tions ballot. Then they will be 
adopted into the amendment 
of the CSA constitution. 

Public Relations Committee 
will have posters out this week 



WANTED' 



NEWS 

AND 

SPORTS 

WRITERS 

CALL 

2380 




promoting Student Senate and 
their meetings. Also under 
Public Relations Committee, 
Senators Tim Murray and Bill 
Kapalka will speak on October 
13 about Student Senate to a 
GS 110 class. They will ad- 
dress what Student Senate is, 
what the senators' responsib- 
ilities are, and how Student 
Senate works for the students. 

Under old business. Senator 
Kim Acquaro adked Dr. Cur- 
tis if he could set up a meeting 
to explain and discuss the sub- 
ject of the removal of little sis- 
ters from the fraternities. He 
agreed to set one up. 

The next Student Senate 
meeting is Tuesday, Oct. 13 at 
7 o'clock in room 140 Peirce. 



School, with second j^ace and 
Owens-niinois and The Area 
Agency on Aging for third and 
fourth places. The best parade 
float was Keystone Tall Tree 
Girl Scouts. 

There were many other 
floats beside those mentioned 
above. There was the Lucky 
Twirlers who do-se-doed to 
Conway Twitty. A float of 
clowns playing instruments 
got everyone's attention, and 
not too far behind were other 
clowns and familiar faces like 
Bugs Bunny, Daffy Duck, and, 
of course, AJf came for ALF. 
Another highlight of the par- 
ade was the Jaffa Unit, rid- 
ing their tiny motorcycles and 
doing semi-wheelies. 

Once the parade was over, 
many headed down main 
street to the football stadium 
to watch the long-awaited 
homecoming game between 
the Slippery Rock Rockets 
and the Golden Eagles. By 
half-time cheers were heard 
up to 4th and Main Street. The 
victory over the Rockets only 
increased everyone's school 
spirit. As one of the members 



from the stands yelled, "We 
are Golden." 

Tlie last day of the Autumn 
Leaf Festival ended with the 
34th annual Autorama. There 
were 235 automobiles on dis- 
play, some from as early as 
the 1900's to the 1970's. Ob- 
servers admired and gawked 
while the proud owners 
gleamed and chatted about 
ttieir most prized possession. 

Charles Greenwald, owner 
of a bright red 1968 Chevy, 
said, "I grew up with this car. 
It's a part of my past. I 
remember when there were 
big things happening then. My 
generation was one that was 
going to change the world, and 
this car never lets me forget 
that." Others bragged about 
how they have spent as much 
as $3,000 or $4,000 in just one 
year on their car. 

By 7 p.m. cars began to tra- 
vel out of Main Street on to Rt. 
322. ITie streets were cleared 
from the autorama, and the 
li^ts from the carnival were 
no more. Qarion was left with 
having another successful 
Autumn Leaf Festival. 




WftWft:ft%:sWft:::ft%%^^ 



/^fflRES 



I 



Cuddle someone 90 Merle St., Clarion I 

with flowers! 226-7070 I 



^¥S::WSft%WftWi?S%%%^ 



The Sisters of 
ALPHA SIGMA ALPHA 

would like to congradulate the 
Fall Pledge Class of 1987 



Patti O'Neill 
Laurie Tower 
Jill Moyer 
Tracy Howard 
Julianna Ruther 



Karen Beebe 
Therese Weunski 
Batti Barr 
Deana Vassel 
Leslie Ludall 




The Sisters of 

Delta Zeta 



are proud to announce 
the PALL PLEDGE CLASS OF '87 







Joy Britcher 
Nikki Green 
Vicki Hoffman 
Michelle Jordan 
Karena McCarthy 



Joanne Judy 
Lisa Walker 
Tammy Winegardner 
Stephanie Waytko 
Cindy Zwick 



Congratulations! We love you! 



► 








THE CLARION CALL, Clarion, PA, Thursday, Oct. 8, 1987—9 

Dropouts likely to 
default on loans 



Good to the last drop. 



.Two visitors to the ALF carnival watch as their puppy tries to finish its drink. 

Photo by Frank Lotito, Staff Photographer 



Kahn chairs panel on Asian studies 



Dr. Mohammad I. Khan, of history. During his sabbati- 

professor of history at Qarion cal leave during the fall se- 

University of Pennsylvania, mester of 1986, he visited 

will be chairing a panel and many states in India coUect- 

presenting a paper during the ing material and mterviewing 



New York Conierence on As 
ian Studies at the State Uni- 
versity of New York, Brock- 
port College, New York, Oct. 

Khan is chairing the panel 
on "Minorities in India Today: 
Rights and Obligations." His 



people on contemporary is- 
sues of historical significance 
in addition to serving as a 
visiting professor of history at 
the Center for Graduate Stu- 
dies, Imphar, Manipur. 

Participating on Kahn's 
panel are: J. Paul Martin, di- 



oaper is titied"Ae Concept of rector. Center for Hunian 



Freedom in Afghanistan: His 
torical Perspectives." It will 
be presented during the panel 
discussion, "Crisis in Afghan- 
istan: What Ues in the Fu- 
ture?" 



Rights, Columbia University, 
New York City; Laxmi 
Berwa, President of the Inter- 
national Federation of Dalit 
Organization Inc., Landover, 
Md.; Abulhassan Ansari, 



KaAm joined the faculty at Washington, B.C.; Gurcharan 
CUP in 1968 as a full professor Singh, Marymount Manhattan 



Classified Ads 



ROOMS FOR RENT near Campus. 
Sublease - available Oct. 13 thru 
Dec. Rooms available Spring 
Semester and Summer. For more 
information 226-5647. 

EARN Ihiuidred weeklyl in your 
spare time. United Services of 
America is looking for home work- 
ers to perform mail services. In- 
centive programs available. For 
information send large self-ad- 
dressed stamped envelope to 
U.S.A. 24307 Magic Mtn. Pkwy., 
Suite No. 306. Valencia, CA 91355. 

The Brothers of Phi Sigma Kappa 
would like to congratulate Kappa 
Delta Rho and Zeta Tau Alpha on 
placing first m the float competi- 
tion!!! 

TELEPHONE AND STEREO IN- 
STALLATION: Home, Car, Mo- 
bile, etc. Also minor electrical re* 
pairs and wiring. Call Now fcM* Es- 
timates. BILL 226-4099. 

On Campus Travel Representative 
or Organization Needed to Pro- 
mote Spring Break Trip to Ftor- 
ida. EARN MONEY, FREE 
TRIPS, AND VALUABLE WORK 
EXPERIENCE. Call Inter-Cam- 
pus Programs 1-800-433-7747. 

HOMEWORKERS WANTED!! 
TOP PAY!! C.I. 121 24th Ave., 
N.W. Suite 222, Norman, OK 73069. 



PHOTOGRAPHY STAFF: I would 
like to thank you for your endless 
effort and dedication last week 
for ALF - your pic's were great! 
from your beloved edito r. 

To the Sisters of DELTA PMI EP- 
SILON: Congratulations on your 
initiation and may your success 
always continue! ! ! Love, the Sis- 
ters of PHI SIGMA SIGMA. 

PHI SIGMA SIGMA sorority would 
like to thank the brothers of SIG- 
IVIA CHI for the great time we had 
last wedi at Pledge Pick-Up. 

SURPLUS CARS sell for $155 (aver- 
age)! Also jeeps, trucks etc. Now 
Available. Your area. Info 8(6- 
687-6000, Ext. S^S334. 

CUP STUDENTS RECEIVE 10% 
DISCOUNT ON ALL SMITH-COR- 
ONA TYPEWRITER SUPPLIES. 

CLARION OFFICE EQUIPMENT, 
Rt. 66 South, 226-8740. AUTHORIZ- 
ED SCM DEALER. 

Hey Rod Fye!!! Happy 19th B-Day. 
Friends Always, Arlene, Dina, 
Jeff. Rod. 

TOE JAM '87 



College, New York City; Bar- 
bara Joshi, Genesco, N.Y., 
and Parmatma Saran, Ba- 
ruch College, New York City. 

One of the highlights of the 
conference is the Ambassa- 
dors' Session on "South Asia's 
Current Problems and Pros- 
pects." Participating ambas- 
sadors are: Susanta De Alvis, 
Sri Lanka; P. K. Kaul, India; 



(CPS) — College dropouts 
are more likely to default on 
Guaranteed Student Loans 
than students who complete 
their education, according to a 
study by the University of Cal- 
ifornia at Los Angeles. 

Black students, students 
from low-income backgrounds 
and students who dropped out 
of high school also are more 
likely to default on loans, 
UCLA professor Wellford 
Wilms found. 

In a study of more than 6,000 
students at community 
colleges and vocational 
schools on the West Coast in 
1965, Wilms found that 38 per- 
cent of students who dropped 
out later defaulted on loans. 

Wilms' study, mandated by 
the California state legislature 
and funded by the state stu- 
dent aid commission, did not 
study defaulters' motivations. 

Wilms' study focused exclu- 
sively on community colleges 
and vocational schools, he 
said, since they have the high- 
est percentage of defaulters. 

College dropouts, Wilms 
speculated, '^either didn't 
have what it took or the pro- 



A.Z.M. Obidullah Khan, Bang- gram was not what they had 
ladesh; Jamshed Marker, goped for. They became dis- 



Pakistan, and 
Pradhan, Nepal 



Bishwa couraged and didn't pay back 
what mey owed." 



Defaulters from low-income 
families, he said, "don't have 
the ability or desire to py 
back loans." Blacks, Wilms 
theorized, may not pay back 
student loans because they 
are among the most disen- 
chanted and disenfranchised 
members of society. "Blacks 
receive the lowest earnings 
and face the most discrimina- 
tion in the job market," he 
said. 

Wilms also determined that 
U.S. citizens are more likely to 
default than students from 
other countries attending 
school in the United States. 

"I'm not an enemy of the 
GSL program," Wilms 
explained. "It's a good pro- 
gram, an important one." But 
the loan pro-am, he said, dis- 
courages students from at- 
tending graduate schools be- 
cause they balk at the debts 
they accrued during their un- 
dergraduate studies. 

To improve the program, 
Wilms suggests schools con- 
tinue to provide loan counsel- 
ing to students. Loans, he said, 
should be dispersed in smaller 
amounts to keep a tight rein 
on the money. 

Schools that abuse the GSL 
program, he said, "should be 
.kicked out of the program. 



Vote for your favorite 

Daily Special 
and win 7 free specials 

Oct. 8 -28 

Remember our Gyro Special 

for only $2 ■wU 

Fresh Orange Juice 



is coming 



^•. 



Downstairs Reimer 
226-2406 



Call-ins 
Welcome 



10-THE CLARION CALL, Clarion, PA, Thursday, Oct. 8, 1987 



Cousteau team member comes to CUP 



By Tom Leitch 
Features Staff Writer 



David Brown, a member of 
the Cousteau expedition 
team, whose experiences in- 
clude scuba diving off the 
Caribbean, an expedition to 
Alaska, and whale training, 
will speak at CUP, Thursday, 
Oct. 8, 1987. The lecture will 
be in Marwick-Boyd Auditor- 
ium and admission is free. 
The appearance is sponsored 
by Center Board. The pre- 
sentation is at 8: 15 p.m. 

Brown was born in Louis- 
ville, KY. His parents were 
from New England and 
Brown spent his early years 
near the ocean. He moved to 
Holland with his parents at 
age 6 and then to the Finger 
Lakes region of upstate New 
York. Here, among the un- 



spoiled lakes and streams, 
David developed skills in 
canoeing, sailing and snork- 
elling. He also developed a 
sense of how beautiful and 
fragile the water system is. 
As a certified SCUBA diver, 
he had the opportunity to 
dive off the Caribbean for 
four consecutive winters. 
Here, encountering such 
animals as dolphins and 
moray eels, he became 
aware of the variety of life on 
a tropical reef. This exper- 
ience reinforced his convic- 
tion that the diverse and de- 
licate marine system must 
be protected. In the summer 
of 1982 David was recruited 
by an independent research 
group to study humpback 
whales. He worked with that 
group for three seasons as a 
researcher, naturalist and 
photographer. He also 



earned a Coast Guard 
Marine Operators license for 
vessels up to 75 tons. 

After completing his stud- 
ies at Cornell University in 
1983, David traveled on a re- 
search vessel and then work- 
ed a series of sailing vessels 
throughout the Caribbean. 
He also worked briefly as a 
whale trainer. David was 
about to head to the Mediter- 
anean when the Costeau 
Society offered him a chance 
to work for them as lecturer 
and as a member of their 
expedition team. Brown has 
been a part of expeditions to 
Hubbard Glacier in Alaska 
and the recent three-to-five 
year expeditions titled 
"Rediscovery of the World." 
The expeditions are planned 
to examine already charted 
waters and the result of man- 
kinds interaction. 



Aptitude test scores level off 



(CPS)— Minority students 
scored higher than ever on 
this year's college aptitude 
tests, while other students es- 
sentiaUy held their own, re- 
ports from the sponsors of the 
SAT (Scholastic Aptitude 
Tests) and American College 
Testing (ACT) tests showed 
lastw^. 

But the highest scorers, re- 
ports showed, once again 
tended to be wealthy, male 
and white. 

Generally, ACT scores 
showed little change from last 
year, while SAT scores have 
been stable for 3 years. 

Average SAT verbal scores 
among students who are this 
year's freshmen were 430, 
down 1 point form 1986, while 
the math average score rose 1 
point to 476, the College Board 
reported. 

The average composite ACT 
score in 1987 was 18.7, down 
0.1 percent from 1986 
averages. 

As the national averages 
scores stayed the same, 
however, black students im- 
proved on their scores. 

On the SATs, black test 
takers raised their average 
verbal score from 346 in 1985 
to 351 in 1987. Average math 
scores rose 1 point, from 376 to 
377. 



Black ACT takers averaged 
13.4 in 1987, up for 13.0 in 1966. 
White students averaged 19,7, 
and Asian-Americans 19.8 

As always, there was absol- 
utely no agreement just what 
the scores meant. 

U.S. Secretary of Education 
William J. Bennett thought 
they were "good news," 
though "we're still seeing an 
insufficient payoff for what 
we've invested in education. 
We need better results. We 
need accountability for re- 
sults." 

"The increasing number of 
students taking the SAT is an 
encouraging sign since it 
means &t a great many 
more students are actuallv 
considering going to college,^' 
said Donald M. Stewart, pre- 
sident of the CoUege Board. 

But at the same time, Ste- 
wart termed the results "not 
dramatic." 

In general, average appi- 
tude test scores began falling 
in 1967, and didn't stop untS 
1961. 

Observers explained the 
long decline with a variety of 
theories ranging from less- 
rigorous high schools to the 
shrinking size of families to 
the atmospheric testing of nu- 
clear weapons through 1963. 

Bennett continued to blame 



Tax workshop set 



A workshop entitled "Tax 
Implications for the Self-Em- 
ployed or Independent Con- 
tractors" will beheld on TTiurs- 
day, Nov. 19, at the DuBois 
Holiday Inn. The workshop is 
sponsored by the Small Bus- 
iness Development Center and 
the Internal Revenue Service, 
in conjunction with the U.S. 
Small Business Administra- 
tion. 

Topics to be discussed in- 
clude: Schedule C, Estimated 
Taxes. Form 1040, and 



Federal Tax Deposit Cards. 
The seminar is scheduled 
from 8:30 a.m. to 3:45 p.m., 
with check-in beginning at 8 
a.m. 

TTiere is a $20 fee, which in- 
cludes lunch and materials. 
Because of space limitations 
for this workshop, pre-reg- 
istration is preferred. More in- 
formation and registration 
forms can be obtained by call- 
ing the Small Business De- 
vdopment Center at (814) 226- 
2060. 



high schools for failing to pre- 
pare students to take tibe t^ts, 
while the College Board itself 
saw 1987's results as a re- 
flection of the number of stu- 
dents taking the test. 

'The more kids that take 
the test, the greater the varie- 
tv of students and the lower 
the scores," noted College 
Board spokesman Fred 
Moreno. 

The number of students 
taking the test in 1987 rose 8 
percent. 

Board research chief 
Robert Cameron added, 
"There's no doubt that the stu- 
dents who take more challeng- 
ing courses in high school tend 
to do better on the test. " 

Indeed, ACT director of 
minority education Samuel D. 
Cargile credited better hijgh 
school preparation for the rise 
in minority scores. 

"Over the past several 
years, the proportion of ACT- 
tested students from minority 
groups taking a core hijpi 
school curriculum has in- 
creased noticeably," Cargile 
said. 

Nevertheless, wealthy, 
white male test takers stiU 
outperformed other students.^ 

Students with family 
incomes more than $70,000, 
averaged 523 math and 471 
verbal on the SAT. Students 
whose families had incomes of 
less than $10,000 had average 
scores of 416 math and 364 
verbal. 

"The continued large 
gender gap on both the SAT 
and ACT indicates there are 
still serious flaws in both 
exams," asserted John Weiss, 
executive director FairTest. 

If test results were consist- 
ent with other measures of 
academic merit like high 
school and college grades, 
girls would score me same as 
or even slightly bett^ than 
boys." 




DAVID BROWN — A member of the Cousteau expedition team, will iec- 
ture in Marwick-Boyd tonight at 8:15. Clarion Call File Photo 

Gurecka to conduct 
Maine workshop 

Louis Gurecka, assistant 
professor and chairman of 
special educaiton at Clarion 
University of Pennsylvania,^ 
will conduct a seminar, "Re- ' 
spite Care: Support for Per- 
sons With Developmental Dis- 
abilities and Their Families," 
at the Third Northeast Inter- 
national Symposium on Ex- 
ceptional Children and Youth, 
Oct. 7-9 in Bangor, Maine. 

More than 1,500 special ed- 
ucation professionals from the 
United States and Canada are 
expected to attend. Gurecka is 
one of 165 special education 
professionals who will present 
workshops at this internation- 
al symposium. 

The symposium wiU provide 
participants with an oppor- 
tunity to address common 
issues facing professionals 
and parents in providing ap- 
propriate services for except- 



ional children and youth, and 
upgrade their own 
professional skills. 

Thirteen departments of ed- 
ucation and professional or- 
ganizations in northern New 
England and Atlantic Canada 
will host the events including: 
the Maine, New Brunswick, 
New Hampshire, Newfound- 
land, Nova Scotia, Prince Ed- 
ward Island, and Vermont De- 
partments of Education; the 
Atlantic Provinces Special 
Education Authority; Division 
of Mental Retardation of the 
International Council for Ex- 
ceptional Children; the Maine 
Association of Directors of 
Services for Exceptional 
Children; Maine and Nova 
Scotia Federations of the 
Council for Expecptional 
Children; and the Maine 
Speech-Language and 
Hearing Association. 



HO!P^." 



t t 



THE CLARION CALL, Clarion, PA, Thursday, Oct. 8, 1967-1 1 



One of the best 



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CUP Band renown for its excellence 



by Vicki Schreiber, 

Features Staff Writer 

Have you always wanted to 
hear "A Tribute to Great Per- 
formers?" If so, you're in 
luck. That just happens to be 
one of the fine renditions the 
Clarion University Golden 
Ea^e Band is performing this 
season. 

Ttie CUP Bands, under the 
direction of Dr. Stanley F. 
Midialski, Jr., are renown for 



their exceUaice in perform- 
ance, both on the football field 
and concert stage. 

Also behind the scenes, as- 
sisting Dr. MichalsM is Mr. 
Schmidt, instructor of Percus- 
sion and Assistant Conductor 
of Bands at Clarion. Mr. 
Schmidt is also the Musical 
Director of the Percussion 
Ensemble and teaches 
Applied Percussion and Per- 
cussion Techniques. 

Tlie Golden Eagle Marching 



Band, which has been selected 
from over 250 talented stu- 
dents, has gained the reputa- 
tion as one of the best and 
largest university bands in 
Pennsylvania, with 100 
playing musicians. This 
year's elected drum major is 
Michael Sexauer. 

Accompanying the Golden 
Ea^e Marching Band will be 
the Majorette Corps. This 
year. Dr. Michalski has 




In Training. . . .A group of alumni are shown at a summer workshop held at Clarion University of Pennsylvania de- 
signed to train them for recruiting students for CUP. From far right to left around the table are: Doug Weisner of 
Harrisburg; Joyce Marburgerof Baltimore, Md.; Michael Plashaof Huntingdon Valley; Paula Knapp of Oil City; Laurel 
Stevens of Pittsburgh; Robert DiMichele of Hampton, Va., and Darlene DiMlchele of Hampton, Va. 

Students receive scholarships 



Two Clarion University of 
Pennsylvania students, Rose 
Boyer of New Bethlehem and 
Sandra McCord of Clarion 
have received the Jospeh F. 
and Susannah Centorcelli 
Scholarship for 1987-88. 

The scholarshp was estab- 
lished by Joseph C. Centorcelli 
in memory of his wife, Susan- 
nah, through the Clarion Uni- 
versity Foundation. Two re- 
cipients, one in English and 
one in speech communication 
and theatre, are selected each 



year to receive a $350 scholar- 
ship. Applicants must have at 
least sophomore standing and 
a 3.0 quality point average. 
Candidates are interviewed 
and required to demonstrate 
their awareness of citizenship 
responsibilities and hope for 
their career, 

Boyer, a junior secondary 
education / communication 
arts major, is from 514 Wood 
St., New Bethlehem. She has a 
son, Mark, and is a daughter 
of Dorothy Michiline, 418 



Washington St., New Bethle- 
hem. She is a graduate of Red- 
bank VaUey ffigh School, New 
Bethlehem. 

McCord, a senior English 
major, is from 9 Maronee St., 
Clarion. She is married to 
Alan B. McCord, who is sta- 
tioned at Ft. Rucker, 
Alabama. She is a daughter of 
Lee and Pauline Cleveland, 
Troy RD 1 and a graduate of 
Troy High School. 



I* It •««<H»**»'* 




chosen Christine Schnur to 
serve as head majorette, with 
Melissa Leali as our Golden 
Girl for the '87 season. 

Performing along with the 
majorettes will be the Silk 
Squad, headed by Patty Pocta 
and Shron Scully, this year's 
co-captains. 

Several entertaining half- 
time shows are being 
performed by the band, 
majorettes and silk squad. 
Themes and fitting music are 
scheduled, including "The Bi- 
centennial for the Constitu- 
tion," "Music Around Amer- 
ica" and the piece mentioned 
earlier. 

This year. Band Alumni 
Day, an annual event, has 
been scheduled to be on Octo- 
ber 24. Approximately 60 
alumni have indicated they 
will return and perform 
during half-time of the 
Clarion-East Stroudsburg 
game that day. 

Band Parents Day has been 
set for November 7. The 
festivities will include a fihn 
presentation of previous 
shows, attendance to the foot- 
ball game, and a post-game 
concert at the stadium, with 
the Marching Band Revue 
performing that same 
evening, at 8:15 in Marwick- 
Boyd Auditorium. During the 
revue, a complete musical ex- 



hibition will be rendered and a 
recording of the performance 
can be made for anyone in- 
terested. 

Another entertaining aspect 
of the band program is the 
aarion University Symphonic 
Band, composed of 80 wind 
and percussion players. Its 
musical objectives are to at- 
tain perfection in both per- 
formance ability and individ- 
ual musicianship. 

TTie first Spring Concert this 
year will be held on February 
29, with the annual President's 
Concert being on May 1. 

The Symphonic Band's first 
tour will be from April 10-12, 
when they will be touring and 
performing concerts in the 
Southwestern New York area. 

Two honorary band so- 
cieties were created in May 
1970 — Tau Beta Sigma, Na- 
tional Honorary Band Sorority 
and Kappa Kappa Psi, Na- 
tional Honorary Band Frater- 
nity. These function as service 
groups to assist with the plan- 
ning of the bands. They also 
help to develop the interest 
and appreciation of the bands 
here at Clarion. 

Thanks to the hard work 
and dedication of all involved 
with the Clarion University 
Bands we all can enjoy their 
high quality playing. Keep lis- 
tening and tapping your toes. 



Grads to recruit 
potential students 

... <■ ■■ a 1 • « j^-% • y«^n.V ^ P Y^ _1J.* "W IT Jl 



Sixteen additional Clarion 
University of Pennsylvania 
graduates are now partici- 
pating in the recruiting of po- 
tential students for CUP. 
These graduates join a group 
from last year in a program 
designed by the CUP Ad- 
missions Office. 

The attend summer work- 
shops to give instructions in 
methods of assisting CUP in 
contacting potential students 
on an informal basis and how 
to represent CUP at college 
fairs in their home areas. 

Attending the sessions 
were: 

Robert ('81) and Darlene 
('82) DiMichele of Hampton, 
Va.; Paula Y. Knapp ('85) of 
Oil City; Joyce Marburger 



('79) of Baltimore, Md.; 
Nancy Moore ('83) of Lake- 
wood, Ohio; Michael Plasha 
('85) of Huntington Valley; 
Mark Shoaf ('85) of Sarver; 
Laurel Stevens ('86) of Pitts- 
burgh; and Douglas Weisner 
('74) of Harrisburg. 

Joining the program but not 
attending the sessions were: 
Don Andrekovich ('56) of Du- 
Bois; DanDevine ('80) of Pal- 
mer; Edward Frack ('83) of 
Schencksville; Archie 
Schenviyville; Archie Pal- 
more ('75) of Washington, 
D.C.; Tina Reuter ('85) of 
Philadelphia; Michael 
Philadelphia; Michael Robin- 
son ('82) of Philadelphia; and 
Joan Vicari (78) of Ocean 
aty, N.J. 



CLARION FROZEN FOOD LOCKER 

it Sausage Breakfast Patties 2 lb / $3.90 

• Italian Style Hot Sausage $1.95 lb. 

it Stuffed Chicken Breasts $1.65 e^ch 

it Beef Cubes (stew) $1.55 lb. 

• Beef Hamburg Patties 4 lb. box / $6.80 



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IS 01 



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PH. 814-226-7411 OR 814-379^58 
984 CORBETT STREET 




12-THE CLARION CALL, Clarion, PA, Thursday, Oct. 8, 1987 



/. 




Is this the Indy? Miniature car drivers captivate the audience as they perform various maneuvers. 



Photo by line 



Univ. 'disenrolls' student 



ROCHESTER, N.Y. (CPS) 
The University of Rochester, 
bowing to pressure from the 
Eastman Kodak Company, 
"disenrolled" a student who 
worked for the Fuji Photo 
Film Company because he 
would have shared business 
classes with Kodak employees. 

Kodak, whose corporate 
headquarters are in Roches- 
ter, is one of the university's 
largest corporate benefactors. 

While campus officials said 
they kicked Tsuneo Sakai out 
of the classes to allow 90-some 
students from Kodak to 
"share freely" ideas in the 
courses, critics of the decision 
say it seriously compromises 
Rochester's autonomy, chills 
academic discussion, and 
makes an American campus 
into the conference room of a 
corporation. 

A university is not a place 
for secrecy," contended Jon- 
athan Knight of the American 
Association of University Pro- 
fessors, which monitors aca- 
demic freedom at the nation's 
colleges and universities. 

"This implies that it's okay 
for you to do background 
checks on students before you 
let them in your class. " 

"It's an old story in Ameri- 
can education," said Knight. 
"Wealthy, powerful benefac- 
tors bring pressure upon uni- 
versities and colleges. - 

Sakai, a Japanese student 
who worked for Fuji, Kodak's 
main rival in the film and 
camera business, enrolled in 
Rochester's William E. Simon 
Graduate School of Business 
Administration earlier this 
year. 

When Kodak officials 
learned Sakai planned to 
attend courses, they persuad- 
ed the university to disenroU" 
him, said UR spokeswoman 
Jan Fitzpatrick. 

Rochester then arranged 
for Sakai to attend the Mass- 
achussetts Institute of Techno- 
logy this fall, she said. 

"Kodak was very concerned 
that, in a classroom setting 
where students are encourag- 
ed to discuss real-life pro- 



blems, a student from a chief 
competitor would pose a real 
threat to proprietary informa- 
tion," Fitzpatrick explained. 

Rochester officials feared 
Sakai's presence would inhibit 
classroom discussion, 
Fitzpatrick said. 

In a prepared statement, 
UR President Dennis O'Brien 
said he'd acted to avoid com- 
promising "the integrity of the 
classroom, in which students 
share freely their own under- 
standing of the subject matter 
gained through their own ex- 
perience." 

"This is truly an extraord- 
inary case," O'Brien stated. 
"The objection to the indivi- 
dual was not a matter of ideo- 
logy or normal business rival- 
ry. It was based on the judge- 
ment that his presence at the 
school could present an im- 
mediate and material threat 
to the legimate proprietary in- 
terests of the Kodak Com- 
pany." 

"In a business so fiercely 
competitive, even a casual 
conversation could result in 
the competitor receiving sen- 
sitive information," 
Fitzpatrick added. 

"We didn't tell the univer- 
sity what to do," said Kodak 
spokesman Ron Roberts. "But 
we felt it was best to express 
our concerns." 

Both Kodak and Rochester 
say the company's financial 
gifts to the umversity were not 
discussed during the month- 
mng conversations about 
Sakai's future at the 
university. 

Yet money is always hang- 
ing over their heads," said 
Susan Calhoun of the Wash- 
ington D.C.-based Council on 
Foundations, which tracks 
corporate donations. 

Kodak contributed $600,000 
to the University of Rochester 
last year, Fitzgerald said, and 
"certainly is one of the most 
important donors to the uni- 
versity." 

Kodak's contributions were 
not a "direct factor" in the 
decision to disenroll Sakai, 
Fitzpatrick said. '*But 



because Kodak has been so 
generous, the university felt 
obliged to give a serious lis- 
tening to Kodak's fears. ' ' 

Nevertheless, Fitzpatrick 
maintained, "This decision 
does not represent some kind 
of policy or set any precedent 
for the future. We're an open 
institution. We'll continue to 
observe an open attitude in 
our admissions policy." 

Dr. Mark Frankel of the 
American Association for the 
Advancement of Science, 
however, said Rochester's de- 
cision to disenroll Sakai is 
"absurd." 

"If obtaining information is 
his motive," said Frankel of 
Sakai, "there's no reason he 
couldn't get it without 
attending a class. 

"I'm not sure why Kodak 
employees would be afraid of 
dropping information in the 
classroom, " Frankel said. 

Executive privy to sensitive 
corporation information, he 
said, should be smart enough 
to realize what information is 
sensitive and how to keep that 
within the company. "I'm 
bothered by their paranoia." 

"I think the issue here is the 
autonomy and independence 
of the institution," Knight said 
of Rochester. "Who they may 
admit for study is now influ- 
enced by an external agent. 
The university becomes part 
of that external agent. ' ' 

"The problem for the uni- 
versity," he continued, "is not 
the role of Kodak but its own 
self -conception of what should 
happen in the classroom. 
There's supposed to be frank 
discussion. The classroom is 
the one place you expect 
people to be candid. The 
student isn't the one creating 
the chilling effect, the univer- 
sity is." 

"Is the university," asked 
Knight, "trying to protect its 
students, or is it trying to pro- 
tect its relationship with 
Kodak?" 



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Newspapers play 
significant role 



National Newspaper Week each year 
offeis us an oppoitunity to recognize the 
unique and significant role newspapers 
play in helping to foster and preserve the 
lights and lAioties of hee citizens in our 
hee society. 

It is particularly fitting this year— the 
200th anniversary of our Constitution— 
to reflect on the wisdom of our nation's 
founding fathers in lecognizing the re- 
sponsibility of a free, indq)endent and 
unrestramed press to provide informa- 
tion that Qves ixe, citizens the means to 
make informed and responsible deci- 
sions. 

In the words of James Madison, 
"Nothing could be more inational than 
to fgNt ^ people power, ami to with- 
hold from them information. . . " 

In the United States each day more 
than 400,000 newspaper men and wom- 
en go about their jobs writing, editing, 
printing and distributing news and infor- 
mation to their fellow citizens; their 
neighbors, Bends, relatives, countrymea 

Simply defined, and I believe in keep- 
ing widi the spirit of our Constitution, 
newspapers are basically people serving 
people; providing not only news and in- 
formation with which to evaluate signifi- 
cant, k)cal, national and intemadonal 
events, but also facts, opinions, advertise- 
ments, schedules, advice and other infor- 
mation to help people plan and conduct 
their daily lives, to lead better lives, safely, 
and successfully. 

Newspaper people, keenly aware of 
the high degree of responsibility they bear 
as guardians of the peoples' right to fiee- 



TOUttCWSPAm 

PEOPLE 

SERVING 

PEOPLE 




dom of the press, strive hard to fulfill that 
responsibility. 

And we must continue to give our 
very best to improve our performance, to 
produce the best newspaper within our 
capabilitks, to provide the information 
and analysis our readers want and need 
to make responsible, intelligent and eff ec- 
tivededsbns. 

We who are privileged to work in the 
newspaper business aoaspt our responsi- 
bilities and daily challenges and will con- 
tinue to strive to improve our perform- 
ance by upgrading the professional com- 
petence of our people; our reporters, edi- 
tors, managers, production, sales and dis- 
tribution people— and by utilizing the 
latest tcrhnologcal advances in collect- 
ing, storing, printing and distributing ac- 
curate and timely information to our 
readers as ef fidendy as possible. 

As we observe National Newspaper 
Week, we take this opportunity to pay 
tribute to the dedicated newspaper people 
who, in the performance of their daily 
jobs, actually make our free press the 
unique and effective democratic instru- 
ment our founding fathers envisioned. 

Your newspaper, people serving peo- 
ple, q>itomizes the spirit and intent of 
our Constitutional heritage of a free press 
serving to protect the rights, fieedoms 
and security of free citizens in our free 
society. 



U George W.Wilson 

Chairman and President 

American Newspaper 

Publishers Association 



THE/5^ IT IS, ^H\B. 
OUR 

FEopLS 




• -. - T«AVB5 



THE CLARION CALL, Clarion, PA, Thursday, Oct. 8, 1987-13 







FEATURES 



The winner is...Vicky Amsdell 



by Maria Kapsak, 
Features Editor 



Yellow and blue balloons 
and many roses decorated 
Vicky Amsdell's room. Who is 
this Viclty Amsdell? She's the 
1987 Homecoming Queen. 

"TWs is an accomplishment 
for me, something I never ex- 
pected." This was the initial 
reaction when they 
announced her Queen Thurs- 
day night at the dance. She's 
been on cloud nine ever since. 
What kept her on that cloud? 
The crowd at the parade on 
Saturday afternoon. As she 
passed by the streets of Clar- 
ion, under her canopy of yel- 



low and blue pahns, people of 
all ages waved from the side- 
walks. 

Vicky, sponsored by RAC's 
(Returning Adult Commuter 
Students), received some 
beautiful presents from Ve- 
nango Campus, the Clarion 
campus and even people she 
doesn't know that well. She be- 
lieves in bemg friendly to 
everyone because it will all be 
worth it in the end. 

Throughout the weekend 
she had friends come up to her 
and say, "You did it Vicky!" 
She replied simply with "No, 
you did it for me." Vicky was 
estatic to see so many people 
congratulating her. 

Homecoming Queen is only 



one of Vicky's accomplish- 
ments. She is involved with 
many activities here on 
campus as well. She is Presi- 
dent of the Management As- 
sociation, a member of: Fi- 
nancial Management Asso- 
ciation, International Associa- 
tion for Business Communica- 
tors, Data Processing Man- 
agement Association, Phi 
Beta Alpha, a honorary for 
business majors and also an 
administrative R.A. in Given 
Hall. 

On the side from campus 
activities Vicky does some 
modeling and singing. She 
won awards from combining 
her two talents. Vicky stated 



that the main reason for get- 
ting into something like this is 
to gain more confidence. "I 
have to overcome the fear of 
getting up in front of people." 
For just starting in June, 
Vicky has noticed a major 
change in her attitude toward 
herself. 

Coming from a caring 
family of 11, Vicky has only 
good things to say about them. 
"They're caring, brilliant and 
loving." She was the only one 
to go to college and pursue a 
career. She said it is "advan- 
tageous to get a degree." That 
is what Vicky will do in De- 
cember, - succeed at obtaining 

a B.A. in Industrial Relations. 
Congratulations Vicky! 




VICKY AMSDELL, 
1987 Homecoming Queen 



''Greater Tuna'': a comedy full of laughs 




by Michael J. Downing 
Features Staff Writer 




*X 



mm 



A sticky situation Joel Walters gives Leo Glen the stick in "Greater Tuna." 



ALF was a huge success 



by Tom Hughes, 
Features Staff Writer 



With the changing autumn 
leaves on the trees of Qarion 
comes a change in the streets 
and the people of Clarion. Dull 
storefront windows are decor- 
ated. Banners are hung in the 
streets. Food booths with a 
wide variety of tastes and 
smells pop up all along Main 
St. A carnival magically ap- 
pears. Some nice professors 
even lighten-up on homework. 
And people — people come 
from all around. Tlus annual 
transformation is the Autunm 
Leaf Festival (ALF). 

Everyone has his or her own 
interpretation of ALF. Some 
associate ALF with food con- 
cessions, parties, carnival 
games and rides, the Auto- 
rama, and of course, the pa- 
rade and the Homecoming 
game. Despite stories they 
may have heard, for most 
fre^imen, ALF is a new ex- 
perience. Freshman Renea 
nounced, the dance became 



Young comments about 
ALF, "I'd heard about it, but I 
didn't know what to expect." 
Another freshman, Kevin For- 
ringer, had heard so many 
hyped-up things about ALF 
that he was a little disappoint- 
ed when the real thing 
happened. He did observe, 
however, that, "It's big for the 
people around here. ' ' 

What better way to swing 
into the ALF spirit than with a 
Homecoming Dance? It 
wasn't a normal CAB's by any 
means. Members of the Cen- 
ter Board Special Events 
Committee were busy 
decorating and setting up re- 
&«5hments before the dance. 
Ttiis was a special occasion in 
which tradition would be brok- 
en and the Homecoming 
Queen would be announced 
before the big game on Satur- 
day. 

As the time grew nearer to 
11 p.m., the mom^t when the 
Homecoming Court would be 
introduced and the Queen an- 



progressively more crowded 
When the music stopped and 
the announcers prepared, 
everyone pushed toward the 
stage in anticipation. After the 
entire court had been intro- 
duced, and the crowd's anti- 
cipation was at its peak, the 
announcer finally announced 
the 1987 Homecoming Queen 
as Vicky Amsdell. Joy, relief, 
or disappointment was felt by 
everyone in different ways. 

When classes ended Friday 
afternoon, students had a 
whole weekend of ALF activi- 
ties to look forward to. The 
weather didn't cooperate well 
and caused the Farmer's and 
Crafts Day display and the 
petting zoo on the courthouse 
lawn to shut down before they 
were scheduled to end. Tlie 
carnival and concessions 
carried on despite the weath- 
er, but business wasn't as 
good as the workers had 
hoped. 

Ttiie uncooperative weather, 

(See ALF. ..Page 19) 



An appealing and creative 
comedy is coming to Clarion 
next week when "Greater 
Tuna" opens in Marwick- 
Boyd Aumtorium on October 
13. Two of the University's 
brightest young actors, Leo 
Glenn and Joel Walters, will 
undergo numerous transfor- 
mations as they each deliver 
10 different roles involving 
rapid change of costume and 
character. 

Showtime is 8: 15 p.m. and is 
free to all students with valid 
I.D. Additional tickets are $4. 

"Greater Tuna" mildly 
carries the "Lake Wobegon 
Days" flavor as it winds its 
way down the streets and 
back alleys of a small town in 
Texas called — you guessed it 
— Tuna, Texas. The play cen- 
ters on radio station OKKK 
and its two backward announc- 
ers. These two personalities 
talk about news, weather, and 
they even host talk shows. The 
action in the radio station al- 
ternates with the lives of the 
people who live in Tuna, 
Texas. 

As a comedy, "Greater 
Tuna" provides "an excellent 
blend of cynicism and buf- 
foonery it's certainly a 

mixture that is appealing to 
university audiences," ac- 
cording to the play's director. 
Dr. Mary Hardwick. She also 
added that the play has uni- 
vereal attraction because it is 
"so fuU of laughs." 

Hardwick is pleased with 
the progress so far, "It is an 
excellent vehicle for show- 
casing acting skills and comic 
abilities," she said. "We have 
two ideal actors in Leo Glenn 



and Joel Walters." 

Both Glenn and Walters 
plan to pursue professional 
acting careers. Between 
them, they have been involved 
in the Clarion University pro- 
ductions of "The Diviners," 
"Tobacco Road," "The Fan- 
tasticks," "Jesus Christ 
Superstar," "The American 
Dream," "You're A Good 
Man Charlie Brown," and 
"The Elephant Man." Their 
most recent performance was 
in "Two Gentlemen of Ve- 
rona," which was produced 
this past spring. 

Hardwick made sure to 
mention all of the behind the 
scenes help that she had with 
the play. Ellen Fulton and Ann 
Edwards are playing a crucial 
role in production as they 
supervise and design the cos- 
tume changes. With all of the 
changing of roles and cos- 
tumes ttiat takes place, the 
procedure has to be carefully 
choreographed. 

Bob Levy has supplied his 
talents in designing the set. 
Sound is by Bruce Koehler. 

Other productions schedul- 
ed for the CUP Theatre Cal- 
endar include: "Play It 
Again, Sam" by Woody Allen 
is scheduled for November 17- 
21. A musical wiU be perform- 
ed February 17-20, 1988 (a se- 
lection has not yet been 
made) . Finally, Henrick 
Gibson's "Ghosts" will round 
out the season on April 19-23, 
1968. 

No student tickets are need- 
ed for the performance. 
Simply show up at the door 
with your I.D. and the rest is 
easy. Non-student tickets can 
be purchased at the ticket win- 
dow in Riemer. 



14-THE CLARION CALL, Clarion, PA, Thursday, Oct. 8, 1987 



THE CLARION CmlL, Clarion, PA, Thursday, Oct. 8, 1987-15 





Photo by Scott Gottschal 



Autumn 



Leaf 



Festival 




Photo by Bruce Cafurello 



it 
1 



Photo by David Schorr 





Photo by Laurie Wilson 



Photo by Frank Lotito 





Photo by Franl< Lotito 




Photo by Ted Fisher 



Photo by Mike Bordo 




Photo by Steve Mc An inch 








y^^-^'. - 



Phoi&by Pat Cooper 



r 



16-THE CLARION CALL, Clarion. PA. Thursday, Oct. 8. 1987 



Introducing. . .Dr. Oonald wnson 



by Kristin Iden, 
Features Staff Writer 



Step aside and meet Dr. 
Donald Wilson of the English 
department; a professor with 
a quirky sense of humor and a 
killer racquetball game. 

Don Wilson has been with 
the Qarion English Depart- 
ment since 1969. He began his 
education in his native Ni- 
agara Falls, N.Y. After 
getting his bachelor's he 
taught for a year in Niagara. 
From there he taught at a 
junior college in the Adiron- 
dacs, and then he went back to 
graduate school. He received 
his master's and his PhD. 
from the State University of 
New York in Buffalo. 

In his 19th year of teaching 
at Clarion, Dr. Wilson hasn't 
found the students changing a 
great deal. When he first 
came to Clarion, he asked 
what the students were like 
and had them described to 
him as "nice kids." In his 
opinion that hasn't changed 
and "I liked Qarion then and 
stiUlikeitnow!" 

The three classes he's 
teaching this fall are English 
Composition, Beginning Crea- 
tive Writing and Literary Ex- 
perience. "Creative Writing is 
my favorite," he smiles. It's 
easy to tell why. 



Dr. Wilson gets to interact 
with the creative writing stu- 
dents on his pet project, Dare, 
the literary magazine. He has 
been with Dare since its incep- 
tion in 1974 and calls it his 
"real baby." The 14th edition 
was published last spring and 
he plans to organize the 15th 
around Hianksgiving. 

Besides the Dare, he tries to 
publish a paper once a year in 
an area he concentrates in - 
mainly composition, Canad- 
ian poetry, or condensations of 
his doctoral dissertation. 

When he's not involved in 
one of his innumerable Eng- 
lish projects, he plays rac- 
quetball. "I love it! CaU me an 
avid racquetball fan. I look 
forward to playing it for the 
rest of my life." In the last 
tournament he played in, he 
played with Dean Cole of the 
Communication Department 
until his lip was split during 
the match and had to forfeit 
the game. "But I'll be back 
next year," he warns. 

Another way he leaves the 
classroom is through reading. 
He admits he reads the clas- 
sics when serious, but he 
believes in escape reading. 
Heinlein, Bradbury, and 
Andre Norton are a few of his 
favorites. 

Dr. Wilson's future plans re- 
volve around Qarion. "Even 




if I hit the lottery big, I'd still 
be here. I have roots here. I 
like the place and I like the 
people." 

Dr. Wilson has two bits of 
advice for students. "The two 
most useful things any under- 
graduate can do, one, learn 



OR. DONALD WILSON 

Photo by 

how to think, because you 
need that for the rest of your 
life, no matter what you do, 
^d as a part of the process, 
teach yourself. Otherwise un- 
dergraduate school is a 
waste." 
It took him a while to learn 



Peter B. McMHIen, Staff Photographer 

it, but his own philosophy is 
what he believes in. "Every- 
body is a teacher and every- 
body is a learner." His atti- 
tude is reflected in class 
where students have the op- 
portunity to learn and teach 
and create a little bit more. 



Movie Review: 



"Dirty Dancing" in tfie 60's? 



by Cindy Karpaw and Ray Tomczak 
Features Staff Writer 

"Dirty Dancing" is a com- 
ing-of-age story focusing on 
Francis "Baby" Houseman 
(Jennifer Gray) and her affair 
with dance instructor Johnny 
Castle. The movie takes place 
during the summer of 1963, 
when the Houseman family 
spends their vacation at Kel- 
lerman's, a mountain resort 
run by Dr. Houseman's friend 
Max. 

Baby is somewhat unusual 
in her family. While her sister 
is a typical rich girl who only 
wants to marry someone suc- 
cessful, and Babys father 
wants her to become a profes- 
sional, such as a doctor or a 
lawyer, her ambitions run 
more toward joining the 
Peace Q)rps. 

After going up to the staff 
quarters one ni^t. Baby sees 
the employees all engaged in 
"dirty dancing" to the tune of 
"Do You Love Me?" by the 
Contours. There she meets 
Johnny, whom she'd had her 
eye on for some time, and he 
teaches her how to move like 
him. 

After this, Baby's involve- 
ment with Johnny and his 



friends grows. She borrows 
money from her father for 
Penny, another dance instruc- 
tor, to have an abortion after 
she becomes pregnant by one 
of the snobbish, college-boy 
waiters. She even goes so far 
as to fill in for Penny during 
Johnny's dance at at another 
hotel. 

Baby's father finds out 
about her involvement with 
these people when Penny suf- 
fers complications from the 
operation and Baby has to get 
her father to treat her. He 
then forbids Baby to have any- 
thing to do with them. She, of 
course, disobejrs him, and she 
and Johnny fall in love. 

From there, the plot moves 
toward the concluding profiic- 
tion number during the annual 
Kellerman's Talent Show. 
Atong the way, Baby teaches 
Johnny to stand up for him- 
self, and her father learns that 
what side of the tracks some- 
one comes from does not de- 
termine what kind of person 
they are. And baby herself has 
discovered her depth of caring 
and concern for omers. 

MR. TOMCZAK: I'U just 
start out by saying that I 
didn't like the movie. I did like 
the dancing scenes, but the 



rest of the movie didn't have 
the same spark. 

MS. KARPAW: I have to 
disagree with you. I thorough- 
ly enjoyed this movie, both the 
dance segments and the act- 
ual story. However, since the 
movie was set in the early 
60's, I couldn't quite relate to 
it as well as I could a more 
modem setting. But once I put 
myself into Baby's place, the 
movie became much more in- 
teresting. 

MR. TOMCZAK: I was 
bored by the movie mostly be- 



cause I found it hard to care 
about the characters. I'm not 
sure if it was the fault of the 
actors or the script, but I just 
couldn't believe in these char- 
acters as real people. They 
seemed to be just a coUection 
of stereotypes. You had the 
dancers from the streets who 
really had hearts of gold; the 
waiters recruited from the 
best colleges who were cold, 
unfeeling jerks; and Max, the 
old-time resort owner la- 
meting the passing of an era. 
Even Baby herself is a stereo- 



type, as the only caring and 
concerned one amidst this 
upper-class indifference. 

MS, KARPAW: I was not 
bored at all with "Dirty Danc- 
ing." Maybe it's just my fe- 
male opinion that, but I 
thought Ms. Gray's perform- 
ance was very sincere. She en- 
abled me to put myself in that 
60's era and feel the confusion, 
joy, and pain that she felt. 
Maybe being female is the 
reason that I enjoyed Patrick 
Swayze's portrayal of Johnny. 

(See Dirty Dancing. . .Page 20) 



P • • PARTY • • • PARTY • • • PARTY • • • PARTY p 

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-COMPLETE— 

FORMAL AND DANCE 
PARTY PACKAGES 

ONE STOP PARTY SHOP 




226-8990 



CLARION MALL 



CLARION, PA. 16214 



• PARTY • • • PARTY. • • PARTY • • • PARTY 



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I 



THE CLARION CALL, Clarion, PA, Thursday, Oct. 8, 1987- 17 



Live from Clarion. ..it's Nora Dunn 



by Barb Donaldson, 
Features Staff Writer 



Her second college per- 
formance ever, live from 
Clarion, it was Nora Dunn of 
the Saturday Night Live cast. 

Introduced as Babette, the 
French international "sex kit- 
ten," Dunn continued to por- 
tray other characters such as, 
Pat Stevens. Estelle, and 
JoAnn, that she is known for 
onSNL. 

Before an audience of 250, 
Dunn also related incidents 
which had happened in her 
life. 

Growing up in a large 
family and bemg the middle 
child served as a base for 
Dunn to use as comedy ma- 
terial. 

Dunn has been doing hu- 
morous characterizations 
ever since her childhood years 
at a Catholic school. The 
fashion model character, Pat 
Stevens, was an actual person 
who used to come to her 
sdiool to talk about modeling. 

Dunn also has a more ser- 
ious message for the 
contemporary student. "I feel 
college students should be 
more politicaUy active in their 
thinking." 

In hopes of becoming a 
painter, Dunn attended the 
Art Institute of Chicago for 
two years. Even though she 



has had regrets for nof earn- 
ing a degree, Dunn felt that 
college just wasn't for her. 

Her brother was the person 
responsible for getting her an 
audition for SNL. But, she 
says, "I didn't care if I got the 
job or not. I just came m as a 
character, instead of myself." 

When asked what it was like 
to work with the SNL cast, 
Dunn replied, "It's like being 
in a family, fighting, jealousy, 
and love are all a part of it. ' ' 

Dunn's fellow SNL cast 
member Dana Carvey 
(church lady) was a friend on 
Saturday Night Live. Carvey 
created the Chinese character 
Dunn plays on the show. 

She talked to Dennis Miller, 
also of SNL, about her coming 
to Clarion. MiDer, appeared 
here courtesy of Center Board 
last May. He told her that 
Clarion was a very nice 
campus town. 

The whole cast has been 
asked back for the current 
season, which hasn't been the 
case in the last few years. It's 
also going to be more political 
than m the past, not just name 
dropping. 

Married only two weeks 
ago, the newlj^eds have just 
moved into a new York apart- 
ment. In New York, "At least 
when the people step over a 
body, they say 'excuse me'." 




SNL Nora Dunn from the cast of Saturday Night Live came to CUP, her second college performance. 

Photo by Shannon Ulmer, Staff Photographer 



ittiil 

m 



Lu THE BUDGETING 
GOURMET 



PHI SIGMA SIGMA SORORITY 

WELCOMES 
OUR FALL '87 PLEDGE CLASS: 



• Colleen Wagner 

• Amy Dennis 
\if Jill Sanders 

:* Lynn Paczkowski 

• PamMlgnanelll 

• Alice Fredley 

• KimHarkless 

• Chrissy Eaton 



• Jodi Frazier 

• LynnSchmid 

• Melanie Hoffman 

• Beth Beilstein 

• Shelly Anderson 
if Melissa Ross 

if Angela Covelli 

• Rebecca Cree 



by Angela Covelli 
Features Staff Writer 



ORIENTAL VEGETABLE STIR-FRY 

Home to Oriental Heaven. That's what you can call this steamy 
vegetable vision. You don't even need a wok for this crazy creation. So 
come on guys you can quit trying to decide what to have for dinner. 
This is it kiddies. 

If you didn't get a chance to have some cultural cuisine from Aut- 
umn Leaf Festival you are getting a second chance. At least you'll know 
who had their hands or their chopsticks in your menu. So here's look- 
ing only at you kid. Lucky you that's one less minor informality to con 
cern yourself with. 

So let the festivities commence! Go out to your local grocer and 
purchase: 

Price 
1 green pepper chopped 25 

1 small onion chopped 15 

2 carrots sliced thin 10 

1 bunch broccoli 98 

2 tblsp. oil 13 

2 tblsp. vinegar 17 

Salt and pepper to taste 

Total 1.78 

Several dashes of garlic powder or salt 

Heat on high in skillet (or wok). Add all except vinegar. Stir fre 
quently; cook about 2-4 minutes. Vegetables should remain crunchy. 
Remove from heat, add vinegar. Serve w/rice and/or a salad. Are 
you feeling oriental yet? 






•"-"-■-■-"-"-•-•-•-•-•-•-•-•-••-•-•-•.• • • • • • • ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• • • ••• 



. l € I I- 




I The Sisters of Sigma Sigma Sigma Would Like To I 
I Congratulate and Welcome Our Newest | 




Pledge Class : 



Pam Bleggi 
Wendy Palmer 
Melanie Crocco 
Debbie Crandall 
Missy O'Rourke 
Mary Ann Kristoff 



Tracy Conner 
DeAnn Walker 
Chris Schussler 
Dawn Kolacinski 
Terri Brickley 
Sharon Youngsworth 



fQ>XXK*J*J*J^JK.*J^J^J^J^J*J*J^JfJ^J'J.j*J^J.J*J.J*J*J.J.J. •••-•-• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••• 



18-THE CLARION CALL, Clarion, FA, Thursday, Oct. 8, 1987 



Senior Profile: 



Campus Close-up... Km Acquaro 



by Jenny Palazzo, 
Features Staff Writer 



She's a Student Senator, a 
member of two honorary so- 
cieties, a sister of Alpha 
Sigma Tau, a Little Sister of 
Sigma Chi, and a football 

trainer and more. She's 

Senior Kim Acquaro. Who if 
you haven't figured it out by 
now is a very busy person. I 
found that out when trying to 
schedule an interview with 
Kim, but managed to talk with 
her on a slightly less than cha- 
otic afternoon. 

The oldest daughter of 
Michael and Geri Acquaro, 
Kim graduated from Bras- 
hear High School (Qass of 
'84). She has two younger sis- 
ters, Kellie, a sophomore here 
at Clarion, and Keri, who's a 
sophomore in high school. 
How to describe her family? 
"A close-knit Italian family," 
said Kim. 

Kim is an Elementary Edu- 
cation major, a major I admit 
to have known next to nothing 
about until our conversation. 
When asked about the 
program at Clarion, Kim said, 
"I recommend Elementary 
Education. It's a good pro- 
gram, and there are many 
outside projects to do. You 



don't lust learn from a book." 
As I learned from Kim, this 
major is not easy. 

Kim is currently preparing 
to go through "block," some- 
thing all Junior and Senior El. 
Ed. majors partake in for two 
consecutive semesters prior to 
student teaching, which Kim 
will do next semester. Block is 
a two-week experience in 
which the students travel to 
nearby schools and observe 
classroom activities, assist 
the teachers, and help to plan 
lessons. Last semester Kim 
assisted at Redbank Valley, 
with first graders. Kim enjoys 
children, but admits, "They 
were not my favorites. " 

Upon graduation Kim will 
be certified to teach grades 
kindergarten through six, but 
she hopes to teach third or 
fourth graders in or around 
Pittsburg. 

Math is a subject Kim would 
like to teach the children once 
she settles in at a school. How- 
ever, her subjects in block be- 
fore have been various sci- 
aice and social studies classes, 
and the summer before her 
Junior year, Kim spent two 
weeks teaching an environ- 
mental appreciation class. 

While Kim maintains a 3.4 
grade average, she said her 




involvement in many activi- 
ties has made it "hard to be 
dedicated to everything," but 
still she succeeds at it. 

Kim said that Alpha Sigma 
Tau has been a "big part of 
my life," and since she is one 
of the oldest sisters still in 
school, she has developed 
many close friendships with 
the other members. "They're 
my closest friends, the best," 
she said. 

Kim is also a member of the 
Little Sisters for Sigma Chi. 
After having been friends with 
some of the members for a 
couple of years, when they all 
livai at Forest Manor. 

Phi Eta Sigma, a Freshman 
Honorary Society, is another 
addition to Kim s list of ac- 
complishments. Kim joined 
Kappa Delta Pi during her 
Junior year. It is an Education 
Honorary Fraternity. 

Kim also participates in the 
Work/Study Program here at 
Clarion, as a football trainer. 
She is one of the two girl train- 
ers. Kim said she enjoys the 
work, which consists mostly of 
taping players' ankles, wrists, 
and Imees at practices and at 
all the games. The work is fun, 
but very time consuming, as 
she has to attend practices 
every day, for roughly four 
hours, in addition to making it 
to all her classes and other co- 
curricular activities. Kim, 
after making sure all the foot- 
baU p^layers have been taped, 
remains on the sidelines and 
has to watch for any problems 
or injuries the players may 
face. Kim said she doesn't 
mind the traveling, but "get- 




KIM ACQUARO 

Photo by Peter B. McMlllen, Staff Photographer 

ting up early on a Saturday her. Not many of us choose to 

use the time we have while 
we're in college as nearly as 
effective as ^m has in her 
four years at Clarion. We 
could all learn a lot about loy- 
alty and dedication from her. 



morning isn't much fun." 

So, after meeting and talk- 
ing with Kim Acquaro, I not 
only feel as if I learned a lot 
about her as a person, but how 
very few people there are like 



Musical performance superb 



by Michael J. Downing 
Features Staff Writer 



An Intansa momant — Ray Mogenis (top) baptizes Joel Mayes (bottom) dur- 
ing ttie musical "Godspell." Photo by Chuck LIzza, Staff Photographer 



The odds were against it 
right from the start. First, it 
was competing against the 
numerous parties of the Home- 
coming weekend. Second, it 
was up against the much-re- 
vered Autunm Leaf Festival. 
Third, non-student tickets be- 
came available only three 
days before the opening per- 
formance. 

Despite aU of these seem- 
ingly insurmountable odds. 
Clarion University's presen- 
tation of John Michael Teb- 
leck's "GodspeU" was a tre- 
moidous success. 

When critiquing a play, I 
find it veiy useful to ask the 
question: Is the script suit- 
able to college-age performers 
and how well do those per- 
formers carry out the illusion 
on stage?" Well, "Godspell" 
does weU on both counts. The 
script is both free-wheeling 
and contemporary. This open 
approach ixx>vides college4ge 



actors with the opportunity to 
develop the characters in their 
own way without losing any 
effectiveness in translation. 

"Godspell" works its magic 
on the audience on quite an ex- 
traordinary level. Directors 
John Burja and Sande Kuzio 
clearly had a goal. They had 
their eyes on the promised 
land and carefully guided both 
cast and crew into that land of 
honest fun and powerful spir- 



ituality. The symbolicism in 
"GodspeU" is high and the 
message is clear. This pro- 
vides for a clean and honest 
product. Burja kept all of the 
key elements in the play: hon- 
esty, spirituality, emotion and 
expressiveness while main- 
taining a contemporary at- 
mosphere. This contemporary 
atmosphere makes the 
message of Jesus just as im- 

(See Godspell. . .Page 20) 



Clarion Video Center 



•^v 



HOURS: 

I Mon.-Thurs. 104 

Frf.-Sat.10-9 

Sun. 12-5 



COMING SOON 
NEW MUSIC VIDEOS 

GRATEFUL DEAD 

PINK FLOYD 

4 BEATLES VIDEOS Including 

HELP! and YELLOW SUBMARINE 
4/50 Arriving: WOODSTOCK 

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OVER 2000 TITLES 

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(814)226-5872 



ALF.... 



THE CLARION CALL, Clarion, PA, Thursday, Oct. 8, 1987-11 



(Continued from Page 13) 



however, did not effect the art 
show in the Clarion Free Li- 
brary. Paintings, sculptures, 
crafts, and photograj^ exhib- 
its comprised the Bi-County 
Artists Association 29tn 
Annual Art Show, which ran 
Oct. 1-4. With 165 exhibits this 
year, more than last year's 
number, more people came to 
view the art, said art show 
workers. 

On Saturday morning 
people began preparing for 
the big parade. Of all the 
floats parked near the flag 
poles and the edge of Ballen- 
tine Hall, one stood out par- 
ticularly. It had white risers 
that rose like steps up to the 
pinnacle in the rear of the 
float. Starting at the front of 
the float, one's eyes were 
drawn up the red-carpeted 
steps and beheld a throne at 
the top; a throne for the 
Homecoming Queen. 

At noon on Saturday the fire 
whistle blew as usual, but 
this time evoked a chorus of 
shouts from some cold and 
anxious Homecoming court 
members, as it sign^ded the 
official starting time of the 
parade. The ALF Parade is al- 
ways one of the highlights of 
the week-long celebration. 
People lined the sidewalks 
and tried to get a good vant- 
age point from which to see 
and take pictures. 

As the parade came to an 
end the mass migration to the 
stadium began. Enthusiastic 
fans braved the cold weather 



and umbrellas popped open 
and closed throughout the 
game. 

lYie notes of music faded 
away and the Homecoming 
Court was recognized. The 
Queen walked in procession in 
front of her court, came to a 
stop, and was presented with 
roses. Tlie culmination of the 
ceremony came as Kent 
O'Neil, Student Senate Presi- 
dent, placed the crown upon 
the head of Vicky Amsdell, 
1987 Homecoming Queen. 

The game continued, and 
Clarion continued to win. The 
cold and wind caused some 
fans to leave once the game 
was sewn up, but the hardier 
people remained until the 
clock stopped and the game 
was won. 

Walking back home from 
the stadium in the brisk au- 
tunm weather meant passing 
by the carnival and the con- 
cessions. The luring smells of 
hot apple dumplings, steak 
sandwiches, fudge, and 
Chinese food filled Main 
Street. 

Sunday the fourth marked 
the end of ALF. The main 
event Sunday which seemed 
to draw the biggest crowds 
was the Autorama. Both sides 
of Main Street were lined with 
classic and antique cars, with 
some even in the middle of the 
street. Shiny chrome reflect- 
ing a stray sunbeam, spotless 
windows, a waxed finish, and 
an open hood revealing a 
clean engine were common 



sights. Walking up and down 
IV^tin Street was uke walking 
through time. There were 
enough makes and models 
from so many different years 
that everyone was satisfled. 

After the Autorama was 
over, there was just enough 
time to go to the carnival one 
last time. Little kids aren't the 
only ones who like carnivals; 
coUege kids like them too. 

As it neared 7 p.m. Sunday, 
just about every booth was 
packing up. Music from the 
closing carnival was mixed 
with the sound of banging 
hammers and boards 
hanmiers and boards smack- 
ing together. TTie streets were 
bajcren compared to earlier in 
the day. lYaffic wanted to 
open up again and the drivers 
get back to their normal lives. 
Trash blew along the side- 
walk, mixed in wiOi the color- 
ful fallen autumn leaves. 

Another Autumn Leaf Fes- 
tival has ended with the 
setting sun. For most of us 
there will be ALF '88 to look 
forward to. Seniors have dif- 
ferent concluding impressions 
of ALF, for they might not get 
the opportunity to experience 
ALF again. Terra Miller, Se- 
condary Ed. English major, 
summarizes for her fellow 
seniors, "ALF is a really ex- 
citing time. I will miss build- 
ing floats, sampling food from 
various stands, and being with 
my friends. I'm looking for- 
ward to coming back as an 
alumni." 



(Sorry, Burger King.) 



ACROSS 

1 Leaf of a book 
5 Mine entrance 
9 Haggard 
novel 

12 Wolfhound 

13 Be defeated 

14 Pekoe, e.g. 

15 Band of color 

17 First pterson 

18 Fragment 

19 Microt>e 
21 Stirs 

23 Archbishops 

27 Concerning 

28 Citizen of Rome 

29 Vat 

31 Health resort 

34 Dogtag 

35 Eat 

37 Pecan, e.g. 
39 Above 



40 Obtain 
42 Youngster 
44 River in 

Qermany 
46 Derived from 
48 Travelers 
50 Deadly 

53 Son of Seth 

54 Anglo-Saxon 
money 

55 King of Bashan 
57 Fiber plants 

61 Lubricate 

62 Single item 

64 Mother of 
Apollo 

65 Spanish plural 
article 

66 Melody 

67 Paradise 

DOWN 

1 Dance step 



The 

Weekly 

Crnsswnrd 

Puzzle 



2 In music, high 

3 Long, slender 
fish 

4 Puzzles 

5 Wideawake 



1 


2 


3 


4 


i 


5 


6 


7 


8 


1 


9 


10 


11 


M2"" 








13 








14 






1 








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"TS" 








"19"" 






20^ 


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45- 




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"SJ" 










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61 




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62 




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es 




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*Tr' 









6 Fulfill 

7 Doctrine 

8 Abound 

9 Heating device 

10 At this place 

1 1 Dines 
16 Legume 

20 Encountered 

22 Either 

23 Punctilious 
person 

24 Borne 

25 Negative prefit 

26 Bright star 
30 Donkeys 

32 Football kick 

33 Imitates 
36 Stroke 

38 Prickly plant 

41 Sums 

43 Female deer 

45 Exists 

47 Note of scale 

49 Join 

50 Simpleton 

51 Solo 

52 Booty 

56 African antelop 

58 Conducted 

59 French for 
"summer" 

60 Offspring 
63 Enclosed by 



COUiGE PfSSS SERVICE 



(Solution on Page 20) 



TM 



Quarter P^Hind 
SSiigles 
are just 



(Sorry, McDonalds.) 



mm 






HOURS 

OPEN 10:30 A.M. -11 P.M. 
Monday - Thursday 

10:30 A.M. -MIDNIGHT 
Friday & Saturday 

OFFER GOOD UNTIL 
10/31/87 



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B-m 



'M^^^'^-Tft 



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The best Imrgers 
in the liusiiiess.- 



Cheese and tax extra. 

Offer good at parttelpating Wendy's. 



*Net weight before cooking. 

e 1967 MMidy%. M nghM RMtrvad. 



20-THE CLARION CALL, Clarion, PA, Thursday, Oct. 8, 1987 

GodspelL... 

(Continued from Page 18) 

portant in our lives as it was 
2,000 years ago. 

Joel R. Mayes played Jesus, 
"the eternal savior of the cos- 
mic consciousness," and does 
so armed with the confidence 
that he carries the message of 
Christ. His confidence is high 
and he is convincingly honest 
and open. He contributes to 
the illusion by showing us the 
gentle, yet powerful personal- 
ity of Jesus Christ in the face 
and actions of a contemporary 
young man. 

Raymond P. Mogenis 
played the dual-role of Jesus' 
baptizer and betrayer (an in- 
teresting comment on the 
many and sometimes opposite 
roles we play in everyday life) 
and he does so with great skill. 
His ability to smoothly inter- 
act with Jesus and the rest of 
the cast make his perform- 
ance particularly strong. John 
the Baptist's comment, "It's 
in the script, guys... "is a 
wonderful "aside" which 
brings the audience into the 
play and increases the air of 
intimacy which already is felt 
just by sitting in the Little 
Theater. 

TTie rest of the cast acted as 
a unified whole. Qearly, they 
concentrated upon singing, 
acting and dancing together 
as a unit and their hard work 
was evident. The choreo- 
graphy was good as was actor 
placement. Unlike other 
plays, "Godspell" offers no 
r^ular breate for actors be- 
tween scenes. Therefore, 
these actors had to spend most 
of the two hours in the spot- 
light. Their preparation was 
highly evident. 

The one weak link in the 
performance were the solos. 
Some of the soloists just could 
not carry the powerful spirit- 
uality into the songs. This was 

PUZZLE SOLL^ION 




^ 



In 



the 



groove 



by Kevin Beam and Wayne Brosius 
Features Staff Writers 



ARTIST 

STING 

BELINDA CARLISLE 
BRUCE SPRINGSTEEN 
ALICE COOPER 
GENE LOVES JEZEBEL 
KATHY MATTEA 
THE JAMAICA BOYS 
VARIOUS ARTISTS 
SUPERTRAMP 
DAVID JOHANSEN 
THE HOUSEMARTINS 



TITLE 

...Nothing Like the Sun 
Heaven on Earth 
Tunnel of Love 
Raise Your Fist and Yell 
Promise 
Untasted Honey 
The Jamaica Boys 
A Very Special Christmas 
Free as a Bird 
Buster Poindexter 
The People Who Grinned 
Themselves to Death 



Release 
Date 

10/5 

10/5 

10/5 

10/5 

10/6 

10/6 

10/6 
10/12 
10/13 
10/13 
10/15 



Bundled Up The cold weather didn't stop people of ail ages from having 

a good time. Photo by Peter B. McMlllen. Staff Photographer 






NOTES 

— JACO PASTORIUS, one of the most formidable bass players In recent 
years, died Sept. 21 from injuries received in a beating Sept. 12, in Flor- 
ida. PASTORIUS played bass with such acts as WEATHER REPORT, 
BLOOD, SWEAT & TEARS and JONI MITCHELL. He was nominated for 
three Grammys throughout the 70's and 80's. He was 35. 

—Be on the lookout for Chronicles, a collection of STEVE WINWOOD'S 
classics. The album features a re-recording of his 1982 song "VALERIE" 

-RINGO STARR, ROD STEWART, and former ROLLING STONES bass 
player BILL WYMAN attended the opening of a new restaurant in down- 
town Atlanta last week. RINGO and BILL are part owners of the restaur- 
ant called The Brasserie. So what was ROD doing there? We figure he 
was hungry. 

—An American woman recently tried to sue BOY GEORGE for $20 million 
after her son died of a heroin overdose in BOY's apartment in England. 
But a U.S. district judge said they couldn't do anything because Ameri- 
can courts have no jurisdiction over BOY GEORGE (since he's a citizen 
of Great Britain). The woman's lawyers say they may take the matter to 
the British courts. Smart idea! 

—Encore! Encore! — Almost. After U2 was done performing In New York's 
Madison Square Garden recently in a jam-packed concert appearance, 
the fans wanted more. So much more, infact, that they (the crowd) sang 
to themselves after U2 left. The mega-popular Irish rock group is cur- 
rently touring the states with tremendous response from the fans. 



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the only weak point in an 
otherwise powerful musical. 

Special accolades to the 4- 
piece combo who re-created 
the songs of "Godspell" beau- 
tifuUy. They took great care in 
not allowing their powerful 
equipment to dominate the 
play and override the action. 
They are a wonderful exam- 
ple of the fact that "louder 
isn't always better." 

Lighting was effective, es- 
pecially during the emotional 
scene of Christ's crucifixion. 
Set design was also contem- 
porary as well as useful. They 
often employed one prop for a 
variety of uses. 

Overall, the action kept a 
consistently active pace and 
the overall effect was inspir- 
ing. I hope that John Burja 
continues to select scripts that 
are dynamic and purposefid in 
developing the talents of col- 
lege-age thespians. 



Dirty DdnCinQ. . . .(continued from Page 16) 

I suppose the sexual element reniember that dancing is the because in that era, most 



of the movie will attract view 
ers, and in that respect, the 
mere mention of Swayze's 
name is certain to attract fe- 
male moviegoers. 

MR. TOMCZAK: As I men- 
tioned earlier, the dancing 
scenes did hold my attention, 
but I thought that the plot it- 



major premise of the movie, 
and all the dancing is excel- 
lent. I was really inspired by 
it. It made me want to go right 
out and sign up for Modem 
Dance. But I feel that even 
without the dance, the plot 
could have stood on its own. 
MR. TOMCZAK: To get 



self was pretty much a flimsy right to the point, then, I would 
bunch of cliches to support not recommend going to see 
those few scenes, and maybe "Dirty Dancing. The char- 
sell a few soundtrack albums, acters and incidents don't ring 
I've never been impressed true, I was bored throughout 
with Patrick Swayze as an ac- most of the movie. And one 
tor, and this is not one of his thing bothers me, for a movie 
better performances. In fact, as explicit in its dancing and 
all the actors seemed like they lovemaking scenes as this one 
were just going through the is, how come they never act- 
motions instead of really act- ually mention the word "abor- 
ing. tion?" 
MS. KARPAW: We have to MS. KARPAW: I think it's 



things dealing with sex were 
kept hush-hush. Parents didn't 
feel right saying ** those 
words" in front of the chil- 
dren, and I feel that the writ- 
ers were trying to express 
this. You'll notice that the 
word "pregnant" is never 
mentioned either. Regardless, 
I would reconmiend going to 
see "Dirty Dancing, espec- 
ially to the female audience. It 
had just the right amount of 
seriousness and sexual 
element to make the film en- 
joyable. So, if you like dancing 
and nostalgic style of story- 
line, you should definitely see 
this movie. 





UNITED CAMPUS MINISTRY 

the Christiaii Community togetherll 



Nurture 
Outreach 
Fellowship 




First Baptist Church 
Main & Seventh Avenue 

Grace Lutiieraii Church 
Madison Street 

First United Methodist Church 
666 Wood street 
First Presbyterian Church 
700 Wood Street 

Immaculate C«mce|^ion 
720 Uberty Street 



FCA • Koinonia • Newman 



"UNITED CAMPUS MINISTRY • t 

the Christian Community together! ! 



TNE clarion call, Clarion, pa, Thursday, Oct. 8, 1987-21 











NO MORE 
PLEASE 

by David Mahaffey 

Sports Editor 

"Hie pigeon races ended early 
on Sunday and out of curiosity I 
ventured in to watch some of the 
NFL's replacement games. 

After watching about a quarter 
and a half of the Atlanta vs. Pitts- 
burgh game and then switching 
the channel to catch some of the 
Washington vs. St. Louis game - 1 
was ready to go hunt up the pig- 
eons and see if they were ready 
for a double header. 

The "Football Follies" played 
on Sunday were the biggest mis- 
representation of NFL Football 
that I have ever seen. Even the 
good old 'Aints of the early 80's 
would have been a welcome 
sight. 

If this past Sunday was the best 
football action that we can expect 
from the scab teams then I say 
they don't play the games at all. 

In all tliis madness the only 
people who want the strike, and 
the scab games, to continue are 
Baltimore fans. When was the 
last time the Colts won, let alone 
on the road! 



Usually I wait until my 'on the 
bright side' section to mention 
Penn State, but this week I will 
break from format and speak 
early. 

The Nittany Lions defaced the 
Owls of Temple 27-13 on Saturday 
to raise their record to 4-1. Blair 
Thomas rushed for 167 yards and 
two touchdowns to lead Penn 
State. 

There is a very interesting side- 
bar coming out of Happy Valley 
this season, a comparison of 
sorts. 

To claim its first national 
championship, Penn State de- 
feated Georgia in the 1963 Sugar 
Bowl. The Nittany Lions were 11- 
1 that year, their only loss was a 
humiliating defeat at the hands of 
Alabama, starting to see the sim- 
ilarities. 

Tliat year Penn State was led 
by a tailback that seemed too 
small to play. The trouble was 
nobody ever told Curt Wamo* 
that and now he is (mly one of the 
best runners in the NFL. 

In 1987, Blair Tliomas has been 
leading the Nittany Li<»is. He too 
was told that he may be too small 
to {day tailback. Some schools, 
Temple amcHig them, recruited 
Thomas as a defensive back. 
Well, all Tb<Hnas has dtme this 
year is rush for 6% yards, an av- 
erage of 123.2 yards a game. 

Anotho* similarity. 

Iliis is not a {^edictira that 
Penn State will win this year's 
National title, far from it. I just 
(See Run. .. .Page 28) 



Golden Eagles 

Defeat "The Rock," jump into Top 20 

TEAM STATISTICS 

c^'^r'c/S'w'* ^^ QS Mike Carter. Slip- The big question is "Will sr. cup 

bportsbtaf J writer pg j^j^ battled back to Doug play next weekend Record 2-3 3-1 

Entering the game with an make the game a respectable against lUP? " Sobolewski First Downs 19 21 

1-0 PSAC Western Division 31-25. said, "I have no idea. We'll Rushing 7 8 

record and 2-1 overall rec- Ttie defensive game plan of have to check and see. We'll Passing 8 13 

ord, Clarion University de- the Golden Eagles was to hold play with whoever we have o^?"^"^,: .i .1 

feated Slippery Rock 31-25, to their running backs under 100 there. He started limping a , 5!Irr!:„i^ r.;,h , J; ,2 

move to 3-1 and jump into the yards. Greg Patterson, how- litUe on his other knee and we yds Lost Rush -21 -m 

Associated Press Division II ever, gained 100 net yards on didn't want to take a chance, Net Yds Rush 139 101 

top 20 at number 19. 20 rushing attempts. When so that is why we took him out Net Yds Pass 171 274 

In front of 6,500 people in asked about the offensive at that time. It is gomg to be a Tot. Yds. Off 310 378 

attendance for the homecom- game plan, Coach Gene Sobo- very tough game next week. Passes Att 30 2i 

ing game, the Golden Eagles lewski responded, "We really We have got to improve an Passes Com 13 i? 

marched downfield on their thought we would be able to awful lot. We cannot have a Passes Had. int. . 1 1 

first possession, after a Rock throw the ball with Doug." second half like we did today. Tot. off. Plays 72 89 

fumbled on its own 29-vard TTiey threw weU against SR. If we can have a first half like Avg. Gam Per Play 4.3 5.4 

line. On the first play from Enwninger completed 11 of 18 we did today and put it togeth- p!!"'';rvi pi « .1 ,9 loa 

scrimmage, Sean Morrissey passes for 176 yards and 1 er, we will be a very good foot- inT#&YS 15 11! 

ran the ball and was stopped touchdown. Mike Carter also ball team and we have a pi^t #& Yds 4-1192935-162324 

quickly for a 2-yard loss. On had a pretty good game. He chance," added Sobolewski. Avg. Yds. Per Punt 29.8 32.4 

second down, quarterback finished 6 of 11 for 98 yards score by quarters: Pt. Ret. # & Yds. . 3-17 4-« 

Doug Emminger completed a and 1 interception. His longest sr 6 6 13—25 Kickoff Ret 6-116 5-53 

pass to tight end Jerry Starr pass was good for 35 yards. cup 14 14 3 0—31 3rd Down Conv... 14-2 15-8 

which was good for 20 yards ^^_. _, ^ ^ ^^m '^^^am t ^^wr * ^^^ w ^ 'am" 

and a first down. On first and [flf\\K ^ it,. -IT^ """'^^ ^^. ! ^T'Zmx'^ 

goal, Morrissey ran forward 'lllinl^ ., ^^^^^ ^^r^^ '^ - ^^^^^J P-^^^^W 

for a hard-fou^t three yards. illU|7 ' * * r 1 n ftr ^- ^ ^ -^ ^^ -^ 

Onthenext^y^DougEm- ;JU;|iL - ^ Q? ' a^^^«K S^^t^'J^ 

niinger scrambled left for a iir^-J(^l , ^ ^ . ^ ^1_J%^^@^^^^K|^ H^wa ^ ^ * 

six-yard touchdown. The ^^ «»' j|^';^ ' "^A *^ ^-'^^^^'^WSj^^Kf/ll^^^^^^- ^^ ' 

extra point attempt was good '^ ^ ^^ft, ;„ m "^^mmII^^HK ^^^^^^Bk. a r'' 

by Phil Bujakowski and ^ 

darionled7-0. 

On Slippery Rock's first 

possession, Greg Patterson ^""SS^I^^K^ '*'■'"' *"S ^""^ -fr^ ' ^F ^JP"""^ »^ inr '^^pr m ^^ 

capped off a 73-yard drive by ^JHP|^^K^ ^ ^ t ' w *^^ ^^\n 

running for a 39-yard touch- W^I^KKH% ^4K^^ 

down. The extra-point attempt ^ *w | ^BB|L%^'^ 

faUed and Clarion led 7-6 in the k \ ^^^^^^ 

firstquarter. %»,•• M. "^ ^ *«_ ^^^^m %' 

After trading punts. Clarion ^ T" w^ % Hi^ ^ 

took over at its own 41-yard ^^k w ^gjS 

line. Clarion went 59 yards on VP | ^ 

six plays for another touch- lli^^ '^^ 

down. The drive was high- ^ w" ' jjiy lii'**'^ i... T^ "^t-*- '^^ 

lighted by an 18-yard pass '" .^m^^w ^ .^ 

from Emminger to fullback ^^ 

Mick Kehoe. Morrissey finish- ^^^m^^^j. '~ "" 'S'^^ ^^'- i ' -w^^-.^i 

ed the drive on a delay draw ^^Dip ^ —- — »,.,^ - -i ii it i i Miiwi^niwm ii^ .^^ % 

for 21 yards and a touoidown. ~ ,T.e ««/%!% ^1 . .,< ., o»..dii. b. . « ..« *i . . .^ . ...-r. « 

TTie extra noint was &nod and GOOD — Clarion kicker Phil Bujakowski gets full foot into a field goal against "The Rock." 

the Eagles led 14^ at the end Photo by David Mahaffey, sports Editor 

After SR missed a field S^l^m f OAtnAll hOSInC 

goal, Emminger sparked the ■ IMM IWwlMClll I IwGIVlw 

Eagles completing four a _ ^^ ■ L ^i ■ 

S^meB^caught^ 1 11 1 1 dITI Ul rdl SCnGQUIG 

11-yard pass from E^mminger ■ - 

fw a tMichdown Hie drive by Frank Ashton, Phi Sijgs defeated the Fighting BoneCmshers 000 

was good for 80 yaxtis on 11 sports staff writer Tuna in the West. Buffalo cwps.^ 1 

plays. TTie extra-point was Last week in intramurals, Monday saw four teams in ^ 010 

good and Clarion took control flag football had the stage all action as Bamboo H defeated ^ 

21-6. toitseif, as it began ite 1987 |^f ?^ffj?^|,^»i?*! C&Do<;m::.::::. oil 

At the end (rf the second schedule. S^b P^J^m?^^ ^Sd 000 

quarter, Ken Dworek capped Thare were seva*al games J^l Pounders beat Nuts and sigmaChii*' 000 

m a 66-yard drive by rui»ung during the week and here are ^r^j ^ „ • ^u o ^u r^ Domimck's Revenge ... 010 

three yards fOT yet another the results. On Sunday, the .And finally, in tte South Di- crows 010 

touchdown and Clarion led by Nwth Division had two games ^*<?' pomimck s Revenge west 

28^atthehalf. in which the Wariiealde- J^^beaten by the Flybo^ on Bamboon....^ 100 

llie only Ixight spot in the feated Crush and the Redmen W^esday, as the Boys i^OrangesTeam^.. 100 

second hafc was a John Peter- defeated the Buffak) Oiips. In gckedm) their second win of ^"^ „, \\\ 

man interception and a fee South Wviaon, the Fly- "*®^^ .. ,.. -^ ,. Steve McAnindi'sTim 1 

Bujakowski field goal. Em- boys knocked off the crows. In mouth wit East 

minger hurt his other knee the East, Ron Orange's team waS^ds 100 old Mill Poundere*^.... 100 

and was rqdaced by fresh- drfeated Sigma Chi H and the Ried^ J 00 (Seeintramurai8...Page26) 




22-THE CLARION CALL, Clarion, PA, Thursday, Oct. 8. 1987 

Eagles battle in 
V-ball tri-matches 



by Susan Kurtz, 
Sports Staff Writer 



On Tuesday, Sept. 30, the 
Clarion University women's 
volleyball team met Gannon 
University and the Univer- 
sity of Buffalo in a tri-match 
at Gannon. The Lady Eagles 
were very successful, winning 
both matches. 

Coach Cindy Opalski was 
very pleased with this tri- 
match, especially in defeating 
Gannon, 15-11, 13-15, 15-11. 

"Gannon University was a 
nationally ranked team last 
year. I think this says a lot for 
this year's pro-am. It shows 
where we are right now com- 
pared to last year," said Opal- 
ski. 

Barb Buck led the match 
with an outstanding 13 kills 
through this match. 

"Barb had one of the best 
hitting games, thus far this 
season,' said Opalski. 

Ttie next match was against 
the University of Buffalo and 
ended 15-12, 7-15, 15-12. 

This past weekend Clarion 
was in another tri-match 
against California University 
and Waynesburg University. 

The first match was against 
California with Qarion win- 
ning in three games 15-9, 15-14, 
15-13. 



Tammy Wolfe led this game 
with 10 kills, the best record 
for her thus far this season. 

Denise Layton, out of Pitts- 
burgh, came off the bench to 
play an excellent game. As a 
freshman, Layton is lookmg 
toward a startmg position this 
season. 

The Lady Eagles were not 
as successful against Waynes- 
burg as they were defeated 8- 
15, 14-16, 17-15, 7-15. 

"Waynesburg is a very big 
team. We were blocked more 
in this match than we were all 
season. They just roofed over 
the net and the ball would 
come straight back down at 
us. We had the coverage, but 
they were hard to stop," said 
Opalski. 

Jodi Pezek played the finest 
match this season. In the third 
game alone she had 15 kills. 

"You are able to see the pro- 
gression of this team and that 
we are improving," said Opal- 
ski. 

"We run a very complicated 
offense. We have a multiple 
offense attack out of the 
middle hitters position. This is 
hard to block but also hard to 
run. We are minimizing er- 
rors, through each match, but 
we are still not where we want 
to be," said Opalski. 



John Peterman 



PSAC "Player of the Week" 



Clarion University strong 
safety John Peterman was 
named as the PSAC-Westem 
Division "Player of the Week" 
for his outstanding perform- 
ance in helping Clarion to a 31- 
25 PSAC-West decision over 
Slippery Rock University last 
Saturday. 

Peterman, a 5-10, 190-pound, 
junior, strong safety from 
Pittsburgh (Penn Hills), reg- 
istered 17 tackles (7 solo), 
posted one interception and 1 
oroken-up pass in his award- 
winning effort. His 1987 stats 
show a total of 36 tackles (4th 
on the team), 16 of those are 
solos, plus one broken-up pass 
and one interception. 

"John played consistent 
football and with a high de- 
gree of intensity on Satur- 
day," noted Clarion coach 
G€ne Sobolewski. "I'm very 
happy about John Winning the 
award." 

Peterman, a starter in 1986, 
posted 49 tackles last season 
along with 7 broken-up passes 
and 2 interceptions. He has 
earned a letter in each of his 
first two seasons at Qarion 
and will earn a third letter in 
1987. 

An Elementary Education 
major at Clarion University, 
John is the son of Robert and 
Jean Peterman of 6356 Salts- 




burg Road, Pittsburgh. John 
is also a 1985 graduate of Penn 
Hills High School, where he 
earned three letters in both 
football and wrestling. A run- 
ning back/defensive back for 
the Indians, he posted a school 
record 92-yard run for a td 
versus North Hills. John was 
an all-conference and aU-East 
selection at Penn Hills High 



Clarion Strong Safety. . .John Peterman 

Photo by David Mahaffey, Sports Editor 

School. 
CLARION NOTES: The 

PSAC-East "Player of the 
Week" was Bloomsburg's 
Tom Martin, who ran for 201 
yards on 29 carries in helping 
Bloomsburg to a 16-3 win 
against East Stroudsburg. 

(Story courtesy of Rich Herman, 
psac and CUP Sports Information Di- 
rector). 




SundaLj /^orvdauj Tuesday Wednesdatj Thursday Friday Sa-turday 



IVMCH Bl/FFCT weekdays 
IhZ. Includes Salad Ba«-^ 5oup, 
2 Enti^ees, Potatoe, Vege-^able, Bread 
+ BulUr. All For Onli. * 



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Don 

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At Indiana 



THE CLARION CALL, Clarion, PA, Thursday, Oct. 8, 1987-23 



PSAC showdown on Saturday 



Riding the crest of a 3- 
game winning streak, 
game winning streak, Garion 
University's 1987 football 
team will travel to Indiana 
University of Pa. this Satur- 
day to take on the defending 
Western Division and PSAC 
Champion Indians. Game 
time at lUP's George P. Mil- 
ler Stadium is set for 2 p.m. 

Qarion, led by fifth year 
head coach Gene Sobolewski, 
enters the game with a 3-1 
overall record and a 2-0 mark 
in the PSAC-West. The Golden 
Eagles opened the season at 
home and dropped the opener 
to Fairmont State 14-8, then 
rebounded for two road victor- 
ies at Ferris State (34-13) and 
at California (17-14), plus de- 
feated Slippery Rock fast Sat- 
urday in Qanon's homecom- 
ing game 31-25. 

lUP, led by head coach 
Frank Cignetti who is in Ms 
second season at the helm of 
the Indians, also has a 3-1 
overall slate with a 1-0 mark 
in the PSAC-West. lUP open- 
ed its 1987 season by dropping 
a 31-7 decision at West Ches- 
ter, but rebounded with three 
straight wins. lUP won on the 
road at Towson State (10-7), 
returned home to defeat 
American International 33-10 
and won its conference opener 
last Saturday at Edinboro (28- 
17). lUP was ranked 14th in 
last week's NCAA Division II 
Poll. 

"I think Indiana has a su- 

gerb team," commented 
obolewski on the Indians. 
"They possess a very balanc- 
ed attack offensively, plus 
have excellent skill position 
players. They also started the 
year with a young offensive 
line, but that line has contin- 
ued to mature up front each 
game and is really coming 
along. Defensively lUP has a 
number of quality returning 
players that are very aggres- 
sive and hard nosed. It wiD be 
a war on Saturday and I think 
in order to win we will have to 
play 60-minutes of error-free. 



quality football but I think it 
can be done." 

The Golden Eagles could en- 
ter the game without two out- 
standing offensive players: 
quarterback Doug Emminger 
and center Jerry Fedell. Em- 
minger, who left the Slippery 
Rock game early in the third 
quarter with a leg injuir, is 
questionable for Saturday's 
encounter. "Right now I'd 
have to say Doug is highly 
questionable," noted Sobolew- 
ski. "His condition will be re- 
evaluated later in the week." 
FedeD, a 1986 AP HM All- 
America center, suffered a 
serious injury to his left shoul- 
der and is also highly ques- 
tionable for Saturday. 

TTie Golden Eagle offense is 
currently averaging 22.5 
points p^ game, as well as 
350.8 yards of total offense per 
game. TTie Eagles are ranked 
#1 in total offense in the PSAC- 
West, despite the fact that QB 
Doug Emminger missed Clar- 
ion's opening tilt against Fair- 
mont State where Clarion 
managed only 139 yards of of- 
fense. Since Emminger's 
return the Eagles have man- 
aged 466 yards at Ferris State, 
422 yards at California and 376 
yards against Slippery Rock 
last Saturday. Should 
Emminger be able to 
perform, he will look to im- 
prove on his 1987 stats which 
show him completing 47 of 81 
passes (58%) for 758 yards 
and 5 td's in 3 games. If Em- 
minger is unable to play. Clar- 
ion will go with freshman 
Mike Carter. In 3 games Car- 
ter has completed 7 of 19 
passes for 115 yards. Against 
Slippery Rock last Saturday 
he connect«i on 6 of 11 for 98 
yards. 

On the receiving end of 
Qarion's aerial show will be 
wide receiver Ron Urbansky, 
who has caught 20 passes for 
322 yards and 2 td's, along 
with split end Mike Bresten- 
sky, who has latched onto 11 
aerials for 176 yards and 1 td. 
Tight ends Dan Hastings (11 



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grabs, 252 yards) and Jerry 
Starr (3 catches, 46 yards) will 
also look to make a contribu- 
tion. 

Qarion's running game will 
be led by tailback Sean Mor- 
rissey who has gained 274 
yards and scored 2 td's on 64 
carries. Back-up Ken Dworek 
has scored 2 td's and gained 81 
yards on 28 attempts, while 
fullbacks Mick Kehoe (27 
yards) and Keitti Powell (64 
yards, 1 td) also look for run- 
ning room. CJlarion is averag- 
ing 110.3 yards rushing, along 
with leading the PSAC-West in 
passing yardage at 240.5 per 
game. 

The lUP defense is third in 
the PSAC-West yielding only 
281.3 yards of total offense per 
game. The top rushing de- 
fense in the West, lUP is giv- 
ing up only 83.8 rushing yards 
per game, along with 197.5 
yards per game passing. Up 
front the Indians are led by 
tackle Paul Thompson who 
has 23 tackles. The line- 
backers are certainly a 
strength of lUP's defense, led 
by 1986 All-American Troy 
Jackson (24 tackles, 4 sacks) 
and Dean Cottrill (35 tackles) 
on the outside and team lead- 
ing tackier Kevin McMullen's 
53 tackles, 1 interception and 1 
sack on the inside. Darren 
Cottrill (48 stops, 1 sack) and 
Jim Hostler (3 intercepts) will 
play at the comers with Tom 
Redkoe (1 intercept) at free 
safety. In the last three 
games, lUP's defense is giv- 
ing up only 11.3 points per 
game. 

Tlie Indiana offense is di- 
rected by talented quarter- 
back Jim Pehanick. Pehanick 
has completed 43 of 81 passes 
for 642 yards and 6 td^s. His 
main targets this Saturday 
are likely to be wide receivers 
Tony Trave (15 catches, 270 
yards, 3 td's), Bill Heyser (11 
grabs for 181 yards and 2 td's) 
and Kevin Bache (7 catches, 
60 yards). Tight end Paul Ko- 
veU has caug&t 5 passes for 83 
yards. 



Monday: 

PITCHER 

NITE 



Tuesday: 
MUG NITE 



■ TTie lUP running game fea- 
tures tailback "Pudgy" Aber- 
crombie, who is third in the 
PSAC-West in rushing with a 
74.0 yard per game average. 
Abercrombie has gained 296 
yards on 74 carries. He is join- 
ed in the backfield by Steve 
Girting (30 rushes, 152 yards, 1 
td) and Paul Palamara (3 
td's) who was the PSAC- 
West's "Co-Rookie of the 
Year" in 1986. The lUP 
Year" in 1986. The lUP of- 
fense is averaging 132.8 yards 
rushing and 165.8 yards per 
game passing for an average 
total otfense of 298.6 yards per 
game. 

Qarion's defense will cer- 
tainly receive a stern test 
from the Indiana offense. The 
Eagle "D" is yielding 97.5 



yards rushing per game (2nd 
in the West), along with 159.8 
yards passing, for a total 
average yielded of 257.3 yards 
per game. 

CLARION NOTES: Eagle 
placekicker and punter Phil 
Bujakowski continues to have 
a good 1987 season. He is 4 for 
4 in field goals and 8 for 8 in 
extra points for 20 total points. 
"Bui'^ also is averaging 39.3 
yards per punt and is second 
in the entire PSAC. . .Clarion 
returns home for the next two 
Saturdays with games against 
Edinboro and East Strouds- 
burg Game time for both 

encounters will be 1 p.m. 

(Story courtesy of CUP Office of 
Sports Information) 




"Rambo Eagle" will invade Indian territory Saturday. 

Photo by Chris Honer, Staff Photographer 



Wednesday : 

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Thursday: 
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Friday. 



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HOURS: Mon.Frl. 12-7 p.m. 
Sat. 10-3 



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340 MAIN ST., CLARION 



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24-THE CLARION CALL, Clarion, PA, Thursday, Oct. 8, 1987 



Smith, Magestro fill positions 



Clarion University officials 
announced this week that 
coaching changes have taken 

Elace in men's and women's 
asketball for the 1987-88 
season. 

On the hardwood, former 
Qarion basketball player and 
graduate Terry Smith has 
been named to replace Ken 
Richter as the Golden Eagles' 
assistant men's basketball 
coach, while Leah Magestro 
has beai named to replace 
Tanmiy Stritenberger as the 
Gold^i Eagles' assistant wo- 
men's basketball coach?Both 
Richter and Stritenberger had 
previously resigned their 
posts at Qarion in order to ac- 
cept new positions elsewhere. 
Smith, a 1987 Qarion Uni- 
versity graduate in Business- 
Marketing, was an outstand- 
ing player for the Golden Ea- 
gles from 1982-86 and was a 
student assistant coach during 
the 1986-87 seasonv In Smith's 
career as a Golden Eagle, he 
scored 964 points (17th on the 
all time scoring list) , plus gar- 
nered 587 career rebounds, 
which has him ninth on the all- 
time list. A native of Aliquip- 
pa, Smith had his best season 
at Clarion his senior year, 
leadmg the Eagles in scoring 




Terry Smith and Leah Magestro fill assistant coaching positions for Clarion 
University Basketball. Photo courtesy of CUP Sports Information 



average (13.4ppp), rebounds 
(6.8rpg) and in field goal per- 
centage (50.8%). He was also 
second that year in assists 
(67) and played #2 guard, 
along with both forward and 
center positions at 6'6". Smith 
was named a Hrst team all- 
conference choice his senior 
year in the PSAC-Westem Di- 
vision.- "I am honored to be in 
this position," analyzed 



Smith. "As a graduate and 
former player in the program 
this position means that much 
more to me, I'm proud to be 
here and am looking to do any- 
thing I can to help coach Tay- 
lor and Clarion University." 
Smith played his high school 
basketball at Aliguippa High 
and earned three fetters there 
under coach "Red" McNie. 
He graduated from Aliquippa 



in 1982 and accepted a schol- 
arship to att^d Clarion in the 
Fall of 1982. Terry is the son of 
Leila Smith of 191 Baker 
Street, Aliquippa. 

Magestro, a native of Ma- 
sury, Ohio and a 1978 graduate 
of Kennedy Christian High 
School, comes to Qarion from 
Edinboro University where 
she has been a graduate as- 
sistant coach for the past two 
seasons with the women's bas- 
ketball {MX)gram.'^\Tl am excit-^ 
ed about me opportunity to 
continue my coaching career 
at the coUegiate level at Clar- 
ion University," noted Mages- 
tro. "I feel very fortunate to 
be worldng for highly success- 
ful pn^am like Clarion's," 
added the new assistant 
coach^Magestro was a 4-time 
letterwinner at Kennedy 
Christian High in Softball and 
basketball, plus earned 3 
letters in track. In her sopho- 
more year, the basketoall 
team was 28-1 and third at the 
PIAA AA State Champion- 
shipoVccepting a scholarship 
to Kent State, she was a 2-year 
starter there from 1978-80. Af- 
ter a year attending Youngs- 
town State and not playing 
basketball, she resumed her 
career at Milligan College 



(Milligan, Tenn.). A two year 
starter there, she helped Mil- 
ligan in her junior year to a 26- 
3 overall record and a fourth 
ranking in Division III. Ma- 
gestro graduated in the Spring 
of '83 with a B.S. D^ree in 
Health and Phys. Ed. Girls 
basketball coach at Sacred 
Heart (Sharon), in 83^, boys 
and girls track coach at Ken- 
nedy Christian H.S. in the 
spring of 1964 and assistant 
women's basketball coach at 
Milligan College from 1964-85, 
Leah tl^n went to Edinboro 
before matriculating to Clar- 
ion University. She is the 
daughter of Andrew Mages- 
tro of 8216 Nichols Street, 
Masury, Ohio. 

CLARION NOTES: Smith 
will be working for head coach 
Dr. Richard Taylor, who will 
be entering his sixth year at 
Qarion. . . .TTie Golden Eagles 
won the PSAC-West under 
Taylor in 1983, 84, and 85. . . 
Magestro will be coaching 
under Doris Black who will be 
entering her fifth season in 87- 
88. Black led the Golden 
Eagles to an 8-2 Western Di- 
vision record in the PSAC last 
year which earned the Eagles 
first place honors. 

(Story courtesy Sports Info, CUP). 



Divisional race highlights PSAC 



The Pennsylvania State 
Athletic Conference (PSAC) 
Divisional races are heating 
up and are already featuring 
showdown games this Satur- 
day, October 10th. A total of 3 
divisional games are set to 
be played in the Eastern and 
Western Divisions, with one 
inter-divisional contest also 
slated. All PSAC teams are 
pointing towards the confer- 
ence championship game 
which is slated to take place 
on November 21st and hosted 
by the Eastern Division 
Champion. The ''State 
Game" will be the 28th con- 



secutive year a PSAC Champ 
has been crowned. 

In the Western Division 
this Saturday, No. 19 CLAR- 
ION (2-0) will travel to INDI- 
ANA (1-0) to take on the na- 
tionally ranked Indians. lUP 
was ranked 14th in last week's 
NCAA Div. II Poll, and are 
the defending Western Divi- 
sion and PSAC Champions. 
Other West tilts have SHIP- 
PENSBURG (1-0) at CALIF- 
ORNIA (1-1) and LOCK 
HAVEN (0-2) traveling to 
SLIPPERY ROCK (1-1). 

In the Eastern Division, 
MILLERSVILLE (2-0) hosts 



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MANSFIELD (1-0) in a bat- 
tle between two undefeated 
East squads. Millersville 
was ranked 9th in Division II 
last week. Other East con- 
tests show CHEYNEY (0-2) 
visiting BLOOMSBURG (1- 
1) and EAST STROUDS- 
BURG (0-2) on the road at 
KUTZTOWN (0-1) for a night 
game. 

The lone inter-divisional 
matchup has WEST CHEST- 
ER (2-0 in the east)? visiting 
EDINBORO (0-2 in the 
west). West Chester was in a 
tie for 3rd in the latest NCAA 
Divsion II ranking last Satur- 
day. 

In all, three PSAC teams 
were ranked in Division II 
last week. With all three 
teams winning, West 
Chester, Millersville and 
Indiana are expected to re- 
main in the nation's top 20. 

The PSAC "Players of the 
Week" were Bloomsburg's 
Tom Martin in the East, 
Clarion's John Peterman in 
the West, while the "Play of 
the Week" was turned in by 
Edinboro placekicker 
Darren Weber. 

Martin, a 5-7, 165-pound, 
senior, running back from 
West Caldwell, New Jersey, 
toted the pigskin 29-times for 
201 yards and 1 td in leading 
Bloomsburg to a 16-3 win 
over East Stroudsburg. 
Martin gained 153 yards on 19 



carries in the second half of 
that game. 

Weber, a 5-10, 170-pound, 
freshman, placekicker from 
Erie, Pa. (McDowell) scored 
Edinboro's first points last 
Saturday, although the Scots 
lost a 28-17 decision to lUP. 
He booted an Edinboro 



record 52-yard field goal to 
earn his honors. In PSAC re- 
cords, that ties for 2nd place 
as the second longest field 
goal in PSAC history. 

(Story courtesy of Rich 
Herman PSAC and C.U.P. 
S.I.D.) 




I 



Clarion Football travels to lUP to take on nationally ranked Indians. 

Bruce Cafurello, Staff Photographer 



From th e Cheap Seats 



by Robert Di Domenico 

Sports Staff Writer 

The last thing I remember 
from my brief flirtation with san- 
ity was reading somewhere that 
Guido Merkins was going to be 
the scab QB for the Philadelphia 
Eagles, or Guido had played ev- 
ery position in his years with the 
Oilers and Saints but the idea of 
him riddling NFL secondari^ 
with his pinpoint passing made 
me irrational. After I had finish- 
ed bludgeoning my skull with a 
sledgehammer, I sat down to ob- 
serve Sunday's pseudo-NFL 
games. 

The most appropriate oc- 
currance happened in Philadel- 
phia. While Merkins and Ck)ach 
Buddy Ryan were embarrassing 
everyone in their rrapective fam- 
ilies inside the stadium and the 
strike-supporting Philly Team- 
sters were exchanging fists with 
fans outside the stadium, a few of 
the sick individuals who actually 
went to the game hung a sign that 
was awesome in its accuracy. 

"This is sad!" 

Truer words were never 
spoken. Tlie pseudo NFL is sad. 
It's really sad. But if the NFL is a 
circus then Gene Upshaw is P.T. 
Barnam. He's responsible for my 
current condition. If I keep get- 
ting cat jugglers, two-headed 
midgets and bearded women in- 
stead of top-caliber NFL action, 
I'll be like Jack Nicholson was in 
"The Shining." 

The striking players in Denver 
and Minnesota can't feel any bet- 
ter. Box teams lost home games 
to teams (Houston and Green 
Bay, respectively) they would 
have surely beaten with the usual 
players. And what about the Buf- 
falo Bills? It's a safe bet that they 



wouldn't have lost 47-6 at home 
against the Ck)lts with their re- 
spective normal teams. Yet th^e 
games count toward the striking 
players' standings. If Mr. Barn- 
am, er, Upshaw doesn't concede 
soon, intercontinental madness 
will erupt. 

The College Football picture, 
however, is an interesting one. 
The big battle in Tallahassee saw 
the Miami Hurricanes emerge as 
another contender for the Na- 
tional Title with their come-from- 
behind 26-25 victory over tough 
Florida St. The 'Canes have 
beaten three ranked teams in 
Florida, Arkansas and the Sem- 
inoles and have a soft schedule up 
until their season finale against 
Notre Dame. 

His Pre-eminence was 8-2 in his 
first week of College Football. 
People who claim that I pick too 
many favorites are sad and they 
can use my Texas Tech over A & 
M prediction as proof. Even 
though Gene Upshaw and his car- 
nival have turned the Pre-emin- 
ent One into the Psychotic One 
here are this week's picks: 

NOTRE DAME over PITT: All 
summer, the Pitt slogan was, 
"You couldn't buy a tougher sea- 
son!" Now that they have two 
losses and the meat part of the 
schedule coming (the Irish, Syra- 
cuse and Penn St.), they wish 
they would have bought Okla- 
homa's schedule. Add to this an 
offense that has scored two TD's 
in 10 quarters and you have trou- 
ble brewing at Pitt. 

PENN ST. over RUTGERS: 
Ihe defending champs are lucky 
that the spotlight isn't on them 
after their loss to Alabama. They 
could get back into the thick of 
things with their soft schedule by 
the end of the season. 



LSU over GEORGIA: I'm 

impressed with LSU soph. QB 
Tom Hodson and I'm concerned 
about the knee injury to Georgia 
star tailback Lars Tate. This 
should still be a tough game. 

OKLAHOMA over TEXAS: 
This once-fierce rivalry has dis- 
integrated into another Sooner 
laugher. Will they ever have a 
tough game? 

MIAMI over MARYLAND: 
The tough part of the 'Canes' 
schedule is over. QB Steve Walsh 
and Co. should build their confi- 
dence against teams like 
Maryland. 

MICHIGAN over MICHIGAN 
ST.: The Spartans have already 
faced a tough schedule (USC, 
Florida St., Notre Dame and 
Iowa) and could be worn out. The 
Wolverines have gotten the kinks 
out of their offense after their 
poor showing opening day 
against Notre Dame. 

INDIANA over OHIO ST.: This 
week's upset. The Buckeye of- 
fense has been lethargic and dull 
at best and those ugly red shoes 
aren't helping. 

ARIZONA ST. over WASHING- 
TON: Though the Huskies are al- 
ways tough at home their once- 
promising season has become a 
disappointment. The Sun Devils 
are thinking about a return to 
Pasedena. 

OREGON over SOUTHERN 
CAL: Those great USC teams 
with the great tailbacks and the 
big linemen are a memory. 

OKLAHOMA ST. over COLO- 
RADO: Though these teams 
aren't the caUber of Oklahoma or 
Nebraska in the Big Eight, 
they're both ranked and they're 
both tough. Cowboy Heisman 
candidate Thurman Thomas 
should be the difference. 



SPORTS CALENDAR 

Oct. 8 -14 

8— Tennis at Edinboro 

9— Volleyball at Southern Connecticut Tournament 

Intramural roster due for bowling 
10— Football at Indiana 
Tennlsvs. Pitt (H) 1p.m. 
M & W X-Country at Grove City/Mercyhurst 
Volleyball at S. Conn. Tournament 
12— Tennis at Duquense 

Volleyball vs. St. Francls/IUP (H) 6 p.m. 




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Clarion's Bests 
In 1987 

Longest Rush: 34 yards, Sean 
Morrissey vs California 

Most Rushing Yards: 133, Sean 
Morrissey vs. California. 

Most Passes Attempted: 34, 
Doug Emminger vs Ferris 
State 

Most Passes Completed: 22 Doug 
Emminger vs Ferris State 

Most Receptions: 9, Ron Ruban- 
sky vs Ferris State. 

Most Receiving Yards: 138, Ron 
Urbansky vs Ferris State 

Longest Reception: 46 yards, Ron 
Urbansky vs California 

Longest Kickoff Return: 31, Sean 

Morrissey vs California 
Longest Punt Return: 12, Jacque 

DeMatteo vs California 
Most Team Rushhig Yds: 160, vs 

California 
Most Team Passing Yds: 366, vs 

Ferris State 
Most Team Total Offense: 466 vs 

Ferris State 
Fewest Rushing Yards Allowed: 

65, vs. Ferris State 
Fewest Passing Yards Allowed: 

92, vs. California 
Fewest Total Offense Allowed: 

189, vs. California 
Most Total Points Scored: 34, vs. 

Ferris State 
Fewest ToUl PoinU Allowed: 13 

vs. Ferris State 



' THE CLARION CALL, Clarion, PA Thursday, Oct. 8, 1987—25 

NCAA DIv. II 

Football Rankings 

SCHOOL RANK 

1. South Dakota , s-o 

2. Northern Michigan 5-0 

3. Texas A & 1 3.1 

4. Portland State 4.1 

5. West Chester 4.1 

6. North Dakota State 3-1 

7. Valdosta State 4-0 

8. Millersville 4.0 

9. Tuskegee Institute 4.0 

10. Eastern New Mexico 5.0 

11. Indiana, Pa 3.1 

12. North Alabama 4.0 

13. Cal Poly SLO 4.0 

14. Mankato State (Tie) 4-1 

14. New Haven 3.1 

16. Ft. Valley State 3-I 

17. Ashland College 3-1 

18. Troy State 3-1-1 

19. CLARION UNIVERSITY, PA 3-1 

20. Angelo State (Tie) 3-I 

20. Butler (Tie) 3.1 

20. Santa Clara (Tie 3-1 



PSAC Standings 

1987 PENNSYLVANIA STATE ATHLETIC 
CONFERENCE FOOTBALL STATS 

WESTERN LEAGUE OVERALL 

DIVISION WLT PF PA WLT PF PA 

Clarion 2-0-0 048 39 3-1-0 090 066 

Indiana 1-0-0 028 017 3-1-0 078 065 

Shippensburg 1-0-0 022 015 2-2-0 059 083 

California I-I-O 038 017 2-3-0 074 054 

Slippery Rock 1-1-0 061 066 2-3-0 108 143 

Edinboro 0-2-0 052 064 2-3-0 095 094 

Lock Haven 0-2-O 015 046 1-4-0 041 095 

EASTERN LEAGUE OVERALL 

DIVISION WL-T PF PA WLT PF PA 

Millersville 2-0-0 034 027 4-0-0 099 067 

Westchester 2-0-0 069 027 4-1-0 151 065 

Mansfield 1-0-0 006 005 3-1-0 078 068 

Bloomsburg mo 030 042 3-2-0 096 084 

Kutztown 0-1-0 013 030 0-4-0 052 102 

Cheyney 0-2-O 005 009 2-3-0 041 032 

E. Stroudsburg 0-2-0 030 047 1-3-0 048 073 

THIS WEEKEND (Oct. 10th) UST WEEKEND'S SCORES 

Clarion at Indiana Clarion 31 , Slippery Rock 25 

Shippensburg at California Indiana 28, Edinboro 17 

Lock Haven at Slippery Rock California 24, Lock Haven 

West Chester at Edinboro West Chester 30, Kutztown 13 

Cheyney at Bloomsburg Bloomsburg 16, E. Stroudsburg 3 

Mansfield at Millersville Mansfield 35, Shippensburg 14 

E. Stroudsburg at Kutztown (n) Millersville 3, Cheyney 



Chandler Menu 

SUNDAY, OCT. 11 
BRUNCH: Banana, Grapefruit Half, Hot Cakes with Syrup, Bacon, Hot Meat Loaf Sandwich with 
Brown Gravy, Com Muffin, Hash Brown Potatoes, Desol Peaches, Scrambled Eggs, Sausage 
Links. 

LUNCH: Lima Bean Soup, Homemade Cream of Potato Soup, Roast Steamship Round of Beef, 
Breaded Veal Cutlet, Peas & Carrots, Scalloped Potatoes, Brussel Sprouts. 

MONDAY, OCT. 12 
BREAKFAST: Chilled Pineapple Tidbits, Cheese Omelette, Cream of Wheat, Banana, Pancakes 
with Hot Syrup, Coffee Crumb Cake, Home Fried Potatoes. 

LUNCH: Homemade Beef Vegetable Soup, Cream of Mushroom Soup, Cheeseburger on Bun, Ba- 
con, Lettuce & Tomato Sandwich, Potato diips. Baked Navy Beans. 

DINNER: Homemade be^ Vegetable Sotq), Cream of Mushroom Soup, Baked Chicken, Spaghetti 
with Meat Balls, Whole Kernel Com, Lyonnaise Potatoes, Leaf Spinach with Egg Slices. 

TUESDAY, OCT. 13 
BREAKFAST: Scrambled Eggs, Bacon, Cream of Rice, Banana Bread, Hash Brown Potatoes, 
French Toast with Hot Syrup, Sausage Patty, Blueberry Muffins. 

LUNCH: Homemade Chicken Soup with Fine Noodles, Cream of Carrot Soup, Tacos, Chicken Pot 
Pie, Cheese Curls, Savory Lettuce. 

DINNER: Homemade Chicken Soup with Fine Noodles, Cream of Carrot Soup, Grilled Ham 
Steak, Baked Meat Loaf with Gravy, Buttered Mixed Vegetables, Whi{fied Potatoes, Broccoli 
PokMUiaise. 

WEDNESDAY, OCT. 14 
BREAKFAST: Banana, Fried Eggs, Sunnyside or Ova-, Hot Oatmeal, Home Fried Potatoes, 
Mixed Citrus Sections, Waffles with Hot Syrup. 

LUNCH: Homonade Lima Bean and Bacon Soup, Beef Rice Soup, Hot Italian Saisage on a Roll, 
Fried Fish Fillrt, Macaroni, Baked Macaroni and Cheese, Buttered Zucchini. 
DINNER: Itonemade Lima Bean and Bacon Soup, Beef Rice Soup, Roast Tom Turkey with 
Dressing, Breaded Porkette, Buttered Peas, Mashed Potatoes with Gravy, Hot Spiced Diced 
BeeU. 

TOURSDAY.OCT.IS 
BREAKFAST: Hard Cooked Eggs, Bacon Slices, Hot Oatmeal, Scrambled Eggs, Caramel Bws, 
Haah Brown IN>tatoM, Hot Cakes with Synv, GriOed Saiaage LJnks, Bageto wWiCrewn Cheese. 




I6--THE CLARION pALL. Clarion, PA Thursday. Oct. 8. 1987 

Intramurals... 

(Continued from Page 21) 

Phi Sigs^ 10 

Donger's Disasters II^' . 
Uncle Andy's 

Millionaires^ 

Nuts and Bolts 10 

Fighting Tuna 10 

^ -games pending 
•-forfeit 

Gaines for the Week 

Beginning Thursday, Oct. 8: 
lliursday. Oct. 8: 
Legion of Doom vs. Flyboys 6: 15 
Donger's Disasters II vs. Fighting 

Tuna, 7: 15 
TKE's vs. Sigma Chi II, 8: 15 
Sunday, Oct. 11 : 

Redmen vs. Crush; Blood vs. Crows, 
Die Mill Pounders vs. Phi Sigs, all 
at 6 p.m. 

Steve McAninch's team vs. Ron Or- 
ange's Team, 7 p.m. 
Legion of Doom vs. Sigma Chi I, 

8 p.m. 
Monday, Oct. 12: 

Bone Crushers vs. Crush, 6: 15 p.m. 
Legion of Doom vs. Crows, 7 : 15 pm 
Nuts and Bolts vs. Phi Sigs, 8: 15 pm 
Tuesday, Oct. 13: 
Fighting Tuna vs. Old Mill Pounders 

6:15 p.m. 
Phi Sigs vs. Uncle Andy's Million- 

naires,7:15pm 
Dominick's Revenge vs. Sigma Chi 

1, 8:15 pm 
Wednesday, Oct. 14: 
Nuts and Bolts vs. Uncle Andy's Mil- 

lionnaires, 6:15 p.m. 
INTRAMURAL NOTES: The office 
hours for the intramural office are 
as follows: Monday, 10-11 a.m.; 
Tuesday, 11-12 noon and 1-2 p.m. 
Wednesday, 10-11 a.m. 
Thursday, 11 a.m. - 12 Noon. 




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THE CLARION CALL, Clarion. PA, Thursday, Oct. 8. ^Wif-^f 



S.M.U. Scandal 



On th« Way. . . .Sean Morrissey, #21, breaks a run against Slippery Rock during homecoming. Morrlssey Is the Golden 
Eagles' leading rusher In 1987 with 299 yards. Photo by David Mahaffey. Sports Editor 



DALLAS, TX (CPS)-Two 
weeks after taking office, the 
new president of Southern 
Methodist University finaUy 
talked about the sports scan- 
dals that have made SMU into 
a synonym for all of what's 
wron§ with intercollegiate 
athletics. 

The scandal, president A. 
Kenneth Pye said, has as 
much to do with education at 
SMU "as what's happening in 
the Persian Gulf." 

Pye, who observers thought 
would announce dramatic 
new athletic reforms, spoke 
during a dark time in college 
sports. 

About the time Pye assum- 
ed office, the National Colleg- 
iate Athletic Association 
(NCAA) suspended athletes 
from Ohio State, Pittsburgh 
and Alabama for allegeoiy 
taking money from sports 
agents. 

During the last several 
years, athletes have been in- 
volved in a seemingly endless 
string of drug problems, 



crimes, classroom cheating, 
transcript fixings and other 
unsavory incidents. 

In response, the American 
Council on Education (ACE) 
organized a group of college 
presidents to work for reform, 
and several states — Ohio, 
Michigan, California and, last 
wedt, Texas — have passed 
laws to punish sports agents 
and campus sports boosters 
who violate NCAA rules. 

More ominously for campus 
sports, in July a Media Gen- 
eral-Associated Press poll 
found that half of all Ameri- 
cans believe intercollegiate 
athletics are "overemphasiz- 
ed" in U.S. education. 

"College graduates were far 
more likely to say that snorts 
are overemi^iasized in collie 
than those with less of an edu- 
cation," said Media General 
researcher Dorothy Cook of 
the poU of 1,304 adults. 

"What the public is de- 
manding," observed Sieldon 
Steinbach of the ACE, "is 

(SeeS.M.U....Page27) 



Lady Eagles continue to win 



by Ron Bollinger, 
Sports Staff Writer 



The Clarion University 
Lady Eagle tennis team con- 
tinued to intimidate and 
conquer opponents, as they 
grounded the Slippery Rock 
Rockettes last Tuesday by a 
score of 9-0. With yet another 
win, the Lady Eagles move 
their overall season record to 
W). 

Posting impressive wins for 
Qarion were: No. 1 Lisa War- 
ren defeating Lisa Howe 6^, 6- 
3. No. 2 Susie Fritz winning 
over Amy Tocco 6-2, 6-3. No. 3 
Amanda Bell defastating 
Fiona Koeners 6^, 6-1. No. 4 
Tammy Meyers wiping out 
Stacey Mosely 6-2, 6-1. No. 5 
Clarolyn Vallecorsa handling 
Gretchen Hartman 6-3, 6-1. 
No. 6 Lori Kohn defeating 
Deborah Bond 6^, 6-2. 

Winning on Doubles teams 
for Qarion were: No. 1 War- 
ren and Fritz vs. Tocco and 
Hartman 6-2, 6^. No. 2 Meyers 
and Kohn vs. Howe and Koe- 
ners 6-4, 6-1. No. 3, Bell and 
McAdams vs. Mosely and 
Bond 2-6, 6-1, 60. 

Coach Baschnagel said, 
"The girls played to their po- 
tential in singles matches," 
adding, "the doubles teams 
have to improve on fundamen- 
tals and court tactics. As a 
whole the team has to work on 
return of the serve. " 

Coach Baschnagel com- 
plained that the weather has 
really hindered the team's ef- 
forts to build upon doubles de- 
velopment. Despite the 
climatic hinderances, the 
team has played strong and 
has demonstrated a success- 
ful attitude. They've posted a 
very impressive 68-0 total 
points. At this point in the sea- 



son conference matches are 
very critical due to their im- 
portance in theam ranking for 
the state championships. 

On Thursday, Oct. 1, the 
Clarion Lady Eaele tennis 
team demonstrated their su- 
perior ability at the game of 
tennis by shutting out Lock 
Haven by a score of 9^. This 
impressive victory boosts 
their untouchable record to 7-0 
for the season. Winning 
matches for Qarion were: No. 
1 Lisa Warren vs. Autumn 
Swisher 6-4, 6-1. No. 2 Susie 
Fritz fs. Lisa Stopper 6-3, 6-2. 
No. 3 Tammy Meyers vs 
Becky Boyce 6-1, 7-5. No. 4 
Amanda Bell vs. Angle Wolfe 
6-1, 6-1. No. 5 Carolyn Valle- 
corsa vs. Peggy Buckmaster 
2-6, 6-1, 6-1. No. 6 Jane Bender 
vs Rebecca Chase 6-3, 6-0. 

In tough doubles play Clar- 
ion unfalteringly held strong 
and posted impressive wins. 
No. 1 Warren and Fritz vs. 
Swisher and Stopper 64, 4-6, 6- 
2. No. 2, Meyers and Kohn vs. 
Boyce and Wolfe 6-3, 6-0. No. 3, 
BeU and McAdams vs. Buck- 
master and Chase 6-3, 6-1. 
Coach Baschnagel was 
pleased with the match play 
noting : "That the team played 
to its potential in both singles 
and doubles play, and espec- 
ially good communications 
and tactics among the doubles 
teams." He cautions however, 
"The team must work on 
serve attack volleys, especial- 
ly voUeys at the service line." 
The coach commended the 
girls on their good control of 
the fundamentals, and a 
strong positive attitude to- 
ward winning and being suc- 
cessful. 

Coach Baschnagel would 
like to extend a tremendous 
amount of thanks to this two 





Co-CaptaIn Jane Bender wins match 6-3, 6-0 at no. 6 singles. 



Photos by Mike Bordo, Photography Editor 



student assistants, Phil 
Popielski, and Deborah 
Kotola, who have given him a 
great deal of help and support 
with the program this season. 
TTie team goal of a winning 
season has been accomplished 
and Coach Baschnagel points 
out, "We have to continue to 
keep our goals in mind with 
everyone working to be suc- 
cessful." 

The team's next match will 
be on the road against lUP fol- 
lowed by another away match 
at Edinboro on Thursday. 
TTien for the first time the 
team will play against Divi- 
sion I Pitt on Saturday here at 
home starting at 11 a.m. This 
match promises to be the fin- 
est in college tennis as Clarion 
is fast becoming a Div. II 
power and Pitt has a solid Div. 
I program. 




S.IVi.U.... 

more stringent rules, and 
most schools are responding 
on their own." 

Steinbach cited Virginia 
Tech, which this summer 
passeid toudi new regulations 
of athletes^and boosters' be- 
havior after being punished 
for violating NCAA recruiting 
rules, as setting a valuable 
new standard for campus 
rules. 

"College sports are definite- 
ly moving toward more regu- 
lations," added Marc Drey- 
fors of the Institute for Trends 
Research in Wilmington, N.C. 

Nothing — not the June, 
1986, cocaine-related death of 
University of Maryland bas- 
ketball star Len Bias, the rev- 
elations that several Georgia 
athletes were given special 
academic treatment or the fir- 
ing of a New Mexico coach for 
altering some athletes' trans- 
cripts — seemed to sour pubUc 
opinion as much as the SMU 
scandal. 

"Public reaction to the SMU 
scandal," Dreyfors said, "was 
very important." 

Last year, the NCAA found 
SMU boosters gave $61,000 in 
illicit payments to 13 footbaU 
players, "loaned" them cars 
and apartments, and then 
tried to cover it all up. 

Texas Gov. Bill Qements, 
moreover, apparently knew 
about and approved the pay- 



(Continued from Page 26) 

ments while he served on 
SMU's Board of Governors. 

The NCAA, in turn, imposed 
a "death penalty" on the 
school, barring it from playing 
football this year and most of 
1988 

"Yes," said SMU athletic 
department spokesman Paul 
Ridings, "wel-e hopeful that 
past mistakes won't be repeat- 
ed. There will be no special 
admissions for any athlete 
who does not meet" SMU's re- 
quirements, "and there will be 
no more payments. " 

Still, observers were wait- 
ing anxiously to hear what 
Pye — a Duke professor who 
took the SMU job after the 
scandal forced out former 
SMU president, L. Donald 
Shields, as well as SMU's foot- 
ball coach and athletic direc- 
tor in the last year — would do 
about sports. 

His answer in his Aug. 29 
speech to SMU's freshmen: 
essentially ignore the past of- 
fenses. 

Pye made a "plea for assis- 
tance" to SMU freshmen to 
help recruit promising ath- 
letes for SMU from their old 
high schools, a switch from 
the high-pressure recruiting of 
high school seniors by boost- 
ers. 

Pye also promised he will 
soon unveil a 10-point pro- 
gram for improving 
academics at the school. 



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Lady Eagles Tennis. . .posted two wins last week by shutting out both Lock Haven and Slippery Rock 



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28-THE CLARION CALL, Clarion, PA, Thursday, Oct. 8, 1987 



Sports Spotlight . .onPhUPopielski 



by Michael A. Sexauer 
Assistant Sports Editor 



What happens to a District 9 
high school tennis champ that 
doesn't get recruited? Simple, 
he becomes a student coach. 

Although that may not be 
true all the time, it's true for 
the Clarion University Wo- 
men's Tennis team and 
student coach/trainer — Phil 
Popielski. 

When Popielski came to 
CUP in the fall of 1984, the pos- 
ition of student coach didn't 
exist. Phil came to practice 
more to observe than to offer 
advice. 

Coach Baschnagel must 
have recognized Phil's ability 
and asked him to "make a 
commitment," Popielski says. 
An agreement was reached, 
and the position of student 
coach was created. 

As many coaches will 
agree, being a coach has its 
trying moments. And, as most 
students will agree, being a 
student can be equally as hec- 
tic. Now imagine assuming 
both roles as an everyday job. 
Popielski has his hands full. 

Now in his senior year, Phil 
has even more responsibility 
as student assistant coach. As 
a student, Popielski sees the 
team as his p€NBrs. As a coach, 
he must try to maintain a 



more professional standing 
with the team members. 

Some of Popielski's respon- 
sibilities include: being at 
practice early to work on in- 
dividual problems with the 
players, preparing the courts 
tor matches, pre-match pep 
talks, fund raising for team 
equipment, and team spokes- 
person. 

While in high school back 
home in Johnsonburg, Phil 
held the title of District 9 
Singles Champ for two years. 
Popielski shared the captain's 
position with his doubles part- 
ner for his junior and senior 
years. He also played four 
years of basketball for John- 
sonburg High School. 

Popielski is working on a de- 
gree in elementary education 
with a coaching certificate. 

Phil's present coaching ex- 



as coach for the Immaculate 
Conception Elementary 
School boy's basketball team. 

When he's not coaching, 
Phil referees area PIAA bas- 
ketball games. 

Popielski has two long-term 
goals for his career; the first 
is to earn a second degree and 
become an administrator. The 
second goal is to take over the 
coaching job of his dreams - 
"Digger Phelps' job as the 
basketball coach at Notre 
Dame." 

Until Phil assumes one of 
these roles, he wants to re- 
main close to CUP and get an 
elementary teaching/coach- 
ing job in the area. Popielski 
feels the most rewarding ex- 
perience he's had while assist- 
ing at CUP and coachuig at 
I.e., has been the people he's 
met and worked with. That's 
what has convinced him to try 
to stay in the area. 



Dream job — "Digger Phelps' job as the basket- 
ball coach at Notre Dame. " 

—P. Popielski 



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perience is not only coming 
from the C.U.P. tennis team. 
Because of his experience 
with Clarion's sunmier clinics 
for basketball and good refer- 
ences from Coach Baschnagel 
and CUP men's basketball 
coach Dick Taylor, Popielski 
will be starting his third year 



Since Phil has been with the 
CUP women's tennis team, he 
has seen a noticeable turn- 
around. He credits this to both 
Coach Baschnagel and his 
players. Lynne Fye and Sue 
Fritz, Phil feels, are especial- 
ly responsible for the team's 
success. 




r 



PHIL POPIELSKI 
Tennis team student coach 

Photo by Mike Bordo, Photography Editor 



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Now that the Major League 
baseball regular season is over it 
is time for Tank's first annual 
Diamond Awards: 

•National League MVP: Andre 
Dawson, 49 HRS and 137 RBIs. 
Playing on grass in Chicago, the 
Hawk is playing like he is 25 
again. 

•American League MVP: 
George Bell, Toronto, 47 HRs and 
134 RBI's. A player that has even 
better things to come. 

•NL Manager of the Year: Lar- 
ry Bowa, San Di^o. At the be- 
ginning of June if someone had 
told me the Padres wouldn't lose 
100 games I would have laughed 
in their face. 

•Baseball's Man of the Year: 
Syd Thrift, Pittsburgh GM. Ev- 
ery Pirate fan should write this 
man an apologetic letter for the 
statements made about him and 
his early season trade of Tony 
Pena. 

•Other winners of Diamond 
Awards: Cy Young - N.L. Rick 
Sutcliffe, Chicago, A.L. Dave 
Stewart, Oakland, Rookie of the 
year - N.L. Mike Dunne, Pitts- 
burgh. A.L. - Mark McGwire, 
Oakland. 



Prof in serious condition after car wrecic 



by Liz Koones 
News Editor 



Alfred B. Charley, asso- 
ciate professor of art at Clar- 
ion University, was seriously 
injured October 7 in a three- 
car accident on Route 8, south 
of Butler in Penn Township. 

A Presbyterian Hospital 
spokesperson said Charley re- 
mains in serious condition in 
the hospital's surgical inten- 
sive care unit. 

According to the Pittsburgh 
Post Gazette, Charley suffer- 
ed brain damage and is in a 



coma. 

The accident occurred at 
9:15 a.m. while Charley was 
travelling to Pittsburgh to 
pick up art supplies. A 1983 In- 
ternational truck driven by 
Robert D. Park of RD 6 Butler 
turned left in front of Char- 
ley's 1985 Chevy Celebrity on 
Airport Road. Park then slid 
into a 1980 International truck 
in the east bound lane, driven 
by Larry Schlagel of Main St., 
Butler. Park was issued a ci- 
tation by Penn Township 
police for vehicle turning left. 

Charley was taken to Butler 




ALFRED B. CHARLEY 

Clarion Call File Photo 



Vol, 59 No. 6 



Hospital by Penn Township 
Ambulance and later life- 
flighted to Presbyterian Hos- 
pital in Pittsburgh. 

Charley, 57, of Foxburg, 
Qarion County, has taught at 
Clarion University since 1963. 
He received his Master's of 
Fine Arts degree at Southern 
Illinois University. 

Charley is internationally 
known for his bronze sculp- 
tures and medallions. He is 
Pittsburgh's Artist of the Year 
and is slated to have a major 
art exhibition at the Pitts- 
burgh Center for the Arts. 



Thursday. Oct. 15, 1987 



TKe 



LARION 



CALL 



% C[a%ion %LniuE%6.ity of U^enn^ijluanla 



Investigation underway 

Move for bookstore under consideration 



hy LuAnn Zeigler, 
News Staff Writer 



Even though the Clarion 
Universi^ Book Center is a 
non-profit organization, a 
small profit is being generated 
for a special fund to build a 
new store. 

The Book Center, which pro- 
vides students with all text- 
books and supplies, reaps a 
profit in the buying and selling 



of text books, and in the sale of 
all other items. 

Mr. Lee Krull, Business Man- 
ager of the Clarion Student As- 
sociation, explained that "a 
small profit is made and out of 
that small profit, 25 percent of 
the money is put into the 
Bookstore Capital Improve- 
ment Fund to be used toward 
building a new store." There 
is an investigation being con- 
ducted to locate a possible lo- 



cation for a new bookstore. 
The only problem to be consid- 
ered with relocation would be 
the wei^t of the books on the 
structure of the store. 

Tliere is a text department 
that regulates the textbook 
purchasing and selling. Within 
this department the prices be- 
tween buying and selling of 
textbooks allows the bookstore 
to reach a break-even point. 
All other items besides text- 




The cold winds blow Even though fall is still upon us, Clarion has had a taste of winter this past week as frost and 

cold winds invaded the area. Photo by Mike Bordo, Photography Editor 



books support the text depart- 
ment. Trie textbooks have a 
markup of 20 percent. As far 
as the Duy-bacK system goes, 
our bookstore does not con- 
duct the sale. Another whole- 
saler, the Follett Book Com- 
pany in Chicago, determines 
the amount of money that stu- 
dents will receive for their 
books. The price of the books 
is in turn determined by the 
supply and demand for the 
books. Ed Biertempfel, man- 
ager of the bookstore, said 
"the buy-back system has two 
phases. The first is the big 
Duy-back where students sell 
their books back to the whole- 
saler via the bookstore for 
one-half the current regular 

Erice. If the textbooks aren't 
eing used again or all orders 
for the books are filled, the 
wholesaler will buy the text- 
books for their company." As 
a result, the student receives 
less money. 

The second phase of the 
buy-back system is the book- 
store offering to buy books 
every Thursday from students 
who either found out they 
didn't need the book or just de- 
cided to sell the book now 
rather than wait till the end of 
the semester. This sale is con- 
ducted strictly for the whole- 
saler. One of the advantages 
of selling books back at the 
Old of the semester is more 
money to the student for wait- 
ing to sell them during finals 
week. 



The bookstore pays for all 
shipping costs of textbooks, as 
wefi as the pricing and selling 
costs. It also pays any ship- 
ping back to the publisher. 

Sometimes editions are 
changed from one semester to 
the next and, according to 
Krull, "the professors and 
authors are constantly chang- 
ing editions. Some of the auth- 
ors may be taking advantage 
of the situation." Requests for 
textbooks are sent to the pro- 
fessors asking them which 
books they want to use and 
these requests are sometimes 
sent back late or not returned 
ataU. 

Many items are discounted 
in the bookstore as a courtesy 
to students. A 20 percent dis- 
count is offered on general 
reading paperbacks, stuffed 
animals, greeting cards and 
posters. "Die bookstore isn't 
able to get the price breaks 
that larger department stores 
do because they don't buy as 
large of an inventory. 

The bookstore costs are 
audited twice every year, 
once by a private C.P.A. firm 
and a second time by the uni- 
versity administration. Laws 
from the Student Senate are 
abided by the bookstore. 

lines to buy textbooks are 
something that can't be rem- 
edied no matter what system 
is used. Every semester there 
will be lines, especially one or 
two days during the first week 

(See store Page 4) 



Pet rco Weekend Weather 
Clear & Sunny 

High's in th« low 60's 
Low's in the low 40'8 



Htgh Turnout for 
Bloodmobile 

News — Page 5 



"The Pick-up Artist".. . 

A Review 

Features — Page 11 




NCAA Football Rankings 
Sports — Page 20 



2-THE CLARION CALL, Clarion, PA, Thursday, Oct. 15, 1987 



OPINION 




Clarion County Justice 

by Deborah M. Schofleld 
Editor-in-Chief 

The morning's hallow light reflected solemnly off the dark wood- 
work as I passed through the courtroom doors. At five minutes to 
nine, the long hardwood seats were nearly full, and high above the 
lights were dim. Parents quieting children, three-piece-suited lawyers, 
and ruffled looking individuals fidgeted in their seats. Coughs and 
whispers echoed, breaking the near silence. 

My companion and I sat patiently among a handful of Clarion 
students and faculty, waiting for Monday's proceedings to begin. But 
nine o'clock saw an empty judge's seat and even more coughing. 
Sitting in one of America's courtrooms for the first time, I was awed 
by the eminence of the 22 foot ceiling, the tall windows, and the 
collection of judges' portraits covering the back wall. Many times Fve 
called for the results of sentencings, trials, and indictments, but never 
before had I sat through any of these proceedings. 

Soon it was 9:10 and still no judge filled his honor's seat. Some 
lawyers stepped into the hallway to have a cigarette and throw 
around legal jargon about Butler County lawyers. Others leaned over 
each other's shoulders whispering and smiling. I wondered what each 
was saying. Still a hallow quietness hung over the large room. 

Nearly 45 minutes passed before Judge Greiner entered and we 
all rose. . . rose in a respect for justice. 

But justice that Monday, October 5 seemed rather disorganized 
for a court filled with 35 people to be sentenced. As Judge Greiner sat 
and began to address the court, it appeared his microphone was not 
working. I guess this minor detail had been overlooked in our 45-min- 
ute delay. A simple flip of a switch solved this problem easily. Now 
ready, Judge Greiner began to address the court, no louder than a few 

minutes before though. 

(See Life Page 4) 



(^The Clarion Call 

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The Clarion Call is published every Thursday during the school year in accordance with the school 
calendar. Editors accept contributions to their sections from any source, but reserve the right to edit 
all copy for libel, taste, style and length. 

The absolute deadline for editorial copy is 12:00 noon on Monday. 

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CYRUS F. PATEL 

The purposes of general education 
have l^n described by the Clarion 
undergraduate catalog as "an essen- 
tial complement," "to assist the stu- 
dent's general development" "with 
an opportunity to develop an under- 
standing and appreciation of the in- 



molding the perfect undergraduate, 
but teachers are human and, as 
5uch, have their own interpretation 
)f what is ideal. In short, do the 
heories and glorious images of 
general education requirements 
reflect what is implemented? 

My essay is not to impress upon 
y^ou my ideas or beliefs, but it hopes 
to evoke a question within you. Do 
^ou, as a teacher, do as was orig- 
inally intended? Do you, as a stu- 
dent, believe that you are benefiting 
from general education courses as 
you were intended to? Did you truly 
desire intellectual benefits when you 
took that basic course for easy credit 
and an easy A? Y^, I mean the 
same subject you took in high school 
for three years. 

I have decided to dissect the gen- 
eral education curriculum with an 
analysis of the first item on your 
checksheets. If the value and 
validity of the class you teach/take 
isn't questioned here, do it yourself. 

Modes of Communication has been 
defined as "the development of 
knowledge and ability to (do you see 



selves and are perfect for the pur- 
pose. 

Mathematics develops a logical 
thought process, but does it allow for 
a communication capability? The 
two are totally alien. Can a student 
make a point using deductive and 
logical reasoning better after a math 
course than he or she did before? 




'**In short, do the theories and glorious 
images of general education require- 
ments reflect what is implemented?" 



tellectual, cultural and moral 
forces" "and to provide the basic 
knowledge and skills that will allow 
for a fuller life." 

The idea and philosophy behind 
such educational structure is no 
iloubt noble, and is perfect for 

Norm's Dorm 



a mention of efficiency?) communi- 
cate personal ideas and philosophy." 
Courses can be taken in English, 
Speech and Theatre, Mathematics, 
Computer Information Science and 
Elementary Foreign Language. 
English and SCT speak for them- 



I YiM. Mean you ^eallY 
IN OVER TP}Ree.">fe/4f?> 



I P/PN'T you Goto 
I -rae ThWYs SEHf- 
fo^^^AL LAST 



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Besides computer languages 
(cobol, Fortran, Pascal, etc) what 
other Computer Information Science 
course develops communication 
ability? Even if a student does take 
computer language courses, how 
does he or she apply it effeciently in 
a job environment? For students 
outside the CS/CAIS m&yx, how do 
these courses permit communica- 
tion of personal ideas and philosoph- 
ies? 

Having covered just one of the five 
facets of General Education, I want 
you to sit back a moment and think! 
For the student: Are the Gen. Ed. 
courses that you take giving you 
your money's worth? For the teach- 
er: Are the courses you teach val- 
uable or have they become the thing 
to take only to make graduation 
requirements? 

—Mr. Patel is a Sophomore Com- 
munication Major). 



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ARc.^»E -' Po<^ CoVS 




The Call Mailbox 



THE CLARiON CALL. Clarion, PA, Thursday, Oct. 15, 1987-3 



ffr Sm 



Editing Complaint 

Dear "Editors": 

I would LOVE to congratulate you 
on your superior ability to edit. I'd 
love to, but I can't. I realize that not 
every publication can or will be er- 
ror free, but the Clarion Call issue of 
October was a disgrace to the Call 
editors. Not only were there numer- 
ous typographical errors in both ar- 
ticles and advertisements, but sev- 
eral content errors were found also. 

As a previous editor of another 
publication, I understood that the 
credibility and quality of the pub- 
lication depended on what I did or 
did not do at my desk. Perhaps the 
Call editors should take that into 
consideration as they prepare for 
their future as an editor. Not only do 
these errors undermine the intel- 
ligence of the Call staff and make 
the reader irritable and impatient, 
but it makes the University look 
ridiculous on the whole. One of the 
goals of our University is to foster in- 
tellectual growth and to achieve a 
high level of knowledge through the 
classroom as well as through extra- 
curricular activities. Because the 
Clarion Call is one of those activi- 
ties, wouldn't it be nice if you could 



provide the faculty and students 
with a paper they are not ashamed 
of? And let's consider the advertiser 
whose mere request is that you get 
the ad correct for the fee that they 

pay- 
Let's face it, if you spent even half 
the time editing as it takes for the 
advertisers and the writers to pre- 
pare their work, the paper would be 
much better off. 

In closing, if you cho(»e to let the 
work that comes off your desk be 
less than perfect, not what the cus- 
tomer asked for and of such poor 
quality, then please do it at someone 
else's expense; meanwhile, I'll be 
waiting to see the quality work that 
used to exist in the Clarion Call. 
Sincerely, 
Jani Ryan 

Godspell Grief 

Dear Editor: 

I oijoy the feeling of self-satisfac- 
tion that I get after I do a job that I 
feel has been done well. However, 
like most people, I also feel a need 
for outside reinforcement or con- 
structive criticism. I feel I have 
been cheated of this. 

Last week's edition of the Call con- 







flNt^fc 




tained a review for "Godspell" by 
Michael Downing. I was very pleas- 
ed he gave the show a great review 
overall. I liked the fact that he com- 
mented on the technical end of the 
production; the direction, the 
choreograi^iy, musicians, lighting, 
and sets. What about the costumes? 
I put many hours, some frustrating, 
into the design and construction of 
the costume plots. "Godspell" has 
been, to date, my largest designing 
assignment, and I wanted to see 
what the reviewer had to say so that 
I could have a basis for future shows. 
There was no mention of costumes 
in the review. 

Maybe some of the fault for this 
lies in the wording of the program. I 
am technically the supervisor for 
the Theatre Department's costume 
shop, heace my label is "costume 
shop supervisor" in the program in- 
stead of "costume designer." But 
even if this was the case, the fact 
remains there was no mention of the 
costumes at all in Mr. Downing's re- 
view. 

I would like to hear his response to 
this letter. 

Thank you, 
Mary K. Retort 

CAB'S Compliment 

Dear Editor, 

CAB'S on Saturday was the best it 
has ever been this year and the best 
it ever will be unless we continue to 
have music like we had on Saturday. 

In the past CAB's the music could 
have been MUCH better — at least in 
this decade. I couldn't figure out 
why none of the popular artists' 
music were ever played. Madonna, 
Prince, Janet, George Michael, Ban- 
anarama, L. L. Cool J., and so on. It 
was the same songs every weekend. 
And these songs are very difficult to 
dance to. 

I didn't sit down or stop dancing 
once this past CAB's except for one 
slow dance and that's because I 
didn't have a partner. With the 
music that was played, I could have 
kept dancing until the sun came up. 
Those students who were there know 
what I am talking about. 

So, please other D.J.'s, take heed 
to what was played this past CAB's. 
This is Music! This is Dance Music! 
This is what we want to hear ! 

I stnmgly believe the music that 
has been played in the past CAB's 
isn't strong enough to pull people in 
when the weather gets bad. But the 
music at this past CAB's will. 

So, at my last plead — keep up the 
good music. 

Rhonda M. West 
622 Wilkinson Hall 

Student Response 

Dear Editor: 

I am writing in response to the in- 
accurate account of the incident 
that occurred during the Black Stu- 
dent Union Homecoming Cabaret. 

The "concerned student" who 




Comments are accepted and 

encouraged as Letters to the 

Editor. All letters must he 

signed but names will he held 

upon request. Drop all 

letters at the Clarion Call 

Office, 1 Harvey Hall. 



wrote to you last week reported that 
she and her friends were told by 
"committee members" that they 
were not "dressed up" enough to 
enter the Cabaret. The student also 
deduced that since she felt that she, 
her roommate, and their boyfriends 
were dressed in the proper manner, 
the only reason they were turned 
away was because of "discrimina- 
tion." 

This letter is written to report 
what actually occurred. 

1. Semiformal dress means that 
women wear evening dresses and 
dress shoes and that men are to 
wear suits, ties, dress shirts and 
dress shoes. Due to the fact that not 
all college students own a suit or an 
appropriate dress, we modified the 
definition of semiformal so that 
dresses, dress pants, dress shirts 
and/or sweaters, and dress shoes 
were acceptable. 

2. Countless students expected to 
attend the dance wearing 
jeans/dress jeans, sneakers and 
other casual clothing. These are in- 
appropriate attire for semiformal 
activities. These students were told 
that if they were willing to change 
into appropriate attire and pay the 
admission charge, they would be 
welcome. ALL students who were 
dressed properly were admitted. 

3. The four "committee mem- 
bers" to which this student referred 
were in fact three Black administra- 
tors, two Black faculty members, 
and one Black graduate student, all 
serving as chaperons. They iden- 
tified themselves as such. At no time 
did they say that they were com- 



mittee members. Their role was to 
assure that the University policies 
were followed for activities con- 
ducted after 12:00 A.M. But they had 
to be even more assertive due to the 
inappropriate attire and behavior of 
some of the White students. 

4. For over 14 years, the Black Stu- 
dent Union has held a cabaret during 
Homecoming. The dress code has 
consistently been semiformal; and 
students. Black and White, have 
abided by the code. 

5. At this past cabaret, the chap- 
erons were called "f— ing niggers" 
by a group of White males who hurl- 
ed beer at the doors of Harvey Hall 
when they were told about the dress 
code. Many other statements of the 
same magnitude were made by in- 
toxicated White students who passed 
by the cabaret. The chaperons were 
forced to call Public Safety three 
times due to their concern over the 
behavior of students who were not 
permitted to enter. 

6. The "concerned student" states 
that when questioning a "committee 
member" about his attire, he re- 
sponded "that he was on the com- 
mittee and that was okay." "Riis is a 
{,ross misrepresentation of the act- 
ual occurrence. The reality is that 
the faculty member to which she is 
referring responded as follows: "I 
am wearing dress pants, a dress 
shirt, a sweater, and dress shoes. I 
am, therefore, dressed in an accept- 
able manner." 

7. Another comment made by the 
writer was, "If you ask me, this was 
a case of discrimination. . .And I 
think that being White was the only 

(See Mail. ..Page 4) 




Clarion In the morning. . .Fog blankets an early morning Clarion as the sun 
fights to break Into bloom. Photo by Mike Bordo, 

Photography Editor 



4-THE CLARION CALL. Clarion, PA, Thursday, Oct. 15, 1987 



Fashion moves leftward 



by Mike O'Keeffe 



(CPS) — Campus fashions 
are changing radically this 
fall, but no one is sure if it 
means students are becom- 
ing as radical as their 
clothes. 

"I don't know if it's a politi- 
cal statement," said Valerie 
Cartier of Minneapolis' Haute 
Stuff boutique, a shop popular 
among University of Minne- 
sota students. "But it is a 
statement." 

"It's the return of the '60's," 
asserted Lany Schatzman of 
the Unique Clothing Ware- 
house, a Greenwich Village 
store frequented by New York 
University students. 

Whatever it is, America's 
college students are mellow- 
ing out their wardrobes this 
fall: tie-dyes, jeans and mini 
skirts are in, and the pressed, 
preppy look is out, various 
fashion observers agree. 

"Even sorority girls aren't 
wearing very preppy clothes 
this fall," Cartier reported. 

"Students are dressing the 
way they're living," Cartier 
said. "Tliey're not sitting at 
home and planning their out- 
fits for an hour." 

"When I was a freshman I 
really didn't fit in," recalled 
Tim Lum, a Boston College 
senior. "The campus was 
really into the preppy stuff, 
and I really felt out of place. I 
feel a lot more comfortable 
now. I could never wear those 
preppy things." 

At NYU, students are 
"going crazy over acid- 
washed (pre-faded) jeans. 
And tie<lye has come back in 
a very big way. Leather jack- 
ets and pants are also popular, 
especially if they have a dis- 
tressed look." 

Another old style is return- 
ing. "Mini skirts are very big 
right now," explained Nancy 
Cooley of the Ritz, just off the 
University of Colorado cam- 

. "Short skirts are hot." 



Also big among college stu- 
dents are silk skirts and 
shirts, '40's pleated pants and 
slinky dresses. 

"Women," Cartier added, 
"are wearing big hoop ear- 
rings, thick belts and chunky 
jewelry. Anyone who hung 
onto that stun now has a real 
treasure." 

Owners of stores on or near 
campuses say things like 
Army surplus pants, 
Guatemalan wrist bands, 
oversized sweaters and 
jackets are selling cjuickly, 
while rich, traditional colors 
like plum and forest green are 
in. 

Out are torn-neck T-shirts, 
turquoise and silver jewehy, 
stirrup pants, designer jeans, 
polyesters and big tune boxes. 

Schatzman counsels that, 
althou^ '80s stud^ts are in- 
terested in '60s fashion, they 
may not be interested in "ser- 
ious" issues. 

His store stocks dozens of 
goofy toys rangjing from water 
pistols to plastic dinosaurs to 
paddle balls. "We sell an 
awful lot of yo-yos," Schatz- 



man said. "It's fun. It's an 
'80's mentality." 

The mentality also appar- 
ently includes an eye for a 
bargain, or, as University of 
Colorado student govememtn 
leader Perry Dino calls it, 
"value shoppin'." 

Dino forsakes trendy "vint- 
age clothing" shops for Salva- 
tion Armv outlets, Goodwill 
stores and Disabled American 
Veterans shops. "I'm talkin' 
values here," Dino cracked. 

Dino wears his second-hand 
threads everywhere. "When I 
showed up at the last regents' 
meeting, Dino said, "the kid 
was loohin' gooood." 

Dino believes the change in 
fashion reflects a change in 
student attitudes. Like their 
'60's counterparts, late '80s 
students are interested in poh- 
tical and social activism. 

"I think a lot of people are 
ready to sign the Port Huron 
statement again," Dino said, 
referring to me manifesto that 
began Students for a Demo- 
cratic Society, one of the most 
important sixties leftist 
groups. 



IVIalla ■ ■ ■(Continued from Page 3) 
reason that we were." These were aret. 
the closing words of the "concerned 
student." In her survey of the "other 
White students who were turned 
away," this student neglected to as- 
certain that there were quite a few 
White students who were in atten- 
dance at the cabaret, who were 
dressed appropriately and had a 
nice time. There were also White 
students who went back to their 
rooms, changed their clothes, and 
returned to be admitted into the cab- 



On behalf of the Black Student 
Union, I would like the University 
community to know that the be- 
havior of some of the students was 
disorderly and insulting. I also sug- 
gest that before anymore "concern- 
ed students" shout discrimination, 
they should analyze their own be- 
havior first. 

Thank you, 

Marina C. Bamett 

President, Black Student Uni(Hi 



pus 




ARM YOURSELF 

AT THE 

BOOK CENTER 

All writing instruments 

50% OFF 
Oct. T-Oct. 23 



■■ITGa ■ ■ ■i(Continued from Page 2) 

What proceeded afterward was a nearly private conversation 
among Judge Greiner, District Attorney William Kern, and various de- 
fense attorneys. Neither Judge Greiner's nor Kern's microphone am- 
plified either voice enough so I could sit back in my seat. But because 
of this, I, in the third row, had to sit on the edge of my seat with my 
ear turned to the bench. This seemed to be the case of the couple in 
front of me also. Kern would start off strong, then quickly drop his 
voice to mumble the rest of his sentence. On one occasion, a simple 
misunderstanding delayed the court another 10 minutes. 

As I understand it, public proceedings are precisely that — which 
the name implies — public. What went on that Monday appeared to 
be more of a nearly private conference among a handful of men. Is 
this the way in which justice is delegated in Clarion County? I sincere- 
ly hope not. Rather, Fd like to give just one suggestion not to any one 
individual, but to the Clarion County Court System as a whole — if 
it's justice that is to be heard, then let it be heard. 

AT 

CARDTOWNE 

We're ready for Halloween! 

ARE YOU? 

Come and see us 






\ SAeAfi Anti4t^tu 



MANICURES '5.00 

OFFER EXPIRES OCT. 31 



LOCATED ON THE 
CORNER OF 8th ft MArN 

PHONE: 226-6100 



HOURS: MON.FRI.: 9-9 SAT.:9-5 



•APPOINTMENT SUGGESTED 



by Liz Koones 
News Editor 



Almost two weeks ago, a loop- 
hole in Florida's gun control law 
made it easier for residents of the 
state to obtain a concealed 
weapons permit, and eliminated 
local gun control ordinances. The 
new law also removed a ban 
against open display of certain 
weapons. Last week, the law was 
repealed. 

Although the law was short 
lived, it has brought the issue of 
gun control back into the lime- 
light. Currently, gun owners are 
protected by the Federal Fire- 
arms Owners Protection Act, 
passed in 1986. The act liberalizes 
the inter-state sale of firearms 
when sales are legal in both 
states, gives mandatory penal- 
ties for the use of a firearm dur- 
ing a federal crime, calls for in- 
spections of dealer records, 
limits seizure of firearms and 
provides for the return of seized 
firearms. 

In that same year, Detroit en- 
acted a law providing mandatory 
jail terms of 30-90 days for carry- 
ing concealed weapons. Massa- 
chusetts enacted a minimum 
one-year term for illegal gun pos- 
session, but the handgun - 
murder rate remained the same. 
A similar law passed in New 
York state sent roughly one out of 
every five criminals to prison. 

The National Rifle Association 



supports the FOP Act, but feels 
that it and other state laws are 
too strict. Hie NRA feels that 
people who have done their best 
to comply with the laws are 
forced to bear the stigma of Fed- 
eral felons. 

Hie NRA is considered one of 
the most powerful special 
interest groups in Washington. 
The NRA lists both President 
Reagan and Vice President Bush 
as members. Few legislators will 
oppose the group. 

What stands in the NRA's way 
of relaxing gun control laws are 
small, but vocal, interest groups 
wanting stricter gun controls. 
These groups are asking for a 
waiting period and background 
checks for prospective gun 
buyers, mandatory licensing of 
anyone carrying a gun outside 
the home and mandatory safety 
training for anyone who buys a 
handgun. 

Conflict arises between the 
NRA and these groups over how 
much freedom gun users should 
have. The NRA feels that the 
people who bear the brunt of gun 
control laws are not necessarily 
the most dangerous criminals. 
The other groups feel that gun 
control should be strict for all 
groups. 

Both groups must work to bal- 
ance the need for efficient law en- 
forcement with the right of 
hon^t citizens to constitutional 
protections. 



wtOrGa ■ ■ .(Continued from Page 1) 

of school. Part of the problem and then buy their books, 

is the professors giving large Staying open longer hours 

assignments right away or would not be cost effective for 

students tiring to buy books the bookstore. Biertempfel 

after only having one or two says, "There is only the 

classes. To avoidf some of the physical space of the store to 

confusion, students should accommodate all the stu- 

wait a few days and go to dents. The lines for textbooks 

most, if not all of their classes are usually less in the spring." 



91ie fiiste/ts 0^ 

JkUpka Sigma ^m 



Fall Pledge Class 
of 1987 



Jennifer Goodrich 
Patty Hauber 
Mary Jo Hughes 
Cathy McConnell 



Tracey Oliver 
Lori Rider 
Stacey Slat 
Michele Williams 



We Love Youl 



THE CLARION CALL, Clarion, PA, Thursday, Oct. 15, 1987-f 




N EWS— 




249 Donate 

Bloodmobile gets second highest turnout 



by Steve Ferringer 
News Staff Writer 



On Wednesday, Oct. 7, 
the American Ked Cross 
Blood Mobile visited Clar- 
ion University, and was 
greeted by 249 donors. 
This was the first of three 
visits by the Blood Mobile 
slated for this academic 
year, according to Dave 
Smith, Regional Donor 
Consultant. 

"This was the second 
best we've collected at the 
school," said Smith. He 
said that 207 of the donors 
were repeat donors and 47 
were first timers. 

Although it is not 
possible to contract AIDS 



by donating blood, there 
has been a drop in dona- 
tions due to people's fear 
and ignorance. Smith said, 
"Nationwide, there is a de- 
crease, but our region has 
not experienced a de- 
crease because of the 
AIDS threat." Smith at- 
tributed that to the fact 
that Clarion is a rural area 
and that the Red Cross has 
published many edu- 
cational handouts on the 
AIDS issue. 

Assisting the Red Cross 
were Alpha Phi Omega, 
Ali)ha Sigma Tau, 
University Women and 
Dominos Pizza, who do- 
nated piza for all the 
donors. 



A contest was held by 
Alpha Phi Omega, which 
sponsored a plaque to be 
given to the one sorority 
and fraternity who donat- 
ed the most. This year's 
winners were Phi Sigma 



Kappa and Zeta Tau 
Alpha. Both their names 
wiU be engraved on the 
plaque, andthe plaque will 
be rotated between the two 
on a semesterly basis. The 
organization who has its 



name on the plaque most 
often when the plaque be- 
comes full, will get to keep 
it. 

The Blood Mobile will 
return to Clarion on Janu- 
ary 28, 1988. 



Program geared to 
unite young with old 



by Lisa Hampe, 
News Staff Writer 



Adopt A Grandparent is a 
special program used by the 
darion Health Care Manor to 
unite young people with older 
people. 

Trie program consists of the 
student being matched with a 
compatible "grandparent." 
The student treats his or her 
adopted "grandparent" just 
as if they were their real 
grandparents. The student 
spends several hours a week 
with their "grandparent." 
They help write letters, read, 
or just talk. Many of the Man- 
or's residents are professional 
people; teachers, doctors, 



lawyers, etc. Tliese people en- 
joy hearing from the students 
about everything that is going 
on at the University, about 
their job search or anything 
else that interests the students. 
Tlie "grandparents" may also 
be able to give advice to the 
student, based on their own 
emeriences. 

Bert Lauder, Activities Di- 
rector at the Clarion Health 
Care Manor, said, "Adopt A 
Grandparent is a really nice 
program. It not only works to 
help the people residing there, 
it also helps students to see 
what the nursing home is 
about. It helps to make the 
studaits feel more comfort- 




,-sf , « «»''"' 



TESTING Nurse Linda Botts gives 

able with older people." 

Persons mterested in the 
"Adopt A Grandparent" pro- 
gram may contact Bert 
Lauder, Activities Director at 
the Clarion Health Care 
Manor or call the Campus 
Ministry Office at 226-6402. 



Debbie Mosier a blood test prior to donating blood at the Red Cross Blood Mobile. 

Photo courtesy of The Sequelle 



International business meeting set 



Today's world tends to be 
increasingly internationalized, 
especially in the business 
arear This situation makes 
some awareness of interna- 
tional business affairs absol- 
utely realistic as well as nec- 
essary for the students who 
wish to work in business and 
other relevant areas. 

In or(ter to provide students 
with an opportunity to learn 
about an area that is increas- 
ingly important, CUP 
introduced a new academic 
program, the International 
Busmess Program, now in its 
second year. We live in an in- 
creasingly interdependent 
world, a£d perhaps someday 
we will live in world without 
bOTdCTS," said Dr. S.N. Sohng, 
the Program Coordinator. 

The program includes four 



requirements. First of all, stu- 
dents must complete four 
upper division international 
business courses. Secondly, 
students must complete two 
international cultural courses. 

The third requirement is 
foreign experience. This can 
be fulfilled in a variety of 
ways. A stud^t can partici- 
pate in a co-op or internship 
course for a foreign country or 
in the U.S. A student can study 
abroad for a period, or can 
complete BSAD 437: Interna- 
tional Business Seminar. 

Finally, a student must 
show competency in any lang- 
uage other than English. 

"International Business 
Program is not limited to bus- 
iness students, but is open to 
almost any major . There- 
fore, the program is a useful 



suii^lement that will enhance 
the credentials of many bus- 
iness students and non-bus- 
iness majors," said Professor 
Sohng. 

Since it is a very useful 
addition to other degree pro- 
grams, students are advised 
to plan carefully to fit the 
components into their four 
years. Interested students can 
attend a general information 
meeting on TTiursday, Oct. 15 
in Room 103 Still Hall at 7 p.m. 
A film tiUed "Bridging Cul- 
ture Gap" will be shown at the 
meeting. 

SEEKING BANDS 

Interhall Council is looking for 
bands to play at Thursday Night 
Dances. For more information, 
contact Jean Vest at 2388 between 
1:30-4:30 p.m. Monday through Fri- 
day., 



Oct. 


15: 


Oct. 


18: 


Oct. 


17: 


Oct. 


18: 


Oct. 


19: 



Oct. 20: 



Oct. 21: 



Oct. 
Oct. 



15: 
16: 



Oct. 17: 



Oct. 18: 



Oct. 
Oct. 
Oct. 



19: 



20: 



21: 



CAMPUS CALENDAR 

ACADEMIC AND INFORMATIONAL 

December graduation applications due (Registrar's Office) 

Intramural Roster Due (Foul Shooting) 

ROTO field training exercises begin. 

Jumma Meeting, Room 40, Campbell, 1 p.m. 

QMAT will be given 

ROTO field training exercises end 

Policy committee meeting, 140 Peirce, 4 p.m. 

Pre-reglstration for the 1%8 Spring semester begins 

Athletic Department "Time Out" luncheon, Holiday Inn, 12 noon 

Share the Word scripture study, 140 Peirce, 4-5 p.m. 

"Church Chat: The Catholic Church • Who Are We?" 140 Peirce, 

4-5 p.m. 

ENTERTAINMENT 

Drama Performance, "Greater Tuna," Little Theatre, 8:15 p.m. 
Drama Performance, "Greater Tuna," Little Theatre, 8:15 p.m. 
Kolnonia Scavenger Hunt, Campbell, 6:30 p.m. 
CB presents "Rev. Billy C. Wirtz, comedian," RC, 8 p.m. 
Drama Performance, "Greater Tuna," Little Theatre, 8:15 p.m. 
CAB'S, Harvey Multi-Purpose, 9:30 p.m. 
Quadco presents "Spindler and Kennedy, piano a^d voice," 
Marwick-Boyd Aud., 3 p.m. 

Newman Association Picnic at Cook Forest, Newman House, 
2 p.m. 

Faculty Recital, Dr. Jack Hall, trumpet/brass quintet, Marwick- 
Boyd Aud., 8:15 p.m. 

Data Processing Management Association Meeting, 7 p.m. at 
151 Becker Hall. 
"Woman to Woman" program, Music Hall, 12 noon. 



by Tara Ramirez 
News Staff Writer 



6— THE CLARION CALL, Clarion, PA, Thursday. Oct. 15, 1967 

Computers improve 
campus departments 

and are making good use of it. 
She stated, ^'Once people 
learn it is not mj^terious, they 
become comfortable with it." 
Green has no real com- 
plaints or problems with the 
computers, only that they 
have started to go through the 
minting ribbons fast, but to 
near that's a good sign of their 
success. 

Another project currently 
happening is in Campbell 
Hall. Morris said that all of the 
dorms on campus have at 
least one Apple and one IBM 
with monitors and disk drives. 

Mr. Marc Solomon, Direc- 
tor of the Computer Center, 
said that there will be one IBM 
P.C. installed in Campbell to 
act as a terminal to cual into 
the Vax computer in Still Hall. 
Solomon stated that the 
machine will be installed as a 
pilot program to see how 
much use the students in the 
dorms make of it. From this 
they wiU speculate the good of 
the machine and make a re- 
commendation to add more or 
to stop the program. 

Senior John Press, CAIS 
major, along with Jan Slater 
are coordinating the program 
for the housing of^ce. Press 
said that the project is a joint 
effort with the computer 
c^ter and the housing omce. 



There have been constant 
improvements on campus due 
to new computer facilities, ac- 
cording to Mr. Barry Morris, 
Director of Residence Life. 

Tliere are new computers in 
many departments on cam- 
pus. The most recent and big- 
gest project in a department is 
in the Writing Center. A 
computer lab was opened on 
September 14 to all of the stu- 
dent body, for their word pro- 
cessing needs. 

Since the lab opened, the 
writing center has seen an in- 
crease in the numbers of stu- 
dents using the systems. Dr. 
Lois I. Green, Director of the 
Writing Center, stated that 
they have "gone from a base 
of ten students to 75 in the five 
weeks the lab has been open- 
ed." She said that the lat) is 
full most of the time and there 
have even been times when all 
of the machines are in use. 
Green said that the lab has 
been successful and is being 
utilized well. 

Green credited the exper- 
tise of the lab's tutors for the 
lab's quality. She said that stu- 
dents go into the lab and in 
about twenty minutes become 
comfortable with the system 



Clarion Video Center 



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Computer Experience. 

on campus. 



, .A student works diligently on a computer. There are new computers in many departments 

Photo by Cheryle Natasi, Staff Photographer 



TTie computer is being in- computer system with dial up machine. Also, there will be 

stalled and, starting October priviledges, and must bring an instruction manual and one 

19, will be opened 24 hours for their school identification. qualified person to answer 

all on-campus students. TTie desk clerk at Campbell questions. 

Students will be required to will open the lab and show the 

have an account on the VAX-A students how to operate the 

Conference recruits college seniors 



Career Conference of Amer- 
ica, Inc. has scheduled Car- 
eerTrak '88, its second annual 
College Recruitment Confer- 
ence, for February 17 and 18 
at New York aty's Penta Ho- 
tel. 

TTie first conference of its 
kind held last February, 
CareerTrak '87 brought 
together coUege recruitment 
professionals from major U.S. 
firms and federal government 
agencies with college seniors 
from over 105 colleges and 
universities. Such fu-ms as 
Aetna Life and Casualty, Ray- 
theon, Bank of New York, 
Amerada Hess and New York 
Telephone attended Career- 
Trak '87 and added to the suc- 
* cess of the conference. 




Tlie purpose of the confer- 
ence is to bring coUege re- 
cruiters and job seeking sen- 
iors together in an atmo- 
sphere conducive to success- 
ful interviewing and hiring. 

"CareerTrak '87 was an un- 
qualified success," said Mark 
Grove, President of Career 
Conferences of America, Inc. 
"It provided students with an 
opportunity to meet and inter- 
view with a large number of 
prestigious employers in one 
location. The unique format of 
CareerTrak '87 allowed the 
students to increase their job 
opportunities and make im- 
portant personal contacts with 
key hiring representatives." 

Om* CareerTrak conference 
fills a definite need," said Joe 
Price, Executive Vice Presi- 



dent of Career Conferences of 
America, Inc. **We select 
seniors in 40 major 
disciplines, from over 200 
schools in the Northeast and 
Mid-Atlantic U.S, and invite 
them to New York City. From 
all indications, "CareerTrak 
'88 will by far top the success 
of last year's conference. Col- 
lege seniors wiU be able to 
meet with firms like Salomon 
Brothers, Xerox Corporation, 
The Prudential, Arco Chemi- 
cal, U.S. Sprint, and many 
more." 

Interested seniors should 
send current resumes before 
December 15th directly to: 
Career Conferences of Ameri- 
ca, Inc. P. 0. Box 1852, New 
Haven, CT 06508. 



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Solutions to partying 
probiem discussed 



THE CLARION CALL, Clarion, PA, Thursday, Oct. 15, 1987--7 



by Ron George, 
News Staff Writer 



At the October 12 Faculty 
Senate meeting, Dr. Stephen 
Ainsworth, Chairman of the 
Student Affairs Committee, 
reported that an open meeting 
wm be held on October 27th 
from 2:00 to 4:30 p.m. in 208 
Founders to discuss problems 
of "first day registration," 
along with other topics. 

In other reports, Dr. Sylvia 
Stalker, Chairman of the 
Institutional Resources 
Committee, presented some of 
the ideas she encountered at a 
recent meeting of the Parking 
Committee. According to 
Stalker, some of the solutions 
to the campus parking 
problem which were mention- 
ed at that meeting, are raising 
the fine for unauthorized park- 
ing from $2 to $5 and luniting 
permits to Students and 
faculty who live outside a 
specified distance from the 
campus. 

Stalker also noted that 36 
parking spaces were added 
this year and that the commit- 
tee is considering the addition 
of60 more spaces. 



Dr. Frank Sessions spoke 
before the senate concerning 
the Graduate Studies Pro- 
gram and the Continuing 
Education Program. 

Sessions said that when he 
began working with the Grad- 
uate Program, one of his ob- 
jectives was to increase the 
number of assistantships. 
However, he added that since 
then. Clarion has surpassed 
practically all other schools in 
the state system in offering 
assistantships. According to 
Sessions, Clarion is currently 



offering 156 assistantships. 

In the future. Sessions said 
Clarion will "have to cut 
back" the number of assist- 
antships. He said that those 
departments which have in- 
creased the number of assist- 
antships will probably reduce 
that number by about 10 
percent. 

Sessions also discussed the 
establishment of a teleconfer- 
ence center at Clarion. Cur- 
rently, the university is able to 
receive televised conferences 
via satellite. These confer- 
ences provide an opportunity 
to see and hear leaders in 
business and medicine as well 
as other fields, as they discuss 
current problems and ideas. 
TTie next conference Clarion 
will receive will be in Novem- 
ber and is entitled "Assertive 
Management Skills . " In 
January a conference will be 

Presented entitled "Chronic 
diseases of Women. ' ' 

Dr. Peter Dalby announced 
that Faculty Senate's sugges- 
tion to include the final exams 
schedule in the scheduling 
paper may be implemented 
during the spring semester. 

TTie committee reports in- 
cluded an announcement from 
Dr. Robert Girvan, Chairman 
of the Committee on Courses 
and Programs of Study, that 
special topics course LS 576, 
Library Personnel Manage- 
ment, will be offered in the 
summer of 1988. 

Dr. Ainsworth announced 
that Dr. Madelyn Jablon of the 
English department was 
elected Chairman of the Sub- 
committee on Student Activi- 
ties. 

The next Faculty Senate 
meeting will be held Oct. 26 at 
4 p.m. inl40Peirce. 



1988 Spring Semester 
pre-registration dates 

Students may pre-register for the 1988 Spring Semester according 
toihe following schedule: 

CrMlHs Earned as of 1 0/1 2/87 



OctolMr 19 101 -h Credits 

Octot>er 20 96-100 Credits 

October 21 88-95 Credits 

Octot)er 22 76-87 Credits 

Octot)er 23 67-75 Credits 

Octot>er 26 63-66 Credits 

October 27 59-62 Credits 

October 28 52-58 Credits 

October 29 39-51 Credits 

October 30 33-38 Credits 



November 2 31-32 Credits 

November 3 29-30 Credits 

November 4 25-28 Credits 

November 5 12-24 Credits 

November 6 1-11 Credits 

November 9 Credits (OI-HU)* 

November 10 Credits (IG-MI)* 

November 11 Credits (MO-SE)* 

November 12 Credits (SH-ZI)' 

November 13 Credits (AA-OE)' 

* FIrat two letter* of etudenl's lut name 



Please check the Pre-Reglstration Priority List which will be posted 
at the Wood Street entrance of the Carlson Library Building on Mon- 
day, Oct. 12. 

Copies of the spring semester schedule of classes will be available 
at the Office of the Registrar, 122 Carrier, on Wednesday, Oct. 14. 

Students who do not pre-register by Friday, Nov. 13, will be required 
to report on registration day Tuesday, Jan. 19, 1988, to schedule 
classes. 



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8-THE CLARION CALL. CKrIon. PA, Thursday, Oct. 15, 1967 



Jackson officially in presidential race 



by Vonda S warts 
News Staff Writer 



Jesse Jackson is back in the 
running for the presidency. 
Jackson formally announced 
his candidacy on Saturday. 

TTus is Jackson's second run 
for the presidency. But this 
time is cufferent for Jackson, 
because he leads in the poles. 
Jackson has toned down his 
image. He now wears brown 
suits and wing-tip shoes. He 
has also toned his voice down 
and is riding on the good-will 
of the Democratic party. 

He is getting high marks 
from the political pros on his 



support of the farmers, at- 
tacks on multi-national 
corporations and his talks 
agamst drug use. 

Although some feel he won't 
win, they do expect him to 
help one of the others win. 

Jackson feels that ''matters 
of sin" should be left to the 
church and not to the public. 

A Future for the PTL? 

Many people involved in 
PTL are confused about the 
future. On Thursday, Jerry 
Falwell announced he was 
quitting. 

Hie employees are worried 
about their future at PTL and 



FROM 

ALL 

POINTS 




many won't get paid on Thurs- 
day. 
The staff is split. Some are 



moving on to other jobs and 
others are staying behind to 
rebuild PTL. 

Most of the remaining staff 
don't want the Bakkers to re- 
turn and feel that it would just 
undermine the rebuilding of 
PTL. Others want them back 
and don't believe that the 
Bakkers' return would harm 
PTL. 
Meeting House Reopened 

The USA's oldest standing 
black church reopened its 
doors on Sunday. 

Ilie church was the birth- 
place of the abolishionist 
movement. Tlie building has 



many historical events in its 
past. The church hosted many 
speakers such as Abolitionist 
William Lloyd Garrison, 
Frederick Douglas, and Har- 
riet Tubman. Also occurring 
in the church were a school, 
the organization of the first 
all-black CivU War recent 
and it was a key stop in the 
underground railroad. 

The building has served as a 
church and community center 
and then it served as a Jewish 
synagogue until 1972. The Na- 
tional Park Service donated $1 
million for renovation. 



THE CLARION CALL, Clarion, PA, Thursday, Oct. 15, 1987-9 




Volunteer slated to 
show effects of alcohol 



In observance of National 
Alcohol Awareness Week, 
and to better educate stu- 
dents on the effects of alcohol 
and safe consumption, Camp- 
beU Hall will be sponsoring a 
"Cheers" type bar in their 
lobby on Sunday at 8: 30 p.m. 

Tlie bar will offer non-alco- 
holic punch and bar-type foods 
such as chips and pretzels. 
Tliere will be speakers from 
Public Safety, Clarion Bor- 
ough Police, an Adult Proba- 
tion officer, and others. 

There will be a live demon- 
stration of the effects of alco- 
hol on a volunteer. Also, the 
breathalizer test will be 



demonstrated. 

TTie "Cheers" bar is open to 
all students on campus who 
are interested in learning 
more about alcohol, its 
effects, and laws pertaining to 
it. 



WE'RE OPEN 
TIL 9 P.M. 

ApoUodorus 

526 MAIN ST., CLARION 

226-5431 

DISCS, LP's & 
CASSETTES 



Test of Skill. 

Harvey Hall. 



.Bikers David "Punch" Konieczko and Anthony Debaldo weave their way through the maze of trees by 

Photo by Frank Lotlto, Staff Ptiotograpfter 



Institute to award 60 fellowships 



Approximately 60 Doctoral 
Fellowships in Biological Sci- 
ences will be awarded by the 
Howard Hughes Medical In- 
stitute (HHMI), in an inter- 
national competition. The 
goal of HHMI is to support the 
education of outstandmg pro- 
spective investigators to en- 
sure the strength and vigor of 
the pool for biomedical re- 
search. 

HHMI welcomes applica- 
tions from all qualified in- 
dividuals and strongly 
encourages members of mi- 
nority group and women to 
compete fully in this program. 

Applicants may be citizens 
or nationals of the United 
States or foreign nationals. 
Awards will be made for study 
in research based on doctoral 
programs in biological sci- 
ences in the current areas of 
HHMI sponsored research in 
cell biology and regulation, 
immunolo©^, genetics, neuro- 
science, and structural bio- 
log^. 

Each award includes an an- 
nual stipend of $12,300 for 12 



month tenures to the student, 
and an annual cost-of-educa- 
tion allowance of $10,700 in 
lieu of all tuition and assessed 
fees. TTie fellowships will be 
for three years with an option 
to extend for an additional two 
years. 

The fellowships are in- 
tended for students at or near 
the beginninjg of their grad- 
uate study in the biological 
sciences. Applicants must not 
have completed, by the begin- 
ning of the Fall 1987 term, 
more than 24 semester hours, 
36 quarter hours, or equiva- 
lent of graduate-level study in 
the biological sciences fol- 
lowing completion of the bac- 
calaureate degree. 

Foreign and nationals for 
whom English is not the pri- 
mary language are required 
to submit scores from the Test 
of English as a Foreign Lang- 
uage (TOEFL). 

ftie deadline for applica- 
tions is Nov. 13, 1987. An- 
nouncement of the awards will 
be in March of 1988. Awardees 
must begin fellowship tenure 



no later than Fall 1988. Awar- 
dees must begin fellowship 
tenure no later than FaU 1988. 
For information and applica- 
tion materials contact Hughes 
Doctoral Fellowships, The 
Fellowship Office, National 
Research Council, 2101 Con- 
stitution Avenue, Washington, 
D.C. 20418 or caU (202) 334- 
2872. 



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Roving Reporter Asks: 

Do you feel intimidated by AIDS in Clarion? 








Scott Hendrix 
Senior, Math 
No, because I don't know any 
homosexuals in the Clarion area. 



Ruth Bermudez. 
Junior, Political Science 
No. AIDS is not a problem that af- 
fects me. 



Sheldon Johnson 
Junior, Political Science/Economics 

Yes. I've taken precautionary mea- 
sures to ensure prosperity and in- 
tegrity within my historical and tra- 
ditional lifestyle. 



Beth Ptaszaiewcz 
Freshman, Education 
No, it doesn't bother me unless 
I'm involved in the situation. 



Caria Young 
Grad. Student, Reading Ed. 
"Personally no, because I'm 
very selective." 



Photos and Questions by Mike Bordo and Peter "B" McMlllen 
Features Staff Writers 



Manor lease may not be renewed 



by Suzanne Halleman, 
News Staff Writer 



The December expiration of 
the lease on Forest Manor was 
a major topic discussed at 
Tuesday's Student Senate 
Meeting. 

Clarion University leases 
Forest Manor. The Manor 
houses approximately 500 stu- 
dents and right now there are 
200 vacancies. Last year the 
university lost $200,000 due to 
the lack of residents. 

Dr. George Curtis, Vice 
President of Student Affairs, 
said, "The university can no 
longer operate under a lease 
which puts us in that financial 
position." The university will 
not buy the property and there 



is the possibility that they will 
not re-lease Forest Manor. 

There were plans 10 years 
ago to build a new housing 
facility, but the government 
legislature does not fund for 
auxiliary facilities such as 
resident halls. They have to be 
built through a Bond issue, 
which is unlikely. "I don't see 
a new residence hall in the fu- 
ture," said Dr. Curtis. "Hous- 
ing really won't be a problem 
thou^, because last spring all 
the students could have been 
housed without Forest Manor 
and that was even before Bal- 
lentine Hall," he said. 

Re-negotiations with the 
property owners of Forest 
Manor will take place next 
week. 



Classified Ads 



On Campus Travel Representative 
or Organization Needed to pro- 
mote Spring Break Trip to Flor- 
ida. Earn Money, Free Trips, Val- 
uable Work Experience!! Call In- 
ter-Campus-Programs (1-800-433- 
7747). 

Come into Avon for Christmas by 
Oct. 17 and get a free ladies 
Breathless Cologne. Call 764- 
3446. 

MOM - Happy Birthday! I wish I 
could be there with you. Hope you 
have a great day. Try to get out on 
that golf course! I Love You, Maria 

EARN Ihundred weeklyl in your 
spare time. United Services of 
America is looking for home work- 
ers to perform maU services. In- 
centive programs available. For 
information send large self-ad- 
dressed stamped envelope to 
U.S.A. 24307 Magic Mtn. Pkway; 
Suite No. 306, Valencia, CA 91355. 

SURPLUS CARS sell for $155 (aver- 
age) ! Also jeeps, trucks, etc. Now 
Available. Your Area. Info 805- 
687-6000 Ext. S-6334. 

H0MEW0RKER8 WANTED!!! 
TOP PAY!! C.I. 121 24th Ave., 
N.W. Suite 222, Norman, OK 73069. 



Furnished House for 6-8 people. 
Available for Spring term. $650 a 
Semester, not including utilities. 
Call 226-6555. 

2 TRUMPETS, Stradivarius, Model 
43 Bach; Olds Ambassador. Con- 
toct 2264763, 226-6009. 

The BROTHERS of PHI SIGMA 
KAPPA would like to thank the 
SISTERS of DELTA ZETA for a 
fantastic mixer last week! ! ! 

LOST: 2 Wilson sting racquets in 
black Wilson bag on Mon., Oct. 5. 
Left on red benches at Campbell 
Courts. PLEASE return, RE- 
WARD will be given!! CaU 226- 
2248 or 226-6375 or return to 105 
Tippin Gym. 

To the BROTHERS of PHI SIGMA 
KAPPA Thanks for a heavenly 
time at pledge pick-up! We had a 
GREAT time! LOVE, the 
SISTERS of SIGMA SIGMA SIG- 
MA. 



TYPEWRITER RENTALS. LIFT- 
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PLUS DEPOSIT. 
CLARION OFFICE EQUIPMENT 

RT. 66 South, 22fr«740. 



A motion was made by Tim 
Murray to accept the amend- 
ments to the CSA constitution. 
Those amendments are that 
active members with full 
voting privileges shall be 16 
senators with 32 or more 
credits, four senators with 31 
or less credits. They must 
have a 2.20 or better cumula- 
tive grade point average, and 
must maintain it throughout 
their entire term of office. 

The Rules and Regulations 
Committee is developing a 
new process for evaluating 
representative organizations 
on campus. They will set up 
guidelines for the advisors to 
follow. There are 120 
organizations on campus. 
Each month they may 
possibly review seven or- 
ganizations to see if they are 
following regulations, and 
doing what they are supposed 
to be doing. The guidelines 
should be established within 
the next three weeks. 

The Elections committee 
reported that petitions for Stu- 
dSt Senators are in room 222 
Egbert. Petitions are due in 
two weeks. 
UndCT the PubUc Relations 



Committee, posters will be out The next Student Senate 

advertising Student Senate, meeting will be held Tuesday, 

"Meet the Candidates" night October 20, at 7 p.m. in 140 

will be held November 5. Peirce. 

5th AVENUE BAR AND GRILI 

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Offer good through October 






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WOMEN OF SPIRIT 

Mary Magdalene's Witness 

*Discussion Group on Feminist Theology* 

Wednesday, Oct. 21, 7 : 30 p.m. - 112 Harvey 

Sponsored by United Campus Ministry - 226-6402 ^^. 

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10-THE CLARION CALL, Clarion, PA, Thursday, Oct. 15, 1987 



Russian Club open to entire community 



by Kimberly Harkless 
Features Staff Writer 



Contrary to what people 
might thinik, you don't have to 
be a Russian, a Russian ma- 
jor, or even speak the Russian 
language in order to partici- 
page in the Russian Club. TTie 
club is open not only to the 
Clarion University students 
but to the entire Clarion com- 
munity as well. 

The Russian Club was 
formed in Clarion in 1970 upon 
the request of some students 
who wished to become more 
involved with cultural activi- 
ties and ideas of the Soviet 
Union. 

The club participates in a 



number of fascinating activi- 
ties including traveling to per- 
form, on stage, Russian plays, 
dances, and songs. However, 
the talents don't stop there, 
the club's own members de- 
sign and sew the ethnic 
costumes needed for those 
productions. Preparing 
Russian cuisine is another of 
the club's favorite activities. 
They sponsor on-campus fibns 
and lectures concerning 
Soviet cultural status, so that 
members can experience for 
themselves certain cultural 
aspects. The club also spon- 
sors field trips to view such 
things as churches, Russian 
ballets, and poets. The club 



also sends some of its mem- 
bers to visit the Soviet Union 
during the summer. 

For the fourth consecutive 
year, the Russian Club has 
had its own radio program on 

The club participates 
in a number of fascin- 
ating activities, in- 
cluding performing in 
plays, dances, and 
songs. 

WCUC. The program airs 
every Tuesday at 4 p.m. and 
involves such aspects as Rus- 
sian culture, literature, his- 




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tory, news, and, of course, 
music. Tlie program has been 
so successful that area schools 
are now using it in their social 
studies programs because of 
its good quality and informa- 
tive content. 

To satisfy the wide diversity 
of member interests, the club 
is made up of several commit- 
tees. TTiey include public re- 
lations, gourmet, sewing, art, 
dancing, singing, and a re- 
cently initiated d&ess commit- 
tee. The people that make up 



these committees share the 
opportunity to learn about 
another country, its people 
and its culture while, at the 
same time, having fun. Ask 
the Russian Club President, 
Pamela Twigg or Advisor, Dr. 
Nikoulin about it. 

The meetings are held 
every second Wednesday at 7 
p.m. in Founders Hall. At the 
next meeting, Oct. 21, the club 
presents Lieutenant Colonel 
Faulkner, who will speak on 
US-USSR disarmament. 
Admission is free. 



Yoga classes kicked 
off Illinois campus 



CHICAGO, IL (CPS) - 
Yoga is a religion, and doesn't 
belong on college campuses, a 
group of ministers says. 

The group of six ministers 
asked Morton College and Tri- 
ton CoUege to stop offering 
noncredit courses in yoga, 
calling it a form of religious 
worship that the schools, by 
offering them, endorse. 

"It's an offense against 
Christianity," said lay min- 
ister John Borgraud, who 
added his group also wants the 
schools to drop courses on 
parapsychology, astrology 
and anything having to do 
with Eastern mysticism. 

Rev. BiU Arruda of Hills- 
dale (111.) Baptist Church, an- 
other member of the group, 
explained, "yoga is to hindu- 
ism what prayer is to Chris- 
tian and Jewish religions. " 

"We are very concerned 
about the teaching of the oc- 
cult," added Rev. Richard 
Wager of the Emmanuel Bible 
Church in Berwyn, M., Wag- 
er's congregants are sending 
{)rotest letters to the two col- 
eges. 

Morton spokesman Michael 
Truppa termed the class in 
question. Exploration in Para- 
psychology, a "hobby or lei- 
sure time course." 

While Morton will keep the 
course on its schedule for now, 
Tru]^ said the schools' law- 
yers advised him not to com- 
ment further because of the 
"potential for litigation." 

Triton Vice President Janet 
Kooi tried to diffuse the con- 
troversy by meeting with the 
ministers' group, and showing 
it an outiine of the course. 

Charles Milligan, a religion 
mt)fessor at the Iliff School of 
iTieology in Denver, thought 



the ministers' objections 
"narrow minded." 

"Remember," he coun- 
seled, "that many silly and 
stupid things are taught under 
the rubric of Christianity and 
other religions. 

U.S. Secretary of Education 
William Bennett last year 
raised scholarly hackles by 
giving New York University 
Prof. Paul Vitz a second grant 
to see if the "role of religion" 
has been excluded from 
American history texts. 

Vitz already had published 
one report asserting that it 
has. 

In early September, more- 
over, federal appeals courts 
overturned two controversial 
1986 rulings which allowed 
Christian fundamentalist 
parents to teach then- children 
at home from "Christian" 
books of their own choosing, 
and that barred from 
Alabama schools 42 texts 
some Christian groups 
considered as tracts promot- 
ing a religion called secular 
humanism." 

Finally, Texas Attorney 
General Jim Mattox stopped 
the University of Texas at 
Arlington from combining its 
religion and philosophy de- 
partments because the 
teachers were paid by local 
churches, not the state. 

Mattox said the arrange- 
ment amounted to letting 
religious groups use state 
facilities to promote their 
philosophies by people who, 
b^^use they were not subject 
to the same campus regula- 
tions as other professors, did 
not necessarily meet profes- 
sional faculty standards. 




LSHIRES } 

We offer flowers-by-wire service. 226-7070 8 




THE CLARION CALL, Clarion, PA, Thursday, Oct. 15, 1987—11 



FEATURES 



Alumni Spotlight 

Wilshire's work - a success at Clarion 




by Susan Smith, 
Features Staff Writer 



Outstanding Alumnus. . . Ron Wil- 
shire, a 1972 graduate from CUP. 

Photo by Mike Bordo, 
Photography Editor 



For most of us, Clarion is 
our home away from home, 
but for others it is their native 
town. Upon commencement 
some graduates choose to 
begin a new life elsewhere, for 
others Qarion remains their 
home. Ron Wilshire is one 
alumni who resides in Qarion 
and continues to actively con- 
tribute to Clarion through 
University employment and 
chief spokespjerson for CUP 
and is me Liaison and Execu- 
tive Director of the Qarion 
University Alumni Associa- 
tion. 

In the nine years that he has 
been director, he has accum- 
conmiunity involvement. 

Ron has been the director of 
Alunmi and Public Affairs at 
CUP since 1978. Under that 
titie he is responsible for the 
public relations, alumni 
relation and sports informa- 
tion programs. He acts as the 
ulated quite a list of accom- 



plishments, especially in the 
area of alumni. He has de- 
veloped an alumni magazine 
which consists of class up- 
dates, campus news donation 
reports and various articles of 
interest. He has computerized 
records of alumni and set up 
alumni nights where close to 
500 people meet at various 
locations. Dues have been 
eliminated by having an 
annual fund drive as well as 
merger with the Clarion Uni- 
versity Foundation. In the 
Public Relations field, Ron 
has broadened the news 
coverage of the University 
and has increased community 
relations. 

Along with his involvement 
in the University he devotes 
time to the town of Clarion. He 
serves as the president of 
Clarion Borough Council, vice 
president of the Qarion Coun- 
ty United Way and is a mem- 
ber of various clubs. 

Because of involvement 
both in college and commu- 
nity the Town/Gown relation- 
ship is something Ron trys to 



uphold. His thoughts are, "It 
is probably a pretty good im- 
age; there are only minor 
problems relating to stu- 
dents." He feels the major 
problem is in off-campus 
housing where some students 
have not learned to respect 
the community and the resi- 
dents. 

Prior to college, Ron served 
in ttie U.S. Army from 1966-69 
in Transportation and Opera- 
tions in Thailand. He 
graduated in 1972 with a B.S. 
in Business Administration 
and then in 1974 with a M.S. in 
Communication. 

I asked him what contrasts 
he could make in the students 
today compared to when he 
was a student. He comment- 
ed, "Students have not 
changed much, they are more 
conservative and overall 
more job-oriented. ' ' 

Dunng his college years he 
was actively involved in 
campus organizations such as 
student senate. Center Board, 
the newspaper and radio. He 
was a member of the local fra- 
ternity. Alpha Sigma Chi 



which now, on campus, is the 
national fraternity Sigma Chi. 

He met his wife Stephanie, a 
1975 graduate of CUP, during 
graduate school. They have 
three children, Hilarie, Adam 
and Alison. Ron's hobbies 
include running, reading and 
drawing, whenever his busy 
schedule allows. 

TTie goals he has for the 
future of the alumni and 
public relations are to better 
market the institution, con- 
tinue to improve the services 
provided oy the Alumni 
House, as well as setting up 
student alumni chapters and 
printing an alumni directory. 

One thing is certain, it is 
nice to know that when stu- 
dents graduate and reach the 
alumni status of CUP 
alumni status of CUP they will 
be kept informed and given 
the option of staying involved 
with Clarion University. The 
responsibility of Alumni and 
Public Relations is in good 
hands with Ron Wilshire. 
Clarion University is 
fortunate to have him aboard, 
he serves them well. 



Movie Review 



How to picl< up Moiiy Ringwaid 



by Cindy Karpaw and Ray Tomczak 
Features Staff Writers 

"Has anyone ever told you 
that you have the face of a 
Botticelli and the body of a 
Degas?" 

Well, Jack Jericho tells that 



to every woman he meets, 
until he meets Randi Jenson. 
Robert Downey and Molly 
Ringwaid portray this unusual 
couple in "Ilie Pick-Up Art- 



ist, a new film from Twen- 
tieth Century Fox. 
TTie movie is all about the 



efforts of Jack, a free-spirited 
elementary gym teacher, who 
involves himself with Randi. 
Randi spends an afternoon 
with Jack, but afterwards re- 
fuses to even give him her 
phone number. However, 
Jack doesn't give up and fol- 



TV-5 has big plans for future 



by Susan Daniels 
Features Staff Writer 



Practically non-existent last 
year, TV-5 is now making up 
for lost time. 

Last semester, only one 
show, "University Maga- 
zine," was aired regularly on 
TV-5. TTiis semester, it boasts 
four shows which will be aired 
once the schedude is set. Al- 
though everything is still in 
the planning stages, many 
fun, mteresting, and informa- 
tional shows have been 
planned. 

"University Magazine," the 
only real show that was aired 
last Spring, will be returning 
this faU. This show is a spin-on 
of Evening Magazine in Pitts- 
burgh. It is comprised of fea- 
ture type stories from the uni- 
versity and the town of Clar- 
ion. Occasionally, stories are 



based on events of universities 
as well. Last year "University 
Magazine" traveled to Pitts- 
bui^, Cook Forest, and even 
Washington, D.C. to do some 
stories and producer Greg 
Loscar hopes to travel again 
this year. He also has tenta- 
tive plans for a contest which 
will give away some sort of 
tour, a contest to give away a 
dream date for 2, a Spring 
fashion show, and possibly 
even "Starstruck 88", a show 
which will search for talent 
much in the same manner as 
"Starsearch". 

Another show \^ch will be 
airing this semester is "Sports 
Center 5", produced by Eric 
Richey and Rich Maurer. 
"Sports C«iter 5" covers both 
high school and university 
sports. An interesting feature 
on the show wiU be a commen- 



tary by "Mr. Sports," who is 
Rick Kapres. Another in- 
teresting segment entitled 
"Meat tiie Golden Eagle" fea- 
tures a Clarion University ath- 
lete who has excelled. Richey 
hopes to eventually cover 
local professional sports in 
Pittsburgh and later even 
Clevelana and Cincinnati. Al- 
though many of the staff 
members have little exper- 
ience, Richey is confident that 
the few technical difficulties 
that were evident in the first 
show will soon subside. 

"Video Review", produced 
by Jeff Nuhfer will now re- 
view four movies available on 
video cassette per episode, 
lliree of these reviews will 
be on popular movies, and the 
fourth review will center on an 
obscure movie, which is a 

(See TV-5... Page 13) ' 



lows her around, eventually 
following her back to the 
apartment she shares with her 
father. Flash (Dennis Hop- 
per). 

Jack's persistence leads to 
complications when he gets 
mixed up with gangsters who 
threaten Randi and Flash. His 
efforts to help them out, while 
stiU trying to convince Randi 
to take him seriously, form 
the basis for the main action 
of the movie. 

MS. KARPAW: I really 
liked the movie. It was very 
interesting and had a good 
plot. But I don't tiiink Molly 
Ringwaid quite fit the part of a 
mature 19-year-old woman. 

MR. TOMCZAK: I think 
Ringwaid was good in her 
part. The character called for 
a detached, controlled per- 
formance and that's what 
Ringwaid delivered. In my 
opinion, she definitely has 
^wn out of the adolescent 
mold of "Pretty in Pink" and 
other earlier movies. 

MS. KARPAW: I disagree. 
NO matter how hard I tried, I 
could not picture her charac- 
ter having sex in the back seat 
of a car with a guy she just 
met. It just wasn't right. 
Maybe it's because she's play- 



ed too many innocent 16-year- 
olds. 

Mr. Tomczak: No matter 
what you thought of Molly 
Ringwald's performance, 
you'll have to agree that 
Robert Downey did an incred- 
ible job as Jerico. His per- 
formance was short of a 
surprise to me since his only 
other previous movie role, as 
the roommate in "Back to 
School", gave no indication 
that he had this kind of poten- 
tial. His character here is 
charming and instantiy lik- 
able. It's one of the best light 
comic performances I've seen 
in a while. 

MS. KARPAW: Definitely. 
He was superb in this movie. 
From the opening scenes to 
the end, I couldn't stop laugh- 
ing. Personally, I had never 
seen Robert Downey in a 
movie before, but his perform- 
ance here was quite impres- 
sive. 

MR. TOMCZAK: The movie 
was a lot of fun, but I enjoyed 
the first half more than the se- 
cond. The first half focused on 
developing Jack's character. 
The best early scenes are of 
him practicing his pick-up 
lines in front of a mirror. But 

(See Movie Review. . .Page 14} 



12-THE CLAT^ION CALL, Clarion, PA, Thursday, Oct. 15, 1987 



Introducing. . . . Caria Young 



I 



by Maria Kapsak 
Features Editor 



Did this woman reaUy grad- 
uate from CUP? Of course she 
did! And her name is Carla 
Young. 

Carla graduated with a 
Bachelor of Science Degree in 
Secondary Education, Com- 
munication Arts, with a con- 
centration in writing and liter- 
ature. But she's not settling 
for a bachelor's degree from 
CUP, Carla is back to acquire 
a master's degree in Reading 
Education. 

While studying for her mas- 
ters, Carla also holds an im- 
portant position in the admis- 
sions office. She is a Minority 
Admissions Counselor — 

Graduate Assistant for Minor- 
ity Recruitment. What does 
this position entitle? "Travel- 
ing and early mornings," ac- 
cording to Carla. She partici- 
pates m statewide recruit- 
ment in which she represents 
Qarion. Several hundred high 
school students attend "col- 
lege days" where many col- 
leges set up tables and talk to 
prospective students. For Car- 
la, this type of work comes 
naturally. She loves to talk to 
students and takes pride in re- 
presenting Clarion. "There is 
a lot of information to know 



about Clarion in order to be ef- ' 
fective in recruiting," said 
Carla. But what goodis infor- 
mation if it isn't communicat- 
ed correctly? That's another 
quality of Carla's. She can 
project to the students the ex- 
cellence of Clarion with her 
words. 

While Carla attended Clar- 
ion she was involved in var- 
ious activities. One of which 
was Delta Sigma Theta soror- 
ity, Inc., a public service sor- 
ority. Although she has grad- 
uated she still remains active, 
in the Pittsburgh Alumnae 
Chapter of Delta Sigma Theta. 
TTie meetings are held once a 
month. There are roughly 150 
members and Carla is one of 
the youngest. The sorority 
performs community service 
activities, a lot like the ones 
here at Clarion. 

The sorority has given Car- 
la a sense of leadership 
throughout coUege but accord- 
ing to Carla, "My parents 
have been the biggest inspira- 
tion in my life." Carla's par- 
ents have always given her 
that incentive to continue her 
education further. They never 
downgraded anything Carla 
brought before them. If it 
wasn t for her parents Carla 
feels she wouldn't be where 
she is today. 



^7 ^" 

^ the 



groove 



by Kevin Beam and Wayne Brosius 
Features Staff Writers 



Oct. 


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NOTES 

—Jazz guitarist GEORGE BENSON has finally graduated. He was recently 
awarded his high school diploma in Pittsburgh after leaving school more 
than 25 years ago. Why did he quit? A teacher once told young GEORGE 
to choose between school and music. . .Need we say which one he chose? 

—GRACE SLICK has spoken out against love! Love songs that is. She 

says she prefers practically any type song other than a love song. She 
did help write a ballad on the new STARSHIP album NO PROTECTION, but 
SLICK says she probably won't write another. While with JEFFERSON 
AIRPLANE, she says she wrote about everything but love. . .No kiddingi 
She once wrote a tune about axe murders I 

—Why is EL DEBARGE behind bars? He failed to keep his word to do 80 
hours of community service in Michigan. He agreed to do the services 
after admitting he had created a disturbance. Trouble is, a broken pro- 
mise in Michigan is worth 15 days in the pen. 

—Old singers never die, they just make guest appearances. At least that's 
what veteran vocalist DUSTY SPRINGFIELD Is doing. She handled the Job 
of lead vocal on RICHARD CARPENTER'S latest release "Something in 
your Eyes," and also belts out the notes for a song on the PET SHOP 
BOYS' new album Actually. If you've forgotten, DUSTY is remembered 
most for "Will You Stilt Love Me Tomorrow," and "Mockingbird," among 
other great hits. 

—The GRATEFUL DEAD aren't worried about home taping hurting their 
Sales of records. In fact, they encourage it! For a fee at DEAD concerts, 
you can set up your own equipment and tape the straw. 




Senior Profile 



THE CLARION CALL, Clflon. PA, Thursday, Oct. 15, 1987—13 



CCLITlpUS Close-up. . . . Johann von Schrenkel 



Important Job Carla hopes to bring many students to CUP. 



Photo by Mike Bordo, Photography Editor 



Ever since Carla was a 
child she wanted to be a 
teacher. She mentioned the 
times when her and her 
friends would play "school." 
The teacher was the most de- 
manding character when 
playing "school." If Carla 
wasn't that person she would 
refuse to play with her friends. 
Up until this day she has hopes 
for the future to be a teacher. 



Some advice that Carla 
gives to students in college is 
"you get out of it what you put 
into it. It's (college) what you 
make of it." Carla feels that 
everyone should enjoy their 
coUege years and not be in a 
hurry to finish. TTie years fly 
by so fast. Even though Carla 
did come back to Clarion for 
her graduate work, she said it 
isn't the same as being an un- 



dergraduate, there are more 
responsibilities. 

As for the future? Carla 
wants to obtain her masters 
degree from CUP and become 
a reading specialist or a 
teacher. She also mentioned 
the possibility of becoming in- 
volved with the adult literacy 
program in Pittsburgh. 
"Maybe even higher educa- 
tion, who knows?" 



CUP goes underwater 



by Crissy Richter, 
Features Staff Writer 



Tliose students who attend- 
ed "Inside the Cousteau So- 
ciety," a lecture presented by 
David Brown, were able to ex- 
perience an underwater world 
of wonder. There are those of 
us, however, who have not a 
clue to what the Cousteau So- 
ciety is all about. 

As Mr. Brown talked of his 
work as a lecturer and explor- 
er, a listener could get a feel- 
ing for the idea behind the 
non-profit organization. Ac- 
cordmg to Mr. Brown, "Tlie 
whole program is designed to 
carry the audience back in 
time, beginning with early in- 
ventions and move to the pres- 
ent." 

Hiis educational organiza- 
tion was put into motion by the 
world known Captain Jacques 
Cousteau. Mr. Brown pointed 
out that "A lot of people, 
roughly to the tune of a quar- 
ter of a million, have heard of 
Jacques Cousteau and have 
joined the Cousteau Society. It 
is a non-profit organization 
that uses education and films 
to reach out to pec^le." 

The Society provides ser- 
vices such as Dolphins Log 
and Calypso Log, which may 



be obtained through a mem- 
bership. "With the money that 
our membership provides, we 
are able to conduct pollution 
surveys," says Brown. Pres- 
ently the team of the Cousteau 
Society is working on a film 
series entitled "Rediscovery 
of the World." Also offered is 
Project Ocean Search. This 
program consists of 35 people 
at a time, for a two-week' 
stretch that takes them to 



such places as the Caribbean 
and the South Pacific. 

"We're taking a different 
philology in our films, ocean 
centers, books that is allowing 
us to reach many many peo- 
ple," is Brown's attitude. 

Persons interested in learn- 
ing more about the Cousteau 
Society may write them at 
8440, Santa Monia Blvd., Los 
Angeles, California 90069. 




The CoustMU Society David Brown shared his thoughts and experience 

with CUP. Photo by Chris Homer, Staff Photographer 




Scottish origin. . . Johann von Schrenkel shows off the latest style from his 
native country, Scotland. Photo by Frani( Lotito, Staff Photographer 



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by Shelley Deeter 
Features Staff Writer 



Why do people choose Qar- 
ion University for their post 
high school education? 
Johann von Schrenkel said, 
"It was totally my dad's 
idea." Sound familiar? 
Johann is a senior Spanish 
major originaUy from Scot- 
land, now residing with his 
father in Johnstown, PA. 

When I first asked Johann 
to do this interview he said, 
"I'm kind of modest could you 
do someone else?" It turns out 
that nothing could be farther 
from the truth — Johann von 
Schrenkel had plenty to say 
about everything. 

Johann was bom in Wash- 
in^n, D.C., but was basically 
raised in Scotland. His family 
consists of his Austrian father, 
Scotish mother, a brother Ste- 
fan, and a sister Sheila. 

The most obvious question 
in my mind was, "Now that 
you are here — what do you 
think of aarion?" WeU, he 
likes it, but said, "Sometimes 
Clarion is so boring that you 
have to study." Either Clarion 
is extremely boring, or Jo- 
hann is extremely exag- 
gerating, because he manages 
to maintain a 3.97 grade aver- 
age. Nice, huh? He says that 
he gets good grades here be- 
cause the schools have a 
broader education. Compared 
to schools at home it is much 
easier to get in. He was turned 
down at a Scottish University 
because he "wasn't smart 
enough." 

Johann says that the broad 
education offered at Clarion is 
a good idea. "At European 
schools, if your major is Span- 
ish you study Spanish. Here 
you get a little science, a little 
history, and a little of every- 
thing. That's good for you." 



movie that didn't do well at 
the box office but did well on 
video. "Video Review" is also 
hoping to do a show which will 
review horror movies in honor 
of Halloween. 



He also thinks that students in 
America have suffered from 
the "hippie generation." He 
says, "Students are a little too 
laid back, and they tend to 
complain too much. If they 
were in Europe, they'd be in a 
panic about school.' 

Here at Clarion Johann 
keeps himself busy with his 
many activities. He is presi- 
dent of the Spanish Club, a 
German tutor, a member of 
Clarion International Associa- 
tion, and a member of Phi Eta 
Sigma, the Freshman Honor- 
ary Society. How does he do 
all of this and still get good 
grades? 

Besides doing well in 
classes and activities, he's 
also multi-talented. Johann 
speaks five languages fluent- 
ly. He speaks English, Ger- 
man, Spanish, a dialect of 
Czechoslovakia, and Gaelic, 
which is ancient Scottish. 
Most of us have enough pro- 
blems with one language. He 
also likes to play soccer, col- 
lect stamp^s, play tennis, and 
keep up with European Auto- 
mobile technology. One of his 
favorite pastimes is playing 
the guitar. A few minutes af- 
ter talking to him, I was for- 
tunate enough to stimible on to 
a "mini-concert" in Campbell 
Hall. He was playing every- 
thing from The Who to U2. His 
favorite groups to play are 
The Who, Simple Minds, Elvis 
Costello, and of course U2. I 
think next time he should sell 
tickets. 

It's hard enough to adjust to 
coUege life when you're only a 
few hours from home. Well Jo- 
hann said that he had a few 
problems, but all in all he's do- 
ing fine. He said he's home- 
sick for his mom, traveling in 
Europe, Scotch Whiskey, and 
the good old Scottish Pute. He 
doesn't miss the weather, 

I V "O- ■ ■ ■(Continued from Page 11) 

Creative director of the 
show Lisa Zagar says that al- 
though a good portion of the 
staff of '^ Video Review" is 
fairly new at what they're 
doing, there is a lot of poten- 



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because it's just like the 
weather here in Qarion — 
weird. He misses the Pubs. 
"Instead of talking about 
women and sports over a few 
beers, we talk about politics, 
and world events that may af- 
fect a small country like us." I 
don't think I heard of a dis- 
cussion like that at the Roost 
or University Inn. He also 
points out that he misses how 
everyone is concerned about 
the state of their country com- 
pared to big powers like the 
United States or U.S.S.R. He 
says, "The United States is a 
great country, but they should 
put more emphasis on educa- 
tion and public welfare 
instead of the national de- 
fense." Maybe he's got some- 
thing. 

About American girls? 
"They're beautiful, but it's a 
shame they don't realize when 
someone really loves them. 
TTiey're also a bit too mater- 
ialistic for me." It's a good 
thing Johann has a girlfriend 
in Argentina who he plans to 
visit when he graduates this 
semester. 

Other plans after gradua- 
tion include studying to be an 
international spy. The next 
James Bond? His broad lin- 
guistic skills are an asset to 
this career decision. "Being a 
spy would be very exciting for 
me. I'd like to work for the 
Great Britain MI-5, which is 
equivilent to the United 
State's C.I.A." 

Johann von Schrenkel will 
succeed at anything he puts 
his mind to. I'm sure he'fl be 
whatever he wants to be, be- 
cause he's so dedicated to his 
education and his view of 
everything is just about right 
on track. Well, Johann talking 
to you sure put a new light on 
things for me — keep it up, 
and you'll do great. 



tialtobuildon. 

The final show which is on 
the tentative schedule at this 
point is "Clarion Today", pro- 
duced by Kristin Iden. "Clar- 
ion Today" is a talk show 
magazine which provides 
interesting information for 
both the campus and com- 
munity of Qarion. Although it 
is a brand new show, you may 
have already seen the seg- 
ments featuring a fashion 
makeover, an interview with 
Saturday Night Live star Nora 
Dunn, a Halloween fashion 
show, and a segment on 
teenage runaways Producer 
Kristin Iden also hopes to fea- 
ture some contests and cook- 
ing segments in the near 
future. 

Tliere is much to see on TV- 
5. The producers will have en- 
tertaining as well as informa- 
tive shows for the Clarion 
community. 



THE CLARION CALL, Clarion, PA, Thursday, Oct. 15, 1987-15 



14-THE CLARION CALL, Clarion, PA, Thursday, Oct. 15, 1987 



ACROSS 

1 Bishopric 
4 A state: abbr. 
6 Roadside hotel 

11 Needed 

13 Peaceful 

15 In the manner of 

16 Food programs 

18 Poker stake 

19 Pounds per 
sq. in. 

21 Metal fastener 

22 Greek letter 

23 Deceive 
26 Possessive 

pronoun 
29 Gratuities 
3 1 Changes color 

of 

33 Exclamation 

34 Hypothetical 
force 

35 Once around 
track 

38 Stitch 



39 Behold! 

40 Hebrew letter 

41 Lamb's pen 
name 

43 Assistant 
45 Algonquian 

Indian 
47 Sham 
50 Exclamation 

52 Region 

53 Pallor 

56 Sea in Asia 

58 Brown, as bread 

60 Agave plant 

61 Calm 

63 Closed securely 

65 Pintail rucks 

66 Spanish article 

67 Female sheep 

DOWN 

1 Trade 

2 Dines 

3 Printer's 
measure 

4 Checks 



The 

Weekly 

Crnsswnrd 

Puzzle 



5 Standard of 
perfection 

6 Loses 

7 Either 

8 Pair of horses 



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9 Boredom 
10 Illuminated 
12 Football score: 

abbr. 
14 Symbol for 

cerium 
17 Bound 
20 Mischievous 

child 

24 Capri, e.g. 

25 River in 
Scotland 

27 Related 

28 Footwear 

29 Covers 

30 Mental image 
32 Graceful bird 

36 High mountain 

37 Buccaneers 
42 Danish island 
44 Mountain on 

Crete 
46 Amulet 

48 Plague 

49 Artist's stand 
51 Toward shelter 

54 Cook slowly 

55 Conceal 

56 Equally 

57 Legal matters 
59 Symbol for 

tantalum 
62 Compass point 
64 French article 




Ravsrtnd Billy C. Wartz. . .will leave you in stitches with his unique style 
combining funky blues piano and outrageous humor. He will be perfornning 
at Riemer Coffeehouse on Friday, Oct. 16, at 8 p.m. 




International jazz great Dizzy Gillespie will be performing in Marwick-Boyd Auditorium on Tuesday, Oct. 20 at 8:15 

p.m. Tickets are $5.00, or free with a valid student I.D. The appearance is sponsored by CUP Center Board. 



Movie... 



after Jack becomes involved 
with Randi's problems with 
the mob, the movie becomes 
more of a caper film, and not 
as fun to watch. 

MS. KARPAW: True, it 
becomes more serious, but 
Jack's constant pursuit of any 
female on two legs did become 
a little monotonous. I was 
happy when he finally settled 
down and concentrated on 



(Continued from Page 11) 

Randi. It allowed us to see 
that he could also act serious- 
ly, not just comically. It also 
help^ develop the character 
a httle more, going from a 
chauvinistic woman-chaser to 
a sensitive, caring gentleman. 
MR. TOMCZAK: I thought 
it was good that Jack findly 
settled down with Randi, es- 
pecially since I thought that 
Ringwald and Downey made a 



Chandler Menu 

THURSDAY, OCT. 15 
LUNCH: Homemade Beef Barley Soup, Split Pea Soup, Cheese Steak Sandwich on Bun, Open- 
face Reul)en Grilled, Bluelake Green Beans, Potato Chips. 

DINNER: Homemade Beef Barley Soup, Split Pea Soup, Veal Cutlet Parmesan, Buttered Fried 
Fish, Baked Lima Beans, Cabbage, Poppy Seed Noodles. 

FRIDAY, OCT. 16 
BREAKFAST: Banana, Fried Eggs, Sunnyside or Over, Hot Oatmeal, English Muffins, Home 
Pried Potatoes, Stewed Prunes, French Toast with syrup. Date Nut Bread. 
LUNCH: Homemade Clam Chowder, French Onion Soup, Foot Long Hot Dog on Bun, Chile Con 
Came, Com Qtips, Sauerkraut. 

DINNER: Homemade Clam Chowder, French Onion Soup, Pizza with Pepperoni, Fish Sandwich 
on Bun, Chicken Nuggets, Plain Cheese Sauce, Cheese/Broccoli Sauce, Baked Potatoes, Bar-B-Q 
Sauce. 

SATURDAY, OCT. 17 
BREAKFAST: Fried Eggs, Sunnyside or Over, Bacon, Coffee Cake, Waffles with Syrup, Cream of 
Wheat, Hash Brown Potatoes. 

LUNCH: Beef Vegetable Soup, French Onion Soup, Hot Roast Beef Sandwich with Gravy, Golden 
Brown Wing Dings, Brown Tater Gems, Buttered Asparagus Pieces: 

DINNER: Beef V^etaUe Soup, French Onion Soup, Baked Smoked Ham, Salisbury Steak, 
Cream Style Cora, Creamed Potatoes, Buttered Cauliflower. 

SUNDAY, OCT. 18 
BRUNCH: C3iilled Grapefruit Half, Scramlried Eggs, Bacon, Hot Oatmeal, Banana, Knockwurst 
and Sauerkraut, Home Fried Potatoes, English Muffm, Desert Peaches, A^ile Frittov with sy- 
rup. Grilled Sausage Patty, Cinnamon Rolls. 

DINNER: Greek Lemon Soup, French Onion Soup, Backed Chicken, Baked Ham Loaf, Buttered 
Frozen Peas and Mushrooms, Mashed Potatoes and Gravy, Wax Beans. 

MONDAY, OCT. 19 
BREAKFAST: Scrambled Eggs, Bacon, Cream of Wheat, Assorted Cdd Cereals, Bagels with 
Cream Cheese, Hash Brown Potatoes, Pancakes with Hot Syrup, Grilled Taylor Pork Roll, Cin- 
namon Roll, Assorted Raised Donuts. 

LUNCH: Homemade Minestrone, Cream of Potato Soup, Hoagie, Baked Tuna Noodle Casserole, 
Potato Chips, Buttered Carrots. 

DINNER: Homemade Minestrone, Cream of Potato Soup, Roast Choice of Top Round Au Jus, 
Sirimp Newl)urg over Rice, Buttered Frozen Mixed Vegetables, Oven Browned Potatoes, Cream- 
ed (^(uu. 

TUESDAY, OCT. 20 
BREAKFAST: Grapefruit, Fried Eggs, Apple Coffee Cake, Hwne Fried Potatoes, Cinnamon 
Rolls, Fruit Cocktail, French Toast with Hot Syrup, Hot Oatmeal. 

LUNCH: Homemade Chicken Com Soup, Vegetable Soup, Grilled Hamburger on a Roll with 
sliced Tomatoes, Onions and Lettuce, Fried Fish Sandwich, Shoestring Potatoes, White Shoepeg 
Com. 

DINNER: Hcmiemade Chicken Com Soup, Vegetable Soup, Baked Haddock, Baked Lasagna, But- 
ter Green Beans, Yellow Rice Harvard Beets. 

WEDNESDAY, OCT. 21 
BREAKFAST: Cheese Omelette, Bacon Slices, Hash Brown Potatoes, Hard Boiled Eggs, Cin- 
namon Rolls, Hot Cakes with Syrup, Fried Country Scrapfde, Bagels with Cream Cheese. 
LUNCH : Cream of Broccdi Soup, Tomato Soup, Ham Bar-B-Q on Bun, Toasted Cheese Sandwich, 
Cheese Curls, French Fried CauUflowo-. 

DINNER: Cream of Broccoli Soup, Tcnnato Soup, Grilled Pwk Chop, Braised Steak and Peppen, 
H(M CirmamoQ Aii^esauce, Buttovd Rice, Sauteed Cabbage with Bacon. 

THURSDAY, OCT. 22 
BREAKFAST: Fresh Banana Sections, Fried E^, Cream of Wheat, AssiHted Cold Cereals. 
Hnne Fried Potatoes, Banana Bread, Chilled Grapefruit, Hot Waffles with Synqi, Cinnamon 
Rolls. 



fantastic pair. At the end of 
the movie when they looked at 
each other, you could sense 
that these two people really 
had something going, that 
they truly enjoyed being to- 
gether. But, I don't think the 
second half of the movie show- 
cased this relationship enough 
or the unique characters and 
talents of these two actors. 

MS. KARPAW: WeU, like I 
said before, I just wasn't too 
thrilled with Molly Ringwald's 
performance. But I would still 
recommend seeing this 
movie. It was very entertain- 
ing and humorous yet it still 
had an interesting message 
for the youth of today. Even 
with all the free non-conmiit- 
tal relationships going on 
today, the traditional long- 
lasting love always shines 
throu^. 

MR. TOMCZAK: This is a 
very good movie, and I, also, 
would recommend that you 
see "The Pick-Up Artist." It's 
a great romantic comedy, 
with fine performances by 
Downey and Ringwald. I think 
this movie should make a 
major star out of Robert 
Downey. 

PUZZLE SOLi^lON 



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SPORTS... 




Reflections 
on Past 

by David Mahaffey 

Sports Editor 

This is my eighth semester of 
covering sports at Clarion Uni- 
versity and as I reflect over the 
experience that I have gained 
both professionally and personal- 
ly, I feel all this time, work and 
effort have been worth it. 

In my four years at Clarion the 
athletics program has had many 
good days and a few bad ones. 
But through everything there has 
always been one Golden Eagle 
tradition which I will remember 
— the pride and involvement 
which each athlete, coach, fac- 
ulty member and student has 
shown in the athletic program. 

Since I became involved in 
writing sports for the Call and 
covering sports functions for 
other media on campus I have 
had the opportunity to see some 
of the best athletes to ever come 
through Clarion and also got to 
know some of the over achievers 
who didn't have a starring role, 
but without whom the successful 
programs could not exist. 

Not many students are left on 
campus who can remember the 
days when Elton Brown ran the 
football for the Golden Eagles or 
the days when Ciccarello was 
working his incredible magic on 
the wrestling mat. The names on 
the minds now are Doug Em- 
minger, Dori Mamalo and Mike 
Cole. These are the athletes who 
are making the headlines in Clar- 
ion sports as of late. 

This year's freshmen will 
never get to see the brute force 
that Ken Edwards exhibited 
while destroying opposing of- 
fenders or the smooth, flexible 
moves of Paul Clark as he 
worked toward a pin. To you stu- 
dents and sports fans I can only 
say you missed some of the most 
exciting athletes to ever walk the 
paths of CUP. 

I had the honor of being around 
and knowing such athletes as Bob 
Green, Loyal Jasper and Nate 
Carter. I was covering football 
when John and Jerry Haslett 
were roaming the Golden Eagle 
defense on their seek and destroy 
mission. 

The athletes aren't the only 
part of Qarion athletics that 
make the programs so success- 
ful. TTiere are the coaches who 
put in endl^s hours of work and 
etfoFt to come up with just the 
right combination of players or 
strategies to come out on top. I 
feel lucky to have been able to 
cover these people and their 
teams. 

(See Run. ..Page 19) 



Eagles Fall to I.U.P. 



by Rick Kapres 
Sports Staff Writer 



On the opening drive of the 
game, Saturday, Indiana 
marched 78 yards on 10 plays 
to score on a four yard pass 
from quarterback Jim Peha- 
nick to wide receiver Tony 
Trave. The score gave lUP a 
6^ lead, a lead which they 
would retain through the re- 
mainder of the contest, as 
they went on to an impressive 
24-12 Pennsylvania State Ath- 
letic Conference win. 

Tlirough three Quarters of 
play the Golden Eagles re- 
mained scoreless due to an of- 
fensive performance that 
lacked any of the fire-power 
seen in the previous three 
games. Injured quarterback 
Doug Enuninger started the 
game for Clarion, but, for 
most of the contest, displayed 
little of the skills that have 
made him rated number one 
in total offense in the PSAC 
West. Emminger completed 
just 15 of 37 for 161 yards and 2 
interceptions against lUP. 

Finally in the fourth quarter 
Qarion's offense began to get 
on track, as they scored twice, 
but it would not be enough. 

Conversely, lUP's offense 
unveiled a well balanced at- 
tack, mixing in 86 yards by 
fullback Steve Girting, with 
265 yards passing by Peha- 
nick. 

After scoring on the opening 
drive, lUP was held to just 3 
points the remainder of the 
first half. Those points came 
on a 19-yard field goal by kick- 
er John Sanstrom. The lack of 
Indian scoring can be attribut- 
ed to the Golden Eagle 
defense, who consistently 
thwarted Indian scoring 
opportunities throughout the 

With the offense unable to 
move and kicker Phil Buja- 
kowski punting into a stiff 
wind, lUP continued to gain 
excellent field position for 
much of the second quarter, 
but the defense stood tall on 
two occasions. On tlie first in- 
stance Golden Eagle defen- 
sive back John Besic came up 
big, as he intercepted Pe- 
h^ck in the endzone. Then at 
the «id of the half lUP drove 
to the CUP one-yard line 
before an illegal procedure 
penalty gave them a first and 
goal at the 6. Once again the 
Golden Eagle defense stiffen- 
ed as Clarion's fi-ee safety Bob 
Kelly dropped lUP's Kevin 
Bache short of the ^>al line, 
and fellow D-back James 



Rachel broke up a pass on 
third down. 

Despite the stem defensive 
play, the offense managed 
only 89 first half yards and 
Clarion trailed W). 

The third quarter was much 
the same as the second, as the 
defense continued to have 
their backs to the wall, until 
they finally gave in. Pehanick 
drove lUP 51 yards on nine 
plays before giving to Girting 
who slashed in from the five 
for the score. A pass for two 
from Pehanick to tight end 
Paul KoveU made the score 
17-0. 

Twice more the Clarion of- 
fense could not pick up a first 
down and was forced to punt 
deep in their own end, and on 
their second chance in Clar- 
ion territory, lUP made good. 
Girting, a 6-3, 222-pounder 
power^ in again this time 
from the 6 to make it 24-0. 

Following the score Clar- 
ion's offense finally put to- 
gether a drive marching 79 
yards in 13 plays ending in a 
one-yard run by fuUback Mick 



Kehoe. The drive mixed the 
run and the pass very weU, but 
took 6:07 to complete, leaving 
Clarion just 12 minutes to 
overcome the 24-6 deficit. 

Tlie score did lift the Clarion 
spirits, however, and on lUP's 
next possession the defense 
dropped the Indians back 20 
yards. The big loss, on a sack 
of 14 yards bv Golden Eagle 
defensive tackle Lou Weiers. 
Weiers had another excellent 
outing collecting 11 total 
tackles. 

When Emminger got the 
ball back he hit tight end Dan 
Hastings for 22 yards to the 
lUP 2 yard line. Two plays 
later Enuninger kept it him- 
self and dove over from the 2, 
after a missed 2-point try the 
score stood at 24-12. 

Unfortunately for Clarion 
that would be the end of their 
scoring. They would get the 
ball back only twice more, and 
Emminger was picked off bv 
Indiana comer Darren Cotrill 
before giving way to backup 
QB Mike Carter, whose only 
pass was also mtercepted, this 



time by lUP's Jim Hostler. 

The loss was a tough one, 
for it dropped Clarion behind 
lUP in the PSAC West stand- 
ings. Clarion now stands at 2-1 
and 3-2 overall. lUP leads the 
conference at 2-0 and 4-1 on 
the year. 

Indiana's Jim Pehanick was 
named PSAC West "player of 
the week" as he went 22-39 for 
265 yards and two touch- 
downs. 

Clarion's standout was line- 
backer Ken Raabe. The senior 
all conference player showed 
Ail-American potential as he 
registered 20 tackles, 13 of 
which were solos, and four 
tackles for losses including a 
sack. 

Next week Clarion must 
look to improve upon a run- 
ning game that gained only 39 
net yards on 30 attempts. Tliey 
will host Edinboro at Memor- 
ial Stadium on Saturday. "Die 
Fighting Scots enter the game 
0-2 in the conference, with 
losses to Slippery Rock and 
Indiana. 




In the Air. . . .Clarion quarterback Doug Emminger gets hit right after releasing the football in the direction of Golden 
Eagle receiver Jerry Starr. Photo by David Mahaffey, Sports Editor 



PSAC 



Races take Shape 



The Pennsylvania State 
Athletic Conference (PSAC) is 
heading into its fourth week- 
end of divisional games as the 
Western and Eastern Division 
races begin to take shape. In 
all, 3 divisional games will be 
played in both divisions this 
Saturday, with one interdivi- 



sional contest also dotting the 
calendar. 

In the Western Division, 
both Indiana and Shippens- 
burg will be putting their un- 
defeated records on the line. 
INDIANA (2-0) , will be travel- 
ling to LOCK HAVEN (0-3), 
wlSe SLIPPERY ROCK (2-1) 



heads to SHIPPENSBURG (2- 
0) to battle the Red Raiders. 
Also in the West, Qarion (2-1) 
will be at home against EDIN- 
BORO (0-2). 

Hie Eastern Division is also 
taking shape, with two unde- 
feated teams also in action 

(See Races Page 17) 



16-THE CUARION CALL, Clarion, PA, Thursday, Oct. 15, 1987 



CUP Volleyball 



Play in Connecticut Tournament 



by Susan Kurtz, 
Sports Staff Writer 



The Clarion women's vol- 
leyball team traveled to 
Southern Connecticut State 
University for a tournament 
in which they fmished 4-1, and 
in third place. 

The first team Clarion met 
was Pace University whom 
the Lady Eagles defeated IS- 
IS, 15-10. Barb Buck and Car- 
rie Hawley led with nine kills 
each. Tammy Wolfe followed 
close behind with seven kills. 

Coach Cindy Opalski feels 
that this proves what a 
balanced scoring attack this 
year's team has. 

"When you have hitters 
with stats that close, you are 
able to continue tough offense 
even if you lose a key hitter," 



said Opalski. 

"This is ideally what I 
wanted from this team. It is 
not an individualized effort by 
one person, but rather a team 
effort. To be a legitimate 
Pennsylvania State Athletic 
Conference (PSAC) threat, 
you have to have six players 
on the court who can hit," said 
Opalski. 

TTie next match was against 
Sacred Heart University. The 
Lady Eagles won this match 
in two games 15-9, 15-13. 

Buck again led the match 
with nine kills, foUowed by 
Jodi Pezek with seven. Diane 
Guenther came out in this 
game and pulled through with 
excellent defensive play. 

"Diane is like the unsung 
hero. She is a person who puts 



RED STALLION 

BECAUSE YOU EARNED IT! 
SAT., OCT. 17 

Golden Eagles Celebration! jy 
by Melster Brau ^ 

'Special T-Shirts 'Special Hats & More 
Dance to Magic Music 

Very Very Special Price! 



a tot of work into setting up the 
offensive play. If she dia not 
pass well, the setter and 
hitters would not be able to 
adiieve the plays," said the 
Clarion mentor. 

The next match against 
Eastern Connecticut State and 
was the first loss of the tour- 
nament for the Lad^ Eagles. 
ECS is ranked 13th in the na- 
tion in Division III volleyball. 

"We played this game early 
in the morning and the girls 
were not emotionally ready to 
face this team," said Opalski. 

"We knew this would be our 
toughest match in the tour- 
nament. The girls just didn't 
play aggressively," comment- 
ed Opalski. 

Tlie Lady Spikers lost 11-15, 
6-15 with Buck leading in kills 
with nine, followed by Hawley 
with seven. 

Qarion then played the con- 
solation game against the Uni- 
versity of Bridgeport. The 
Lady Eagles won easily 15-6, 
15-1. 

"Carrie Hawley had the 
strongest performance thus 
far in her career at Clarion. 
She played very aggressive 
and placed the ball in the open 
spots across the net," said 
Opalski. 

Tlie women then advanced 



Call-Ins 
Welcome 



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99 



DOWNSTAIRS RIEMER 
226-2406 



to the consolation champion- tween just putting the ball 

ship match where they met away and always hitting con- 

and defeated Pace University sistently, ' ' said Opalski. 

again, 15-12, 15-11. St. Francis and Indiana 

Buck led this match with 12 then played one another with 

kills. Pezek followed close Indiana the victor. 

withUkiUs. Clarion then played St. 

Overall Opalski feels the Francis for the fiiMl match of 

girls played^ well at times, the evening, winning in two 

"We need to eliminate the games 15-2, 15-10. 

mental errors. Tlie girls were Pezek led this match with 

frustrated because they knew eight kills and Buck had six 

they were the best team there, kills. Missy O'Rourke had 47 

Easta-n did not beat us, we sets with only two errors 

lost to them, ' * said Opalski. throughout the entire match. 

Iliis past Monday Indiana "We started out this match 
University and St. Francis very aggressively. It is some- 
College met at Qarion for a times hard to play a match, sit 
tri-match. a match, then play another 

Tine first match against In- with momentum. The girls 

diana produced a win for played very aggressive and 

Clarion, 16-14, 15-5. were in the game emotional- 

"We came out slow in the ly," said Opalski. 
first game making foolish "Diane also played another 
menta? mistakes. At one point excellent aggressive defen- 
in this game we were down by sive game. Her passes were 
six points, but we came out right on to Missy, ^' said Opal- 
fighting. Diane Guenther ski. 
came into this game to give us "Overall," Opalski said, "I 
some key serves that turned feel we are starting to go 
the emotional aspect of this through our ^cond phase of 
game around for us," com- improvement." 
mented Opalski. 

Jodi Pezek played one of her "Tlie stats are indicating 

bestgamesof the season. She the best game percentages 

is a very smart court player, ever. The next two weeks are 

according to C^)alski. crucial in showing our im- 

P€a^ had 11 kills, followed provements. We meet Edin- 

by Buck with seven. Both girls boro on Monday, who is our 

only had one error hitting. top challenger for the PSAC 

"There is a difference be- West title," said Opalski. 

CUP Intr amurals 

by Frank Ashton ovor the Legion of Doom. TTiis 

Sports staff Writer gives the Revenge three wins, 

Once again, footbaU is the J^^st of any team in the 

««ur ^^/.^ f« f wc I«^ nf in league. And the finale put one 

^^LiS^k in ffie win column for Nuts and 

ISI^^Vh fh« n.ich fnr fhp Bolts as they beat Donger's 

pft^^eta^e^c^^ ^^^l^ '^'^ -^ 

^oS^^iSSy, Oct. 1, the sTts^a^n^Z^k!^ 

Fighting Tuna defeated Nuts ^^„ J^"*"^'' ''' "'*^'- '= ^ , . 

and BcJts and Bonecrushers S;r^.«h«^4. 200 

rWAfltpHthpRprlmm Bonecrushers-H 2 00 

o^teamenramen. warheacis-t-+ 200 

On Sunday there was a full Redmen+ 1 1 

day of games beginning with a crush+ ........."............010 

victory for the Lqgion of Doom Buffalo Chips+ 3 

over Blood. In other action, south 

TKE's defeated Steve McAn- Fiyboys++ 200 

inch's team and Dominick's Dominick's Revenge 310 

Revenge beat the Crows. TTie LegionofDoom 1 1 

rest of the games on Sunday Blood + 1 20 

included a defeat to Ron Or- SigmaChiH-+« 010 

ange's team by Bamboo II, A 22^+ ^20 

victoiy for Uncle Andy's Mil- 1^^^ ,,, 

hona^esoverDongersIhsas- Bambooii++ 200 

t»S II and, at the end of the Ron oranges Team 1 2 

day Blood defeated Si^ma Chi sigmaChiin-+* 1 

I to pick up its first wm of the Steve McAnlnchs team+* .... 2 

season. east 

And finally, on Monday old Miu Pounders-H + 100 

th&ce were three games. In Uncle Andy's Millionaires-h+.l 00 

game number one the Bone- PhiSigs+ 1 00 

crushers defeated Buffalo Fighting Tuna-i- 110 

Oiips to stay unctefeated and NutsandBoits ......1 2 

hand the Chips thdr third loss pongw s Disasters 11+ +-....0 20 

to no wins. Game two gave a " „irIr,^„Hm« 

victory to Dominick's R?venge ''■imesipendm 



Golden Eagles at home 
to host Edinboro 



THE CLARION CALL, Clarion, PA, Thursday, Oct. 15, 1987-17 
KaCeSa ■ > ■(Continued from Page 15) 



Clarion University's 1967 is off to a good season thus far, 

football team, coming off a 24- averaging 60.6 yards rushing 

12 loss at Indiana last Satur- per contest, which has him 4tn 

day, will be looking to get m the PSAC-West. Sean has 

back on the winning track this gained 903 yards on 80 at- 

Saturday as the Golden tempts with 2 td's. Dworek, 

Eagles host Edinboro. Game meanwhile, has 80 yards and 2 

time at Clarion's Memorial td's in his freshman season, 

Stadium will be at 1 p.m. with Powell gaining 67 yards 

The Golden Eagles enter the and scoring 1 td and Kehoe 

contest with a 3-2 overall rec- with 30 yards and 1 td. 

ord and a 2-1 slate in the The Clarion offense is 

PSAC-Westem Division. Head leading the PSAC-Westem Di- 

Coach Gene Sobolewski's vision averaging 320 yards of 

team lost the season opener total offense per game. Tlie 

against Fairmont State E^^es are getting 95.6 rush- 

(14-8), came back to win three ing, but lead the division in 

strai^t games versus Ferris passing yardage with 224.4. 



to see time are John Geor- 
dana (19 yards, 1 td) and 
Chris Conway (93 yards, 1 td) . 
The offense also has freshman 
placekicker Darren Weber. 
Although he is 3 of 7 in field 



this Saturday. WEST CHES- 
TER (2-0) will visit EAST 
STROUDSBURG (0-3) in one 
contest, while surprising 
MANSFIELD (2-0) will enter- 
tain BLOOMSBURG (2-1). 
Also in the East, KUTZTOWN 
(1-1) will travel to CHEYNEY 
(0-3). 

In the lone inter-divisional 
game, MILLERSVILLE will 



Sd52-y^^ mt the road westward to Visit 

Clarion's strong team de- 
fense will get a severe test 



against the diversified Edin- 
boro offense this Saturday. 
Overall, Clarion's defense is 
:3rd in total defense in the 
West, 2nd in the West against 
the run. Up front the Golden 



CALIFORNIA. 

Last Saturday's PSAC 
Players of the Week were 
lUP's Jim Pehanick in the 
Western Division and Ter- 
rence Burton of Mansfield in 
the East. 

Pehanick, a 6-0, 200-pound, 
quarterback 



State (34-13), California (17- 
14), and Slippery Rock (31-25), 
before dropping last week- 
end's tilt at lUP (24-12) . 

The Fighting Scots are com- 
ing into Saturday's contest 
with a 2-4 overall record and 
an 0-2 slate in the PSAC-West. 
Head Coach Steve Szabo, in 
his third year with the Scots, 
has seen his team lose its 
opener at Liberty University 
(13-8), defeat Mansfield (21- 
10), and Ontral Connecticut 
(14-7), but lose its first two 
conference games at Slippery 
Rock (36-35) and against lUP 
(28-17). Last Saturday the 
CJlan hosted 5th rated West 
Chester and suffered its third 
consecutive defeat (49-28). 

"I think the big thing about 
Edinboro is that they sure can 
score points and have a lot of 
weapons to do just that," of- 
fered Sobolewski. "Edinboro 
has a very complicated sys- 
tem offensively and we will 
have our work cut out for us if 
we are going to hold their of- 
fense in check. I think, as in 
the past with Edinboro, this 
game will prove to be a very 
exciting one for the fans." 

Although playing with two 
knee braces a week ago, Doug 
Enmiinger is once again ex- 
pected to lead the Clarion of- 
fense this Saturday. The sen- 
ior, signal-caller has complet- 
ed 62 of 118 passes for 918 
yards and 5 td's this season. 
Emminger leads the PSAC in 
total offense. 

Enmiinger's favorite tar- 
gets this year have been Ron 
Urbansky, Dan Hastings and 
Mike Brestensky. Urbansky, 
who now leads the PSAC in re- 
ceiving, has 26 catches for 401 
vards and 2 td's. Joining Ur- 
bansky at the other wideout 
post is Brestensky, who has 
latched onto 14 aerials for 190 



Eklimwro's dirfense will cer- 
tainly be tested on Saturday. 
Considered a young but talent 



RflffliH; hflvp h«*n IPd hv fhP junior, quarterback from 

SvrftecWeSweiere^d M*^°^' P^' ^^ ^^ "«^ 

piay ot tacKie U)u weiers ana ^^^^^ inHianc fn a 9a.i9 u/in 

noseguard Mark Jones. Wei- 



ers, a 3rd team AP All-Amer- 
ican last year, has posted 40 



rated Indians to a 24-12 wm 
over Clarion. Pehanick 
clicked on 22 of 39 aerials for 



'265 yards and 1 td to win his 
honor. 

Burton, a 5-11, 256-pound, 
senior, noseguard from 
Browns Mills, N.J., led Mans- 
field to a stunning 13-3 win 
over 8th rated Millersville. 
Burton registered 14 tackles 
including one for a loss, plus 
had a key interception in the 
fourth quarter to lead the 
Mountaineers to victory. On 
the interception. Burton 
tipped a Millersville pass and 
intercepted it at the 4-yard 
line, then ran the pigskin into 
the endzone for an important 
td that gave Mansfield its 13-3 
bulge in the fourth quarter. 
That play also earned the 
PSAC's "Play of the Week" 
honors. 

(Story courtesy of Rich Herman, 
PSAC and CUP-SID) 



ed unit, the Scots are led by tackles and 4 qb sacks despite r 

linphflplrprs .^/viff Rmum aru\ miccincr fho rtrtonen' urifh a Hie. S 



linebackers Scott Brown and 
Al Donahue. Brown leads the 
Scots with 72 stops and 3 brok- 
en-up passes, while Donahue, 
only a freshman, has posted 60 
hits, 4 broken-up passes and 2 
intercepts. Up front, the Scots 
have received steady play 
from tackles Mark Jozefov (34 
tackles, 1 sack), and end Rob 
Lewis (28 tackles, 1 sack) . The 
Edinboro secondary is paced 
by free safety Mike Wether- 
hold (63 tackles, 1 intercept), 
comerback Scott Anderson 
(33 stops, 5 broken-up passes, 
2 intercepts) and strong safety 
Steve Franklin (35 hits, 2 in- 
tercepts). Another big weapon 
is the punting of Mike Ray- 
nard, who leads the entire 
PSAC with an average of 42.0. 
The defense has striked re- 
cently after a good start in 
1987. The defense is allowing 
23.8 points per game, includ- 
ing 374.3 yards of total offense 
per game. A balanced attack, 
the Clan is getting 144.0 yards 
rushing per game along with 
169.0 passing. 

The offense is directed by 
talented sophomore quarter- 
back Jim Ross. Ross has con- 
nected on 90 of 156 passes 
(58%) for 1,014 yards and 6 
td's. The passing has been 
spread out this season, with 
running back Floyd Faulkner 
(13 catches, 101 yards) and re- 
ceivers Daryl Cameron (14 re- 
ceptions, 253 yards, 1 td), 
Qeveland Pratt (14 grabs, 138 
yards) and John Toomer (8 
catches, 145 yards, 3 td's) all 
being effective. 

The running game started 
the year with both Floyd 
Faulkner and Elbert Cble in 
the same backfield. The 



missing the opener with a dis 
located elbow. Jones, only a 
freshman, has 37 stops and 2 
sacks. Joining the duo up front 
are tackles Mark Kelly (17 
tackles), Tim Shook (20 stops, 
3 sacks) and Jeff Clutter (12 
hits). 

(Story courtesy Sports Information.) 




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289yards. 

uarion's running game has 
sputtered from time to time in 
1967, but will look to tailbacks 
Sean Morrissey and Ken Dwo- 
rek, along with fullbacks Mick 



in the first four games, while 
Cole has been in all 6 contests 
for 382 yards on 82 carries 
while scoring 6 td's. Faulkner, 
however has missed the last 
two games with an achilles in- 



Kehoe and Keith Powell to get jury and is questionable for 
the pigskin moving. Morrissey Saturday's tilt. Also expected 



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18-THE CLARION CALL, Clarion, PA, Thursday, Oct. 15, 1987 



From th e Che ap Seats 



by Robert DiDomenico 
Sports Staff Writer 



Let's tab 1987 as the year that 
nobody wanted the Heisman Tro- 
phy. After all, the returning fav- 
orites for College Football's 
greatest prize have been truely 
disappointing. The trend started 
early as Florida QB Kerwin Bell 
was stuffed against Miami. The 
latest hopeful to fold is Notre 
Dame flanker Tim Brown. Brown 
dropped numerous passes and 
had a poor kick returning day 
against Pitt. 

In addition to Brown and Bell, 
Alabama RB Bobby Humphries 
and UCLA TB Gaston Green have 
been battling injuries. Michigan 
St.'s Lorenzo White has been 
bumbling, Michigan's Jamie 
Morris has been fumbling, while 
Penn St.'s Blair Thomas, Pitt's 
Ironhead Heyward and 
Oklahoma St.'s Thurman 
Thomas lacked the important 
pre-season Heisman Hype. Holy 
Cross's Gordie Lockbaum has 
been doing a little of everything 
but a lot of nothing. Just the fact 
that he plays division I-AA rules 
him out. 

The Heisman is supposed to go 
to College Football's best player. 
Though only ignoramouses and 
idiots are naive enough to adhere 
to that notion, the best player in 
Ohio St. LB Chris Spielman. 
Though the USA Today lists 
Spielman on its Heisman watch, 
the New York Touchdown Club 
gives the award and it isn't going 
to a defensive player. 

Although Brown is the most ex- 
citing player in the NCAA, his 15 
receptions in five games isn't im- 
pressive, his kickoff return aver- 
age has fallen below a mediocore 
20 yards and he had a poor nation- 
ally televised performance 
against Pitt. He just hasn't had 
the year he had last year when he 
might have deserved the trophy. 

Oklahome QB Jameele HoUie- 
way has been the most dominant 
player. The super-quick junior 
has put a ton of points on the 
board and his team is no. 1. 
However, the Heisman doesn't 
usually go to an option QB run- 
ner. The Sooners division Il-ish 
schedule doesn't help him either. 
This brings us back to square 
one. 

So who should win the Heis- 
man. I have no opinion yet, but if 
one of the aforementioned play- 
ers doesn't step forward, they 
shouldn't give the award to any- 
one. Here are the predictions: 



NFL STRIKE— It won't end 
with a bang but with a whimper 
as veterans will continue to cross 
the pickett lines week-by-week 
until Gene Upshaw will have no 
leverage against the owners and 
his Travelling Vaudeville Act will 
have played its last hurrah. 

PENN STATE over SYRACUSE 
The Preeminent One would love 
to see otherwise, but the Nittany 
Lions are beginning to jell and 
the Orange's 5-0 record has been 
against nobody that impressive. 

WASHINGTON over USC With 
QB Chris Chandler back from in- 
jury, the Huskies looked more 
like the team was ranked in the 
top 10 by preseason pollsters in 
a big win over Arizona St. 

INDIANA over MINNESOTA 
What the hell' I'U go with the 
Hoosiers again this week in the 
battle of the surprise big 10 
leaders. The Gophers gave up 33 
pts. to lowly Northwestern, so QB 
Dave Schnell and co. should get 
that many easily. 

UCLA over OREGON The 
ducks can't duplicate last weeks 
upset. The Bruins, led by QB 
Troy Aikman, seem hot after 
their opening day loss to 
Nebraska. 

NEBRASKA over OKLAHOMA 
ST. The Cowboys are tough and 
this would be a fun upset pick, but 
the Huskers seem down to 
business. 

ALABAMA over TENNESSEE 
Bear Bryant must've rolled in his 
grave and Coach Bill Curry must 
have bellowed till his voice died 
during last weeks 

embarrassment at Memphis St. 
The Tide should bounce back. 

LSU over KENTUCKY The 
Tigers showed their character 
and resiliency by pulling out the 
comeback win at Georgia. The 
SEC championship seems in their 
grasp if they don't fumble it. 

MICHIGAN over IOWA Hawk- 
eye Coach Harden Fry's "fickle 
female" indecisiveness (he's 
started 4 QB's in six games) has 
hampered a once-promising sea- 
son. The lethargic Wolverine 
should still prevail. 

OHIO ST over PURDUE The 
Buckeyes were burned last week 
due to their lack of offense but 
their great defense should be 
enough to beat Purdue. 

BAYLOR over TEXAS A&M I 
picked this game as if someone 
cares about the Southwestern 
Conference. But hey, we could be 
seeing Baylor on New Year's Day 
against a top contender in the 
Cotton Bowl. 



Tennis team 
to defend 
PS AC title 



by Ron Bollinger, 
Sports Staff Writer 



It's time for the showdown 
that the Lady Golden Eagle 
Tennis Team has been waiting 
for, the PSAC tennis cham- 
pionships at the Hershey Rac- 
quet uub. The matches will 
be plaved all day Friday and 
Saturday. 

The Clarion Lady Eagles 
tennis team are currently 
Pennsylvania defending state 
champions, with the top three 
starters as reigning cham- 
pions. They are No. 1 Lisa 
Warren, No. 2 Susie Fritz, and 
No. 3 Amanda Bell. Rounding 
out the Lady Eagle roster for 
the state championships are. 
No. 4, Tammy Meyers, No. 5, 
Carolyn Vallecorsa, and No. 6, 
Jane Bender. Defending the 
title for Clarion in doubles 
matches are. No. 1, L. Warren 
and S. Fritz, No. 2, T. Meyers 
and L. Kohn, and No. 3, D. 
McAdams and A. Bell. 

"So far the rain has been the 
toughest opponent for the 
ladies to face," said Coach 
Baschnagel. Despite the 
weather the Lady Eagle 
tennis team continued their 
domination on the courts beat- 
ing Youngstown State by a 
score of 9-0. This boosts their 
point total to 77-0, and raises 
their overall season record to 

With the team scheduled for 
two more matches this week 
before the championships, 
Coach Baschnagel is looking 
for a strong finish, and for the 
team to peak at the State 
Championships. Winning the 
Golden Eaglette award for the 
Youngstown match was Car- 
olyn VaUecorsa in singles and 
Lori Kohn and Tammy Mey- 
ers in doubles play. 

Coach Baschnagel said, 
"The doubles teams have 
really improved in the last 
week, and especially against 
Youngstown. 

Looking ahead to the cham- 
pionships, the team is in good 
health and spirits, and is look- 
ing strong to continue their 
winning sbreak of excellence. 





Championship Fonn No. 5 singles player Carolyn Vallecorsa will be help- 
ing the lady tennis team defend their 1986 PSAC title. Photo by Mike Bordo, 

Photography Editor 




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CUP Hun Judo 



THE CLARION CALL, Clarion, PA, Thursday, Oct. 15, 1987—19 



The CUP Hun Judo and 
Self-defense Program this 
semester started off by the 
team sending seven mem- 
bers to the South Hill Judo 
School of Pittsburgh to at- 
tend a Judo Classic on Tues- 
day, Sept. 29, which was con- 
ducted by the 7th degree 
blackbelt holder Phil Porter - 
the head coach and founder 
of National Judo Inst, at Col- 
orado Springs, Col. 

Porter leaned on his 36 
years of judo experience and 
demonstrated some of the 65 
approved judo throwing tech- 
niques of the Japanese Ko- 
dokan Judo and their appli- 
cation in dynamic competi- 
tion. 

CUP coach Dr. Andor P- 
Jobb (3rd degree blackbelt) 
accompanied the seven 



Clarion Judoists and brought 
back a two hour video tape 
produced by the N.J.I, based 
on Porter's demonstrations 
of Judo techniques. 

Thirty students participat- 
ed from Western PA in the 
clinic and earnestly asked 
questions relating to best 
judo practices, conquering 
fear, achieving speed and 
accuracy in the flow of judo 
moves. 

Sport and collegiate judo 
was started by Dr. P-Jobb on 
the Clarion campus 24 years 
ago and is still going strong 
with the support of the Con- 
tinuing Education Program 
and with the cooperation of 
the Athletic Department of 
C.U.P. Trainings are held ev- 
ery Tuesday and Thursday 
from 6: 30 to 8 p.m. 



Students are welcome to 
the sport of self-defense. 
"Our students train hard, 
compete successfully locally, 
regionally, and nationally ev- 
ery year," says coach P- 
Jobb, who is also an execu- 
tive officer in the PA Judo 
Inc., Eastern College Judo 
Association, and the National 
Collegiate Judo Association. 

"Many of the students earn 
belt ranks each semester as 
thev pass qualification tests 
and become life members of 
national judo organizations," 
said coach P-Jobb. 

Jeff Gurecka and Coach P- 
Jobb went to New Castle's 
YMCA Open Tournament. 
Jeff has a green belt and 
placed third in middle- 
weight. Coach P-Jobb took 
part in the tournament as a 
referee. 



Harriers run at Grove City 



by David Mahaffey 
Sports Editor 



The Clarion University's 
men's cross country team 
experienced a new feeling last 
weekend as they lost their first 
dual meet of the year. The 
Golden Eagles ran a triple 
dual meet against Grove City, 
Allegheny and Thiol, beating 
only the later. 

According to Clarion Coach 
Bill English, the Golden 
Eagles got outstanding per- 
formances from their two top 
runners. At the tri-dual, Ed 
Kinch and Tony Neibar finish- 
ed second and third respec- 
tively behind John Hunne of 
Grove City. 

The two losses dropped the 
male harriers to 4-2 on the 
season in dual meets and they 
are 19-3 in invitational runs. 

The basic reason for the 
losses was a mixture of things 
stated English. "AD the past 
victories this year have re- 



sulted from a strong group 
performance from our 3rd 
through seventh man," said 
English. Coach English also 
added that a variety of 
nagging injuries to these 
runners hampered the har- 
riers in their efforts. 

The men have this weekend 
off as they will use this time to 
get in some extra practice and 
to heal some injuries said 
Coach English. 

While the men were 
having trouble last weekend 
the Lady Eagle harriers were 
busy defeating Grove City to 
raise their record to 4-0 on 
dual meets, while they are 5-0 
ininvitationals. 

Coach English called the 
ladies' win a great team effort. 
"One place difference would 
have been the difference be- 
tween winning and losing," 
said English. 

Cindy Ludwig from Grove 



City came across the finish 
line first against Clarion, but 
the Lady Eagles were able to 
comeback and get second, 
third, fifth and sixth place to 
defeat Grove city 27-29. 

Leading the Golden Eagle 
women across the finish were 
Kristan Swick and Denise 
Johnson who finished second 
and third respectively. 

The women's cross country 
team, who coach English said 
"have improved 300 per cent 
over last year," wiU be in 
action at Lock Haven this 
weekend as they take on Lock 
Haven and Slippery Rock. 

Men's Results 

Loss— CUP 30 Grove City 25 

Loss— CUP 35 Allegheny 20 

Win-CUPl5Thiel50 

Women's Results 

Win— CUP 27 Grove City 29 



On the Run.... 

(Continued from Page 15) 
Some aspects of the Sports Edi- 
tor's position have not been en- 
joyable, but the good heavily out- 
weigh the bad. 

Now that this fall semester is 
drawing up to the half way point, 
I'm beginning to realize how 
lucky I've been to be a part of 
Clarion's sports scene. Though I 
was another student writing for 
the campus newspaper, athletes 
and coaches alike have, and still 
do, treat me as a professional and 
I in return have tried to be fair 
and professional in my account of 
what is going on in Clarion sports. 
I think the attitude of Clarion 
athletics was summed up best by 
Ed Clark, a reserve defensive 
back on the Golden Eagle football 
team who served as a special 
teams catalyst and graduated 
after the 1986 season. "I just go 
out and do my job the best I can 
and let the big boys do the rest. " 



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Hun Judo — Standing left to right: Mark Davis, Tournament Director; Jeff 
Gurecl<a, CUP Hun; Dr. Andor P-Jobb, CUP Coach. 

Photo courtesy Coach P-Jobb 



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20-THE CLARION CALL, Clarion. PA, Thursday, Oct. 15, 1987' 



SPORTS 




Sports Spotlight.... on Dentse Johnson 



by Michael A. Sexauer 
Assistant Sports Editor 



Senior Denise Johnson 
began her fourth year run- 
ning cross country for 
Qarion University in Septem- 
ber. And, for the first time, 
Denise is running with a team. 

It takes five runners to 
make a team for cross coun- 



sertohome. 

New Castle, Pa., is home for 
Johnson, and Neshannock 
High School is her alma 
mater. 

When Denise began running 
in 7th grade, she was only fol- 
lowing the example of her five 
older brothers and sisters. 



"When I run, Fm alone and I can think — 
—it's my time,** 

— D. Johnson 



try. During Johnson's first 
three seasons, CUP's cross 
country women could only en- 
ter invitationals and represent 
the University as individuals. 

Now, in the fall of 1987, Qar- 
ion University has a women's 
Cross Country Team. That 
team is as of this writing un- 
defeated. 

Denise Johnson has gotten 
used to the idea of running 
with a team. Denise feels that 
this fact will make this year a 
personal best. 

Johnson was recruited in 
high school and offered run- 
ning scholarships to Pitt at 
Johnstown and Mary Wash- 
ington College in Vir^a. De- 
nise turned down both offers 
to come to Qarion because of 
the reputable Habilitative Sci- 
ence program and to stay clo- 

NCAAF 

DIVISION I TOP TWENn 

1. Oklahoma 5-0 

2. Nebraska 5-0 

3. Miami, Fla 4-0 

4. Florida St 5-1 

5. Auburn 4-0-1 

6. L.S.U 5-0-1 

7. Clemson 5-0 

8. Tennessee 4-0-1 

9. U.C.L.A 4-1 

10. Penn State 5-1 

11. Notre Dame 3-1 

12. Oklahoma St 5-0 

13. Syracuse 5-0 

14. Florida 4-2 

15. Arkansas 4-1 

16. Oregon 4-1 

17. Ohio State 3-1-1 

18. Georgia 4-2 

19. Michigan St 3-2 

20. Indiana 4-1 

DIVISION II TOP TWENTY 

1. South Dakota 6-0 

2. N. Michigan 6-0 

3. Texas A & I 4-1 

4. West Chester, Pa 5-1 

5. Portland St 4-1-1 

6. North Dakota St 4-1 

7. Tuskegee, Ala 5-0 

8. E. New Mexico 6-0 

9. North Alabama 5-0 



However, Denise has the 
honor of being the only John- 
son to continue running in col- 
lege. Denise's older brother 
Matt is currently the assistant 
cross country coach at Ne- 
shannock Hi^ School. 

At home, Denise and broth- 
er Matt train together. Some- 
times the friendly run ends up 
in a race to finish that Denise 
says she usually wins. 

As a member of the cross 
country and track teams, 
Jdinson was honored twice at 
Neshannock as the Tri-County 
Most Valuable Team Mem- 
ber; competing twice at the 
state meet. 

Even during the summer 
months Denise keeps in shape. 
Entering 5K and lOK runs, 
Johnson usually places for her 
age group in every race. 




DENISE JOHNSON Senior Cross Country runner for GUP 

Photo by Mike Bordo, Photography Editor 



Running every day may 
seem to some as monotonous 
or a hassle. Not so, says John- 
son, "I feel guilty if I miss a 
day of running." 

Denise also feels that 
running helps her grades. 
"When I run, I'm alone and I 
can think - it's my time." 

The Habilitative Science 
program is the real reason she 
came to Clarion. Johnson is 



currently carrying a 3.3 QPA 
and is a member of the Kappa 
Delta Pi Educational Honor 
Society. 

At this time, Johnson plans 
to graduate from Clarion in 
May and continue her educa- 
tion by earning a master's de- 
gree in Social Work; possibly 
at Pitt University. 

Writing poetry and playing 
piano occupy Denise s free 



time. Johnson also shyly 
admits to having an idol. TTie 
Italian Stallion Rocky Balboa 
and the theme from the movie 
"Rocky" often come to 
Doiise s mind as an inspira- 
tion when running those long 
miles. 

During the spring, Johnson 
can be seen running the 800M 
and 1500M races for the CUP 
track team. 



ootball Rankings 



10. Indiana, Pa 4-1 

11. Gal Poly-SLO 5-0 

12. Troy St., Ala 4-1-1 

13. New Haven 4-1 

14. Fort Valley St 3-1 

15. Glaremnt, Md., GIf 3-1 

16. Ashland, Ohio 4-1 

17. Cent. Florida 3-2 

18. Grand Valley St 4-2 

19. Santa Clara 4-1 

20. Butler, Ind 4-1 

tie Mansfield, Pa. 4-1 

DIVISION III TOP TWEHn 

1. Augustana, III 5-0 

2. Wash. & Jeff., Pa 6-0 

3. Wis.-Whitewater 5-1 

4. HofStra, N.Y 5-0 



5. Gustv Adiphs, Mn 5-0 

tie Susquehanna, Pa 50 

7. Dayton, Ohio 4-1 

tie Ithaca, N.y 3-1 

9. Gettysburg, Pa 5-0 

tie Hiram, Ohio 4-0 

11. Rochester, N.Y 5-0 

12. Luther, Iowa 5-0 

13. Baldwin-Wallace, Oh 41 

14. Ferrum, Va 5-0-1 

15. Claremt-Md, Clf 3-1-0 

16. Wagner, N.Y 5-1 

17. Widener, Pa 41 

18. Albany, N.Y 4-1 

19. Adrian, Mich 4-1 

20. Menio, Calif 4-1 



SPORTS CALENDAR 

October 15-21 

16 Tennis - PSAC Championship at Hershey 
Intramurai roster due for Foui Shooting 

17 Tennis — PSAC Championship at Hershey 
Football vs. Edinboro (H) 1 p.m. 

Women's X-Country at Lock Haven/Slippery Rock 
Early Small Game season begins 

19 Volleyball at Edinboro 

20 Volleyball vs. Mercyhurst (H) 7 p.m. 



PSAC Stand 

1917 PSAC FOOTBALL STATC 


in< 


3S 




WBnRN 










OVEAU 1 


MVISION 


W-l-T 


n 


PA 


W-L.T 


PF 


PA 


Indiana 


2-0-0 
2-0-0 


052 
048 


029 
028 


4-1-0 
3-2-0 


102 
085 


077 
096 


ShiDDensburg 


Clarion 


2-1-0 
2-1-0 


060 
095 


063 
066 


3-2-0 
3-3-0 


102 
142 


090 
143 


Slippery Rock 


California 


1-2-0 
0-2-0 


051 
052 


043 
094 


2-4-0 
2-4-0 


087 
123 


080 
143 


Edinboro 


Lock Haven 


0-3-0 


015 


080 


1-5-0 


041 129 
OVEAU 


EASTEtN 


MViSION 


W-IT 


ff 


PA 


W-LT 


Pf 


PA 


West Chester 


2-0-0 
2-0-0 
2-1-0 


069 
019 
044 


027 
008 
042 


5-1-0 
4-1-0 
4-2-0 


200 
091 
110 


093 
066 
084 


Mansfield 


Bloomsburg 


Millersville 


2-1-0 
1-1-0 


037 
027 


040 
037 


4-1-0 
1-4-0 


102 
066 


080 
190 


Kutztown 


Cheyney 


0-3-0 


005 


023 


2-4-0 


041 


046 


E. Stroudsburg 


0-3-0 


037 


061 


1-4-0 


055 


087 


THiSWEEKIND 






LAST WEEKEND'S 




(OaOBER 17tii) 








SCORB 






Edinboro at Clarion 


Indiana 24, Clarion 12 






Indiana at Lock Haven 


S. 


Rock 34, Lock Haven 




S. Rock at Shippensburg 


Shippensburg 26, Calif. 13 




Millersville at California 


W 


.Chester 49 


, Edinboro 28 




W. Chester at E. Stroudsburg 


Bloomsburg 14, Cheyney 




Bloomsburg at Mansfield 


Mansfield 13, 


Millersville 3 




Kutztown at Cheyney 


Kutztown 14, 


E. Stroudsburg 7 1 






More parking in tiie planning 



by Suzanne Halleman, 
News Staff Writer 



Public Safety, under the di- 
rection of John Postlewait, 
has developed approximately 
78 more parking spaces 
around campus. Hopefully, 
this will solve some of the 
parking problems. 

In parking lot R, which is 
between Becker Hall and 
McEntire Building, grass was 
removed providing 25 addi- 
tional parlang spaces. 

Behmd Thorn 2, they added 
an ad^tional five spaces, and 
in front of Thorn 2, one park- 
ing place was added along 
with one motorcycle space. 
Lot U, which is behind Becker, 



was extended to hold six more 
cars and one motorcycle 
space. 

"We are trying to encour- 
age employees from Becker, 
ROTC, McEntire Building and 
even Marwick-Boyd to park in 
these new spaces, giving stu- 
dents more space to park in lot 
B," said Postlewait. 

■fliere was also one space 
added near the electrical 
transformer in lot B. 

Four motorcycle spaces 
were added to lot C, next to the 
Chapel. Lot H, next to Carrier, 
was extended to hold two 
more cars. Two more parking 

spaces were also added to lot 
K. Lot D, between Given and 



Ralston, has two additional 
parking places. Eight spaces 
were created behmd the li- 
brary for people who work 
near there. 

In lot A, three handicapped 
spaces were eliminated oe- 
cause they weren't being 
used. This made four more 
regular spaces. Also in lot A, 
the grassy area which sur- 
rounded an unused exit made 
room for five spaces. 

There is also a project 
underway to add approxi- 
mately 10 spaces in lot D, near 
the water tower. 

"TTiere is a proposal to add 
spaces to lot J by eliminating 
the grassy areas where un- 



used driveways go onto 322, 
but there is an underground 
gas line which would have to 
be moved," said Mr. Postle- 
wait. 

Fines for illegal parking will 
increase from $2 to $5, with 
the arrival of the new parking 
tickets. Fines will be given to 
students parking in employee 
designated spaces. Also, em- 
ployees with out of state regis- 
tration will have 60 days with 
a temporary permit and they 
will not be given a registered 
permit until they show proof 
of registration of the vehicle. 

Already this year 1,700 
parking tickets were issued. 
An average of 5,000 tickets are 



issued a year. 

Faculty Senate has develop- 
ed a committee, which works 
with the Parking Committee, 
to propose suggestions on 
ways to solve the parking 
problem. "There may be a 

limit on permits of students 
who live off campus and a pos- 
sibility of restricting fresh- 
men and sophomores from 
having cars on camous, but 
that isn't likely," said Postle- 
wait. Also, after a student 
receives a certain number of 
tickets, his permit may be re- 
voked. Right now, these are 
just suggestions. The commit- 
tees are working on other 
possibilities. 



Thursday, Oct. 22, 1987 



Vol. 



No.7 



TKe 



LARION 



CALL 



diaXLon OXnivrs^zaUtf of zPenn^LfLaania 



Charley dies after week in coma 



by Deborah M. Schofield, Editor 
and Liz Koones, News Editor 



Charley's bronze sculp- 
tures, often erotic in nature, 

Mred B.Charley, associate are well known in Pittsbm-gji. 

professor of art at Clarion H^.^as just beginnmg to 

University, died October 14 at t^fJ^^SI^^Tll^f^'- 

8 p.m., one week after he was ^^n/^r h^ work^ ti^^^^l^S 

seriously injured in a three- S*'\ln!,^TMff^nrih 

vdncleLciJent south in But- ^^^^^j^,'^'"'''^^ 

From the accident, Charley Alfred B. Charley was born 

was taken to Butler Hospital on February 25, 1930 in a 

and later life-flighted to Pres- small town outside Chicago, 

byterian University Hospital, He received his B.S. and 

where he had undergone brain M.F.A. (Masters in Fine Arts) 

surgery and remained in a at Southern Illinois University 

drug-induced coma. He was in 1958. Charley taught at 

reported to have suffered North Dakota State College 

brain damage and his death and the University of Wiscon 



thing outside his work as an 
artist and teacher often took 
away from the accomplish- 
ment. "He liked this time to 
work." Thus, only a few in- 
dividuals really ever got to 
know Charley here at Clarion. 
In the art world, Charley is 
internationally known for his 



bronze sculptures and medal- 
lians. He had exhibitions in 
Paris, London, and Philadel- 
phia, as well as Pittsburgh, 
where he was chosen this 
year's artist of the year. He is 
also represented in the Smith- 
sonian Institution in Washing- 
ton, D.C., which just recently 






tf*, 



purchased one of his pieces. 
"It's extremely hard to be a 
good teacher and do what you 
have to do. . .your job as well 
as your own personal work. . . 
and get somewhere with it," 
said Grosch. "He did it ex- 
tremely well." 

(SeeCtiarley. ..PageS) 






was result of a closed head 
wound. 

ITie accident occurred Oc- 
tober 7 at 9:15 a.m. while 
Charley was travelling south 
on Route 8 near Butler. A 
northbound 1983 International 
truck, in the center left 
turning lane, crossed in front 
of Charley's southbound 1985 
Chevy Celebrity. After collid- 
ing with Charley, the truck 
slid left into a 1980 Interna- 
tional truck going east on Air- 
port Road. 

He is survived by his wife 
Maureen, and two children, 
Michael and Patricia, who 
have lived away from home 
for approximately 10 years. 
Charley was cremated Fri- 
day, Oct. 16. 



sin at Superior before coming 
to Qarion in 1963. 

Charley was both an artist 
and a teacher. He loved his 
work with sculpture and 
deligjited in the inspiration of 
his students. 

But although many knew of 
Charley and his works, not 
many knew the man himself. 
"He was a great guy. . .he was 
bright, witty. . .^f^ ilMfellect- 
ual," said Bill GroscK'fif the 
art department *ho ^ared an 
office with Chaney for%SDme 
22 years. "I don'tthink ^t of 
people saw that though^^d- 
ed Eugene Seelye, chAhan 
of the Art Departihent!^^*^ 
ley was a very prfyate p 
According to Grosch,: 













*Uke clay^irtkth« hands of an artist Al Charley enjoyed tils teactiing and delighted in the art of learning. 

C * '. > ■■ Photo by Bernice Bamburak, Contributing Photographer 



Peiree WMfcwMl WMtfier 

CfcHKfy wHh 8 chan^ of 
rein/snowrfluiTfos 



MU 



m 







Dizzy Jiszos^p CUP 

Features -k^^J^aee U 



Tenfris team wins P^C Titte 

SporU — Page 19 















'^^M.^' 






i 



•^ 



_A1.. 



▼ 



20-THE CLARION CALL, Clarion, PA, Thursday, Oct. 15, 1987 



SPORTS 



Sports Spotlight.... on Dentse Johnson 



by Michael A. Sexauer 
Assistant Sports Editor 



Senior Denise Johnson 
began her fourth year run- 
ning cross country for 
Clarion University in Septem- 
ber. And, for the first time, 
Denise is running with a team. 

It takes five runners to 
make a team for cross coun- 



ser to home. 

New Castle, Pa., is home for 
Johnson, and Neshannock 
High School is her alma 
mater. 

When Denise began running 
in 7th grade, she was only fol- 
lowing the example of her five 
older brothers and sisters. 



<< 



When I run, I'm alone and I can think — 
■it's my time." 

—D. Johnson 



try. During Johnson's first 
three seasons, CUP's cross 
country women could only en- 
ter invitationals and represent 
the University as individuals. 

Now, in the fall of 1987, Qar- 
ion University has a women's 
Cross Country Team. That 
team is as of this writing un- 
defeated. 

Denise Johnson has gotten 
used to the idea of running 
with a team. Denise feels that 
this fact will make this year a 
personal best. 

Johnson was recruited in 
high school and offered run- 
ning scholarships to Pitt at 
Johnstown and Mary Wash- 
ington College in Virginia. De- 
nise turned down both offers 
to come to Qarion because of 
the reputable Habilitative Sci- 
ence program and to stay clo- 



However, Denise has the 
honor of being the only John- 
son to continue running in col- 
lege. Denise's older brother 
Matt is currently the assistant 
cross country coach at Ne- 
shannock High School. 

At home, Denise and broth- 
er Matt train together. Some- 
times the friendly run ends up 
in a race to finish that Denise 
says she usually wins. 

As a member of the cross 
country and track teams, 
Johnson was honored twice at 
Neshannock as the Tri-County 
Most Valuable Team Mem- 
ber; competing twice at the 
state meet. 

Even during the summer 
months Denise keeps in shape. 
Entering 5K and lOK runs, 
Johnson usually places for her 
age group in every race. 




\ 



DEMISE JOHNSON Senior Cross Country runner for CUP 

Photo by Mike Bordo, Photography Editor 



Running every day may 
seem to some as monotonous 
or a hassle. Not so, says John- 
son, "I feel guilty if I miss a 
day of running." 

Denise also feels that 
running helps her grades. 
"When I run, I'm alone and I 
can think - it's my time." 

The Habilitative Science 
program is the real reason she 
came to Qarion. Johnson is 



currently carrying a 3.3 QPA 
and is a member of the Kappa 
Delta Pi Educational Honor 
Society. 

At this time, Johnson plans 
to graduate from Qarion in 
May and continue her educa- 
tion by earning a master's de- 
gree in Social Work; possibly 
at Pitt University. 

Writing poetry and playing 
piano occupy Denise's free 



time. Johnson also shyly 
admits to having an idol. The 
Italian Stallion Rocky Balboa 
and the theme from the movie 
"Rocky" often come to 
Denise's mind as an inspira- 
tion when running those long 
miles. 

During the spring, Johnson 
can be seen running the 800M 
and 1500M races for the CUP 
track team. 



NCAA Football Rankings 



DIVISION I TOP TWENTY 

Oklahoma 

Nebraska 

Miami, Fla 

Florida St 



1 
2 
3 
4. 
5. Auburn 4 



6. 
7. 
8. 
9. 



12. 
13. 
14. 
15. 
16. 
17. 
18. 
19. 
20. 

1. 



L.S.U 5 

Clemson 

Tennessee 4 

U.C.L.A 

10. Penn State 

1 1 . Notre Dame 

Oklahoma St 

Syracuse 

Florida 

Arkansas 

Oregon 

Ohio State 3 

Georgia 

Michigan St 

Indiana 

DIVISION II TOP TWENTY 

South Dakota 

2. N. Michigan 

3. Texas A & I 

4. Westchester, Pa 

5. Portland St 4 

6. North Dakota St 

7. Tuskegee Ala 

8. E. New Me.xico 

9. North Alabama 



5-0 
5-0 
4-0 
5-1 
■0-1 
0-1 
5-0 
0-1 
4-1 
5-1 
3-1 
5-0 
5-0 
4-2 
4-1 
4-1 
-11 
4-2 
3-2 
4-1 

6-0 
6-0 
4-1 
5-1 
1-1 
4-1 
5-0 
6-0 
5-0 



10. Indiana, Pa 41 

11. Gal Poly-SLO 5-0 

12. Troy St., Ala 4-1-1 

13. New Haven 4-1 

14. Fort Valley St 3-1 

15. Claremnt, Md., Clf 3-1 

16. Ashland, Ohio 4-1 

17. Cent. Florida 3-2 

18. Grand Valley St 4-2 

19. Santa Clara 4-1 

20. Butler, Ind 4-1 

tie Mansfield, Pa. 4-1 

DIVISION III TOP TWENTY 

1. Augustana, III 5-0 

2. Wash. & Jeff., Pa 6-0 

3. Wis.-Whitewater 5-1 

4. Hofstra, N.Y 5-0 



5. Gustv Adiphs, Mn 5-0 

tie Susquehanna, Pa 5-0 

7. Dayton, Ohio 4-1 

tie Ithaca, N.y 3-1 

9. Gettysburg, Pa 5-0 

tie Hiram, Ohio 4-0 

11. Rochester, N.Y 5-0 

12. Luther, Iowa 5-0 

13. Baldwin Wallace, Oh 4-1 

14. Ferrum, Va 5-0 1 

15. Claremt-Md, Clf 3-1-0 

16. Wagner, N.Y 5-1 

17. Widener, Pa 4-1 

18. Albany, N.Y 4-1 

19. Adrian, Mich 4-1 

20. Menio, Calif 4-1 



SPORTS CALENDAR 

October 15-21 

16 Tennis - PSAC Championship at Hershey 
Intramural roster due for Foul Shooting 

17 Tennis — PSAC Championship at Hershey 
Football vs. Edinboro (H) 1 p.m. 

Women's X-Country at Lock Haven/Slippery Rock 
Early Small Game season begins 

19 Volleyball at Edinboro 

20 Volleyball vs. Mercyhurst (H) 7 p.m. 



PSAC Stand 

1987 PSAC FOOTBALL STATS 


in< 


JS 


k 
1 


WESTERN 










OVEALL 1 


DIVISION 


W-IT 


PF 


PA 


WIT 


PF 


PA 


Indiana 


2-0-0 
2-0-0 


052 
048 


029 
02fl 


4-1-0 
3-2-0 


102 
085 


077 
096 


Shippensburg 


Clarion 


2-1-0 
2-1-0 


060 
095 


063 
066 


3-2-0 
3-3-0 


102 
142 


090 
143 


Slippery Rock 


California 


1-2-0 
0-2-0 


051 
052 


043 
094 


2-4-0 
2-4-0 


087 
123 


080 
143 


Edinboro 


Lock Haven 


0-3-0 


015 


080 


1-5-0 


041 129 
OVEAU 


EASTERN 


DIVISION 


WIT 


PF 


PA 


W-l-T 


PF 


PA 


West Chester 


2-0-0 
2-0-0 
2-1-0 


069 
019 
044 


027 
008 
042 


5-1-0 
4-1-0 
420 


200 
091 
110 


093 
066 
084 


Mansfield 


Bloomsburg 


Millersville 


2-1-0 


037 


040 


4-10 


102 


080 


Kutztown 


11-0 


027 


037 


1-40 


066 


190 


Cheyney 


0-3-0 


005 


023 


240 


041 


046 


E. Stroudsburg 


3 


037 


061 


140 


055 


087 


THIS WEEKEND 






LAST WEEKEND'S 




(OaOBERlZth) 








SCORES 






Edinboro at Clarion 


Indiana 24, Clarion 12 






Indiana at Lock Haven 


S. 


Rock 34, Lock Haven 




S. Rock at Shippensburg 


Shippensburg 26, Calif. 13 




Millersville at California 


W 


. Chester 49 


, Edinboro 28 




W. Chester at E. Stroudsburg 


Bloomsburg 14, Cheyney 




Bloomsburg at Mansfield 


Mansfield 13, 


Millersville3 




Kutztown at Cheyney 


Kutztown 14, 


E. Stroudsburg 7 1 



More parking in the planning 



by Suzanne Halleman, 
News Staff Writer 



Public Safety, under the di- 
rection of John Postlewait, 
has developed approximately 
78 more parking spaces 
around campus. Hopefully, 
this will solve some of the 
parking problems. 

In parking lot R, which is 
between Becker Hall and 
McEntire Building, grass was 
removed providing 25 addi- 
tional parlang spaces. 

Behind Thorn 2, they added 
an additional five spaces, and 
in front of Thorn 2, one park- 
ing place was added along 
with one motorcycle space. 
Lot U, which is behind Becker, 



was extended to hold six more 
cars and one motorcycle 
space. 

"We are trying to encour- 
age employees from Becker, 
ROTC, McEntire Building and 
even Marwick-Boyd to park in 
these new spaces, giving stu- 
dents more space to park in lot 
B," said Postlewait. 

There was also one space 
added near the electrical 
transformer in lot B. 

Four motorcycle spaces 
were added to lot C, next to the 
Chapel. Lot H, next to Carrier, 
was extended to hold two 
more cars. Two more parking 

spaces were also added to lot 
K. Lot D, between Given and 



Ralston, has two additional 
parking places. Eight spaces 
were created behind the li- 
brary for people who work 
near there. 

In lot A, three handicapped 
spaces were eliminated be- 
cause they weren't being 
used. This made four more 
regular spaces. Also in lot A, 
the grassy area which sur- 
rounded an unused exit made 
room for five spaces. 

There is also a project 
underway to add approxi- 
mately 10 spaces in lot D, near 
the water tower. 

"There is a proposal to add 
spaces to lot J by eliminating 
the grassy areas where un- 



used driveways go onto 322, 
but there is an underground 
gas line which would have to 
be moved," said Mr. Postle- 
wait. 

Fines for illegal parking will 
increase from $2 to $5, with 
the arrival of the new parking 
tickets. Fines will be given to 
students parking in employee 
designated spaces. Also, em- 
ployees with out of state regis- 
tration will have 60 days with 
a temporary permit and they 
will not be given a registered 
permit until they show proof 
of registration of the vehicle. 

Already this year 1,700 
parking tickets were issued. 
An average of 5,000 tickets are 



Thursday, Oct. 22, 1987 




issued a year. 

Faculty Senate has develop- 
ed a committee, which works 
with the Parking Committee, 
to propose suggestions on 
ways to solve the parking 
problem. "There may be a 

limit on permits of students 
who live off campus and a pos- 
sibility of restricting fresh- 
men and sophomores from 
having cars on camous, but 
that isn't likely," said Postle- 
wait. Also, after a student 
receives a certain number of 
tickets, his permit may be re- 
voked. Right now, these are 
just suggestions. The commit- 
tees are working on other 
possibilities. 



Vol.59 No. 7 



LARION 



CALL 



CfaiLon %Lniu£.xii.itif of lpEnni.LjLuania 



Charley dies after week in coma 



by Deborah M. Schofield, Editor 
and Liz Koones, News Editor 

Alfred B. Charley, associate 
professor of art at Clarion 
University, died October 14 at 
8 p.m., one week after he was 
seriously injured in a three- 
vehicle accident south in But- 
ler. 

From the accident, Charley 
was taken to Butler Hospital 
and later life-flighted to Pres- 
byterian University Hospital, 
where he had undergone brain 
surgery and remained in a 
drug-induced coma. He was 
reported to have suffered 
brain damage and his death 
was result of a closed head 
wound. 

The accident occurred Oc- 
tober 7 at 9:15 a.m. while 
Charley was travelling south 
on Route 8 near Butler. A 
northbound 1983 International 
truck, in the center left 
turning lane, crossed in front 
of Charley's southbound 1985 
Chevy Celebrity. After collid- 
ing with Charley, the truck 
slid left into a 1980 Interna- 
tional truck going east on Air- 
port Road. 

He is survived by his wife 
Maureen, and two children, 
Michael and Patricia, who 
have lived away from home 
for approximately 10 years. 
Charley was cremated Fri- 
day, Oct. 16. 



Charley's bronze sculp- 
tures, often erotic in nature, 
are well known in Pittsburgh. 
He was just beginning to 
achieve international recogni- 
tion for his work. A major ex- 
hibit of his works will be held 
in January at the Pittsburgh 
Center for the Arts. 

Alfred B. Charley was born 
on February 25, 1930 in a 
small town outside Chicago. 
He received his B.S. and 
M.F.A. (Masters in Fine Arts) 
at Southern Illinois University 
in 1958. Charley taught at 
North Dakota State College 
and the University of Wiscon- 
sin at Superior before coming 
to Qarion in 1963. 

Charley was both an artist 
and a teacher. He loved his 
work with sculpture and 
delighted in the inspiration of 
his students. 

But although many knew of 
Charley and his works, not 
many knew the man himself. 
"He was a great guy. . .he was 
bright, witty. . .%^f^ intellect- • 
ual," said BUI CJrosch of the 
art department ^ho ^ared an 
office with ChaKey fof»SDriie 
22 years. "I don't think Jlpt of 
people saw that though,^ add- 
ed Eugene Seelye, ch#man 
of the Art Department?-pi^r- 
ley was a very pn\ate peteop> . 
According to Grosch,: m^ 



thing outside his work as an 
artist and teacher often took 
away from the accomplish- 
ment. "He liked this time to 
work." Thus, only a few in- 
dividuals really ever got to 
know Charley here at Clarion. 
In the art world, Charley is 
intemationaUy known for his 



bronze sculptures and medal- 
lians. He had exhibitions in 
Paris, London, and Philadel- 
phia, as well as Pittsburgh, 
where he was chosen this 
year's artist of the year. He is 
also represented in the Smith- 
sonian Institution in Washing- 
ton, D.C., which just recently 



purchased one of his pieces. 
"It's extremely hard to be a 
good teacher and do what you 
have to do . .your job as well 
as your own personal work. . . 
and get somewhere with it," 
said Grosch. "He did it ex- 
tremely well." 

(See Charley. . .Page 3) 




Like ciay'iiVthe hands of an artist Al Charley enjoyed his teaching and delighted in the art of learning. 

»»; • •- , • Photo by BerniceBamburak. Contributing Photographer 



Peirce Weekend Weather 

Cloudy with a chance of 

rain/snow f lunles 

Highs In the mid 40*8 




Dizzy jazzes up CUP 

Features -^Page 11 



Tennis team wins PSAC Title 

Sports — Page 19 



2-THE CLARION CALL, Clarion, PA, Thursday, Oct. 22, 1987 




Life's Flickering Flame 

by Deborah M. Schofield 
Editor-in-Chief 

On the morning of Wednesday, October 7, a Clarion University art 
professor made his way toward Pittsburgh on a routine errand for art 
supplies. Back at Clarion, students were mshing to classes. . .hitting 
noisy snooze alarms — going about business as usual. But part way be- 
tween his home and his destination, Al Charley's business was anything 
but usual. Caught in the middle of a three-car accident, Charley was se- 
verely injured and rushed to Presbyterian Hospital In Pittsburgh for treat- 
ment. A little over a week later, the life from this inspiring artist was 
snatched away. Clarion mourns his death while paying tribute to him 
and his work. But business continues as usual. 

Life is a precious gem which at any unknown moment can be 
snatched away. Our lives are like shells which the ocean tumbles ashore 
then quickly gathers back. Because we do not know the moment at 
which we will return from where we came, each day in our lives must be 
treated as our last. Not treated as our last in a morbid sense, but rather 
in a celebration of life. Each day should be a day of accomplishment. . . 

a day when we tell someone that we love them a day to reach higher 

for our goals. For once we are gone, business returns to usual and our 
contributions to life serve as eternal marks and memories. 

From the time that we were bom, we live each day at risk. As we fell 
from our banana seat bike, and lost our grip of the bright rubber pool 
ring, our parents gasped and rushed to our sides. As we got older, par- 
ents waited up late to make sure we got home from the movies alright, 
and doted over the locks on our doors before they left our dorm rooms 
freshmen year. Throughout college and upon graduation, we become re- 
sponsible for our own lives even though parents, girlfriends, boyfriends, 
wives, and husbands worry on. By now, we have become so active that 
our daily risks become even greater. 

See Life.... Page 3) 



(ij^The Clarion Call 

\Jy Room 1 Harvey Hai l 

Clarion University of Pennsylvania 
^^ Clarion, Pennsylvania 16214 

n I Pfione 814-226-2380 

[ialiiiir 
^■■■■■■1 

THE STAFF 

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News Editor LIZ M. KOONES 

Features Editor MARIA L. KAPSAK 

Sports Editor DAVID M. MAHAFFEY 

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Ad Sales Manager RICHARD W. FAIRBEND 

Business Manager MICHAEL P. BAUER 

Adviser ART BARLOW 

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Circulation Manager PETER B. McMILLEN 

Copy Editors DAN BRINLEY and VONDA SWARTS 



The Clarion Call is published every Thursday during the school year in accordance with the school 
calendar. Editors accept contributions to their sections from any source, but reserve the right to edit 
all copy for libel, taste, style and length. 

The absolute deadline for editorial copy is 12:00 noon on Monday. 

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We remember the days of the 
foundry out back of Founders Hall 
where Al Charley used to work and 
supervise the pourings of his, and his 
students' bronze castings. To those 
who knew him best, he was a found- 
ryman, artist and teacher. 

For Al, bronze, "the alloy of an- 
tiquity," was his chosen medium, 
and he communicated much of what 
he thought and felt by means of it. 
He used it to challenge hyprocrisy 
and with it he fashioned his subject 
matter, often to joust with conven- 
tion. Yet each effort was scholarly 
and sincere, designed to provide the 
critics with something to puzzle 
over, discover and value. The result 
is in evidence as these works have 
grown in recognition and gained ex- 
hibition both in this country and in 
Europe. 

Since Al's untimely death last 
week we have concerned ourselves 
in regard to an in memoriam selec- 
tion for this edition. Our choice is 
this Hide Park contribution as writ- 
ten by him and published in the Call 
of February 27, 1986. 

L. A. Pfaff 
Like all five-year-olds, I entered 
kindergarten with that mix of antici- 
pation and dread any imaginative 
child (all children are imaginative) 
might conjure. To arrest these fears, 
a beautiful woman of restrained 
tastes, conservative intentions and 
tidy tendencies, "neither young nor 
fair," encouraged the class to draw 
self-portraits. "Picture yourself 
doing something you might enjoy," 
she said. 

Feeling at once eager to please my 
teacher, and an intense pressure 
forming from within, a strong desire 
to urinate, I drew a small boy, nak- 

Norm's Dorm 



ed, body in profile, belly distended, 
(as in truth), head turned, as if fac- 
ing a camera, smiling happily, 
hands on a larger than life-size 
penis, (all children make larger that 
which they would give greater sig- 
nificance) "making pee." 

My drawing was the apparent 
equivalent to the visionary honor of 
a Bosch or Dali. The fulfillment of a 
wish drawn, a representation of na- 
ture calling, or rather, nature acting 
(my point of view being internal), 
was seized upon with boundless 
indignation, disgust and outrage. 
The beautiful Miss Hilter (the name 
is a fiction) flew into a ferocious 
convulsion. "Innocence" had truly 
and abruptly "crossed to know- 
ledge." "Where," she said, "had I 
learned such behavior?" "Your 
mother would hear of this, ' ' she said, 
and I immediately visualized a 
hand-cuffed child marching to court, 
parents in tow. My father, an early 
opponent to anything "artistic" 
would no doubt side with the prose- 
cution. 

Unadulterated truth had obtained 
an adult hearing, had received sud- 
den, wholehearted attention and 
recognition. A career was in the 
making. To have touched beauty 
with truth at five must surely be a 
calling. Provocation was the key. To 
be a thorn in the groin of "art 
lovers," to complicate an under- 
standing, to make things difficult, to 
advance the guard, to be a "mod- 
em" artist. Could anything be more 
fulfilling? Still my real purpose re- 
mained unnoticed. Better to be mis- 
understood than lose my dignity to 
reason. 

How, after all, to interpret the 
young modern? What meanings? 



What conclusions? Had the cheeky 
child challenged the social order? 
Had the naughty kindergartener 
broken an 11th commandment? 
(Thou shalt not graven portraits 
peeing, etc.) Was this classic "penis 
envy" in reverse? Hadn't Freud 
diagnosed a case of phallicism in 
Venice? I reflected silently. And in 
the same year the child in question 
would render (with exquisite deli- 
cacy) two perfectly shaped breasts 
with matching nipples, suckled by 
that same barbarious boy. "Beast 
fear," one would have to assume, 
recognized by dairy farmers every- 
where, and an irritant to cows the 
world over. Once more, as if on cue, 
Hilter hit the roof. 

A central and vital point must be 
made here; the tyrant teacher had 
served art well. Art thwarted would 
rise again. Michelangelo had his Jul- 
ius n, I would have Miss Hilter. She 
would unwittingly nourish; 
inadvertantly advance art's cause 
by impeding its expression. She 
would set in motion a profound rhy- 
thm. 

Needless to say, my drawings 
were forth-rightly shredded and de- 
posited in the waste, while my class- 
mates' efforts (having copied them- 
selves or one another) (all children 
are copyists) were exhibited above 
the chalkboard. My face, like my 
art, was properly and promptly 
placed out of sight, where, while in 
the corner, in retaliation, I made my 
puddle, point, and exit. 

I had accepted at five that forces 
directed against free expression 
were everywhere, that AMERICA 
was not yet ready; in no mood for 
my brand of artistic self-display. 
(See Park. ...Page 4) 



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The Call Mailbox 



THE CUVRION CALL, Clarion. PA, Thursday, Oct. 22. 1987-3 



Mors about movies 

Dear Editor, 

Upon reading the movie review in 
the October 15 edition of the Oarion 
Call I have developed a theory as to 
why the journalists are so very fond 
of delivering a detailed synopsis of 
every film reviewed. First, I feel 
that maybe they have nothing what- 
soever to talk about; in effect, a 
synopsis results. Second, "Are you 
tring to save college students some 
money by giving us the film in print, 
so that we don't have to pay to see 
it?" 

The movie-going public suffers 
greatly at the hands of sadists who 
"hack up" defenseless films. That is 
to say that unskilled reviewers take 
the easy way out and provide a brief, 
oh, if it were only brief, synopsis. 

But not only do they synopsize; 
they over-synopsize the reviewed 
movie. Provided for the reader is a 



detailed Ust of the action scene by 
scene. Is it the belief of the review- 
ers that the average movie-goer 
cannot synthesize for himself plots 
of movies? 

Incidentaly Mr. Tomczak, I was 
unaware that movies were divided 
into two parts. In your reviews you 
are constantly referrring to "the 
first half of the movie," and "the 
second half of the movie." I don't re- 
call such a phenomenon. Are you 
viewing the same movies that I'm 
viewing? What are they like? Are 
there marching bands playing in be- 
tween halves?, or perhaps cheer- 
leaders who encourage the "fans" to 
support their favorite actor or act- 
ress? 

I will not belabor this point. I only 
ask that you discontinue spoiling 
movies for people who have not yet 
seen them. This hideous practice of 
yours is not only aggravating me, 
but also several others with whom I 



Life. . . . 



(Continued from Page 2) 

And as we grow from that toddler to adult, our talents, skills, and 
love of life emerge and develop. Faced with the choice to develop them 
or let them waste away, life's risks tell us LIVE. By developing In- 
dividual talents, we make lasting contributions to this world which first 
breathed its life Into us. And throughout our development, we should 
learn to love life and enjoy it in its full potential. For each day Is a risk. . . 
and each day may be our last. 

Al Charley worked at what he believed In, and came to love life. His 
major contributions to the art world will last. . .and his voice will always 
be heard. 

In honor of Al Charley and all those reading this piece who have yet 
to live and conquer life, I dedicate this poem of life and its preciousness. 

Lapping up)on the sandy beach, 

Mother Nature casts her jewels, 

For wandering combers to collect 

And gulls to crackle through. 

From dune to dune she displays her wares, 
For within her dark cloak she has plenty. 
They sputter bit by bit into a disordered array 
From mouths of the waves - as she's sent them. 

A ^ost crab, a gull, a wandering soul 
Shuffle among the midst, 
Interrupted a bit by the cold touch 
Of Mother Nature's cleansing lips. 

And as the warm breeze turns cool 
And the sea oats begin to shadow. 
Mother Nature sputters a final yawn, 
And her treasures she begins to gather. 

Back to the sea she takes her wares. 

Mysteriously all along. 

A roar, a spurt, a loud crackling cough 

Cries Nature's continuous song. t)y Deborah M. SchofMd 



Comments are accepted and encour- 
aged as Letters to the Editor. 
All Letters must be signed, but 
names will be held upon 
Request Drop all letters at 
the Clarion Call Office, 
1 Harvey Hall 




have spoken. 

So, please, I am begging you, stop 
this type of reviewing. I, along with 
many other movie-goers, am willing 
to pay the price of a ticket to mini- 
mize the amount of paper used in 
your reviews. 

Sincerely, 

Brenda Durkacs 

Review response 

Dear Mary Retort, 

Maybe it wasn't a very good idea 
for me to take responsibility for the 
drama reviews this year. I am over- 
burdened with graduate work as it is 
and I usually have to leave one of my 
three night classes early so that I 
may attend the evening perform- 
ances. 

My credentials for reviewing dra- 
matic performances are probably 



not what they should be. I have 
never been involved in theatre, so I 
do not have an appreciation for what 
goes on behind the scenes. I apolo- 
gize for anyone whom I have slight- 
ed. 

In closing, I do appreciate your 
need for useful and constructive 
criticism, but maybe another 
student could perform the task more 
efficiently. Good luck in the future. 
Sincerely, 
Michael Downing 

From A to Z 

Dear Editor, 

As I walk around our beautiful 
campus, I see the names of a few of 
the retired faculty members upon 
the facades of the buildings. It may 
have been more appropriate for the 
administration to have just painted 
the letters A-Z individually on each 



Charley. . . 



His bold work both shocked 
and intrigued its viewers. 
"His sculpture was something 
that I don't think you could ig- 
nore," said Seelye. **You 
might not like it. . .you might 
like it. . .but you couldn't ig- 
nore it. His subject matter 
was sometimes political. . . 
sometimes satirical. . .some- 
times exotic." More recently, 
Charley's works became 
more subtle as he began work- 
ing in bas relief (like the rais- 
ed head of a coin). "He was 
getting to the point that every- 
thing he did was very intuitive 
and exactly right on," said 
Grosch. "He just kept getting 
better." 

But besides his work in 
creation and exhibition, 
Charley was a teacher, an in- 
spiration. "I was most im- 
pressed with his teaching," 
said Grosch. "He was one of 
the best teachers I've ever run 
across. . .and not many people 
knew that either." With the 
university since 1963, Charley 
moved — along with the art 
department — from Davis to 
Founders to Marwick-Boyd. 
Grosch shared in some of the 
moves and became very in- 
tune with Charley ana his 
teaching. "He didn't make a 
habit of running around work- 



■(Continued from Page 1) 

ing on everyone's work. But if 
he had to show a student what 
he meant by something, he 
would take a tool in his hand 
and just within a matter of a 
few pushes or pulls or scrapes 
with a tool, he would make a 
nose that was supposed to be 
on that person." 

Catherine Boyer took over 
Charley's classes for the re- 
mainder of the year. As a for- 
mer student of Charley's, 
Boyer admired his ability to 
see beauty. "And he could 
teach someone else how to see 
beauty," she added. She an- 
ticipates the classes to be a 
good experience and a chance 
to unfold her own ideas, many 
of which were inspired by 
Charley. 

Tacked on the wall in an of- 
fice upstairs from the clay stu- 
dio is a poem entitled "The 
Serious Artist." When Charley 
was once asked if he was a 
serious artist, he replied, "I 
think so. One test of art's dur- 
ability is its power to engage 
the next generation. . .its abil- 
ity to remain true or even par- 
tiaUy true against time. Will 
time and change so drastical- 
ly undermine yesterday's 
truth as to render it false or 
unreadable? In reference to 
my own work, that question is 
oidy now being answered. " 



CPS 




building for identification, because 
there is obviously no respect for 
some of the persons whom the build- 
ings were named after. If there is re- 
spect for these people, their names 
would be readable to anyone who 
looks at them not knowing them be- 
forehand. The lettering on Ralston 
Hall (what little is left) is amid frag- 
ments of string and double faced 
tape; and there are several letters 
also missing from Egbert Hall and 
Stevens Hall. Is there too much 
effort and money involved in fixing 
these up? Considering the amount of 
time and money spent on super- 
fluous things like monstrous light 
posts in front of the President's 
house, I think money and time could 
be allocated to show a little respect 
to those people who helped make a 
lot of what we have on our campus 
today possible. 

Scott E.Keller 

Bldg. H 



'Adopt' addition 

Dear Editor, 

I would like to add some informa- 
tion to the report on Adopt-A-Grand- 
parent. Campus Ministry orginated 
the Adopt-A-Grandparent Program 
and has continued to arrange the 
orientation sessions with the Activi- 
ties Director at the Clarion Health 
Care Manor, to publicize the pro- 
gram on campus and to encourage 
students in their commitment. Both 
residents and students do benefit 
from the contact, and United Cam- 
pus Ministry is pleased to continue 
to sponsor the program. 

Sincerely, 
Janice Gnmenwald 

Coordinator 

United Campus Ministry 




Got a 
Problem? 

Have a 
Question? 

Ask 

Ann 

Frances! 

Send your ques- 
tions to 105 Riemer 
do The Clarion 
Call and wait 
for her published 
response. 



-»• 



4-THE CLARION CALL, Clarion, PA, Thursday. Oct. 22, 1987 



THE CLARION CALL, Clarion, PA, Thursday. Oct. 22, 1987-5 



Reluctant bank forces colleges to close 



(CPS) - A bank's decision 
to stop processing loans for 
students at Adelplii Business 
College, one of the largest 
business school chains in the 
country, has forced the school 
to close down and sent about 
2,500 students scurrying for a 
way to continue their educa- 
tions. 

TTie students' plight could 
extend to others enrolled in 
proprietary colleges — pri- 
vately owned, for-profit trade 
or vocational schools that, ac- 
cording to a September con- 
gressional report, are so good 
at getting Guaranteed Student 
Loans (GSLs) for their stu- 
dents that they're using up 
loan money that students at 
other colleges would ordina- 
rily get. 



European artists, too, would come to 
know my fate on a scale impre- 
cedoited and with a vengeance un- 
known; unknowable. I was six in 
1936. Cubism and Fauvism had play- 
ed out long ago. Dada/Surrealism 
was in its prime in France; but in 
Germany, all forms of free expres- 
sion woidd run head long into Nazi/ 
Fascism. 

In 1937 signs of imminent disaster 
were unmistakable. Picasso's 
profrfietic Guernica was bom. Hit- 
ler's henchmen were busy "curat- 
ing" the infamous Exhibition of De- 
generate Art; that would include Pi- 
casso, Matisse, Chagall, Van Gogh, 
Gaugain, Grosz, Kokaschk, KoU- 
witz, Barlach, and Beckmann, 
among others, and later that same 
year would squelch free expression 
totally; expell Germany's finest art- 
ists, and in months to come threaten 



Put your degree 

to work 
where it can do 
a world of good. 

Your first job after graduation 
should offer more than just a 
paycheck. 

If you're graduating this year, 
look into a unique oppor- 
tunity to put your degree to 
work where it can do a world 
of good. Look into the Peace 
Corps. 



Senior Interviews: 

November 13 
Sign up today at 
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But after a bank said it 
would no longer process 
Adelphi students' loan appli- 
cations, the whole 13-college 
chain closed, Adelphi Pres- 
ident Albert Terranova said. 

Adelphi had 13 campuses in 
New York, Arizona, California 
and Michigan. 

It also had a bankruptcy fil- 
ing under Chapter 11, a class 
action suit for allegedly not 
delivering what it promised its 
New York students, and a dis- 
pute with the Higher Educa- 
tion Assistance Foundation 
(HEAF). 

In an earlier interview with 
the Associated Press, Terra- 
nova said the schools closed 
because First Independent 
Trust Co. of Sacramento, 
Calif., refused to process stu- 



dents' applications for guar- 
anteed loans. 

Terranova also said Adel- 
phi's closing was only tempor- 
ary. 

"It's difficult to believe the 
operation was so hand-to- 
mouth that a lender declining 
to process loans would have 
been the final blow. Few 
schools depend on one 
lender," said Craig Ulrich, 
general counsel of the Con- 
sumer Banking Association in 
Washington, D.C. 

Glen Bigelow, executive 
vice president of First Inde- 
pendent Trust, explained that 
HEAF, the guarantor for his 
bank's student loans, placed 
various stipulations on loans 
to Adelphi students that had to 
be met before the loan was 



I QiKb ■ ■ ■ 



(Continued from Page 2) 

the whole of civilization itself. 

Back home, in the safety and free- 
dom of Chicago's south side within a 
nostril's hair of the stockyards, the 
upstart child artist had grown older 
by a year. He would, in his seventh 
year, be placed on a bus to "vaca- 
tion" with his grandparents on their 
farm in Indiana. To Grandfather's 
house he'd go — where the rituals 
of rural life were staged daily, acted 
out dramatically. 

Chickens' heads were yanked 
from their bodies. This was Grand- 
ma's task — woman's work. Cows 
and horses were shot between the 
eyes, sheep bludgeoned to oblivion. 
The farm as I saw it then, dispatch- 
ed death; slaughtered innocence 
routinely. 

To a sensitive child, (all children 
are sensitive), bom to concrete, 
Grandpa's farm was one of the most 
brutal vacation spots in the world. 
To children of the city, animals were 
playmates, loved ones. Windy City 
life could not have prepared anyone 
for Grandpa's farm. Chicago's car- 
nal reputation (home to the St. Val- 
entine's Day Massacre, with Al Ca- 
pone as its reigning terrorist) paled 
by comparison. 

The vacation culminated with the 
massive castration (need I say it) 
(in effigy, I'm sure) of an entire 



swineherd. Pig by pig, nut by nut, 
squeezed from their containers. I 
panned and delivered them to 
Grandma's kitchen. Grandpa liked 
his hog balls fresh. I caught the 
Greyhound back to the "Gty of the 
Big Shoulders" "Hog Butcher to the 
World;" INDEED. Men, animals 
that we are, (Gramps' taste for tes- 
tes no exception), under extremely 
violent conditions (hangings, be- 
headings, etc) have been known to 
die with erections, to ejaculate and 
expire at one and the same moment. 
That phenomenon was known to me 
at seven; and this has been confirm- 
ed and reaffirmed as so; as truth. 

Meanwhile in Europe, the Nazis, 
with the aid of the Berlin Fire Brig- 
ades, were holding local bonfires 
and rallying the people to destroy 
the best of its art, one more signpost 
to the devastation that would follow. 
Half a century has passed since 
that first day in kindergarten. I 
would come to accept, to believe 
even, (however romantically) that 
art is borne of an intense pressure 
from within; of mind, heart, and 
soul or groin (both architectural 
and sexual) ; that art is a passage to 
truth, and that truth is something 
artists (in their art) are duty-bound 
to tell, and I believe that still. 

—A. B. Charley 




We*ve Got the Perfect Combination. . . 



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NORTH 5th AVE. 226^12 



made. 

"It was too costly to handle 
each application manually. It 
was a losing proposition for 
us to follow the stipulations, 
process the application and 
wait for assurance from the 
guarantor," Bigelow added. 

"We couldn't operate that 
way." 

The CBA's Ulrich added 
other banks may stop making 
GSLs to trade college students 
in the near future because 
they, too, don't make much 
money on them. 

"In revising the Higher Ed- 
ucation Act (in 1986), Con- 
gress narrowed the yield fi- 
nancial institutions get from 
the GSLs. As the yield is re- 
duced, the credit policies 
tighten," said Ulrich. 

"Trade and technical 
schools, proprietary schools 
will suffer. Banks will have to 
ask if a school's graduates 
were successful in getting jobs 



and paying back loans. ' ' 

On the other hand, most pro- 
prietary schools depend 
heavily on federal assistance. 
And for their students, those 
schools may represent the 
chance of a lifetime, said First 
Trust's Bigelow. If the finan- 
cial aid is cut off, "their fate is 
sealed." 

TTie Student Affairs Com- 
mittee of the Faculty Senate 
will hold open hearings on 
policies relating to so<^ed 
same day registration/class 
opening, add/drop, and the 
nine-week withdrawal period. 
"Hie Committee invites inter- 
ested members of the campus 
community to express their 
views on these issues between 
2 and 4:30 p.m. on Octobo- 27, 
1987 in 206 Founders Hall. 

CAMPUS DIRECTORIES 

Campus Directories are available 
to OFF-CAMPUS Students in ROOM 
108 RIEMER CENTER with VALID 
ID. Stop in betweoi l p.m. and 5 p.m. 




by Liz Koonea, 
News Editor 



Last week, the Dow Jones in- 
dustrial averaged closed at 
24^.21, and logged the biggest 
one-week point loss of 158.78, and 
the biggest one-day point loss of 
91.55. The oldest record had been 
a 141.03 pomt decline on the week 
of September 12, 1986. 

Last week's rout hit investors 
very hard, and leaves many un- 
certain about the market's 
future. Some are worried that a 
selling panic may begin. 

Researchers give two possible 
explanations for the market loss. 
One is that the market is exper- 
iencing an "October massacre" 
similar to ones in 1978 and 1979. In 
October of both years, the Dow 
plunged while interest rates 
climbed. Each time, the Dow 
temporarily lost 11% of its value, 
and then it ended. Another 
explanation is that the drop could 
be a replay of 1962. Stocks be- 
came so overvalued that they col- 
lapsed under their own weight. 
Eight weeks later it ended, but 



stocks droi^)ed 26 percent during 
that time. 

When measured in percentage 
terms, recent losses aren't as 
near to Depression level as some 
had thought. Last Tuesday's 3.5 
percent drop does not even rival 
the infamous 11.7 percent decline 
that took place on Black Monday, 
Oct. 29, 1929. 

Even though the market's 
mood swings have been more fre- 
qurat recently, analysts say the 
swings are well within historical 
boundaries. 

The Dow Jones, which exper- 
ienced a record high of almost 
2700 in August, is expected to 
level off around 2400 sometime 
this week. Analysts expect three 
to five percent mood swings be- 
fore the market settles down. 

Investors have come through 
this past week bruised but not 
broken. Interest rate worries 
may keep many investors on the 
sidelines this week, until they can 
assess the entire situation. Right 
now, many will have to see good 
earnings before t hey get in the 
buying mood again. 



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9-9 226-5401 / 




NEWS 




Dorms encourage alcohol awareness 



by Andrea Yuhasz 
News Staff Writer 



Clarion University resi- 
dence hall staffs and hall 
councils worked together to 
present a series of events 
aimed at irrforming students 
about alcohol. TTie programs 
coincided with National Col- 



legiate Awareness week 
wMch runs from October 18- 
25. Helping out with publicity 
was Mary Walters, Assistant 
to the Dean of Student Life 
Services and Director of 
Orientation. Walters was in- 
volved with a similar program 
two years ago at Ohio State 




University. Although Walters 
believes such programs are a 
good way of providing infor- 
mation, ^e thinks that alcohol 
awareness should be more of 
a year-round effort. 

Each dormitory sponsored 
a different presentation on al- 
cohol use. On Sunday, Oct. 18, 
Campbell Hall sponsored a 
"Cheers" hTse bar for resi- 
dents. Pubfic Safety officers 
Heam and Thorton gave a 
lecture aititled "I Fought the 
Law" about driving under the 
influence, and showed two 
VCR movies about D.U.I. The 
Adult Probation Officer from 
the Qarion County courthouse 
spoke about what happens 
with court procedures and 
probation for alcohol related 
violations. 

The Assistant Director of 
the Pennsylvania State Police 
division of Liquor Control En- 
forcement spoke to the resi- 
dents about underage drink- 
ing at bars and at parties. Di- 



ana Anderson, Greek Advisor 
and Special Activities Ser- 
vices spoke about her job and 
about the new group 
B.A.C.C.U.S. forming on 
campus, which encourages 
the mature use of alcohol. 

Due to liability problems, 
the volunteer demonstration 
slated to show the effects of al- 
cohol was cancelled. But, field 
sobriety tests were demon- 
strated on volunteers. 

Resident Assistants Mike 
Palicia and Missy Shreffler 
were responsible for arrang- 
ing and running the Campbell 
Hall presentation. Although 
turnout wasn't really big, Pal- 
icia said, "We were happy 
with the format we used. 
There was more action with 
the people, more interaction." 

liirough October 21 dorms 
sponsored different alcohol 
awareness activities. Becht 
Hall hosted speakers from 
M.A.D.D. (Mothers Against 
Drunk Driving) . Nair Hall had 



a trivia bowl, and Becht and 
Ballentine Halls sponsored a 
non-alcholic mixer. 

Some important facts that 
students should know about 
alcohol are: 

1. The most common serv- 
ings of beer (12 ounces), wine 
(5 ounces) and distilled spirits 
(IV4 ounces) contain equal 
amounts of alcohol. 

2. Drinking slowly, eating 
beforehand and snacking as 
you drink all slow down the ef- 
fects of alcohol. 

3. If you think you have had 
too much to drink, stop and 
eat something substantial. Of 
course, if you have had too 
much to drink you should 
never attempt to drive. 

4. It is a myth that a cold 
shower or lots of coffee will 
help you sober up. They may 
help you wake up but the al- 
cohol level in your body will 
remain the same. 



AIDS programs initiated 



by Jim Hesch, 
News Staff Writer 



Future Planning Senior Bruce Anderson decides which courses he will 

take in order to graduate this spring. Photo by Peter B. McMlllen, 

Staff Photographer 



Growing concern for the 
prevention of AIDS (Acquir- 
ed Immune Deficiency Syn- 
drome) has prompted several 
universities in the state sys- 
tem to implement programs 
in AIDS education and pre- 
vention. lUP has made con- 
doms available in their health 
center and Millersville Uni- 



CUP professor to present series 



Dr. P. Diane Snyder, as- 
sistant professor of library 
science at Clarion University 
of Pennsylvania, will present 
a series of workshops, "Inte- 
grating Information Manage- 
ment Skills Into Curriculum 
K-12," during October. 

The workshops are part of a 
program sponsored by the Di- 
vision of School Library 
Media Services of the Penn- 
sylvania State Department of 
Education. Snyder will speak 
in Edinboro, Oct. 27; Indiana, 
Oct. 28, and Ebensburg, Oct. 
29. 

"Tlie workshops are design- 
ed to educate school admini- 
strators and librarians on 
Qiapter Five curriculum reg- 
ulations and to integrate infor- 
mation-management skills 
into the classroom," said Sny- 
der. ""Riese are vital skills 
students need to develop." 
Copter Five requires Penn- 



sylvania students at each 
level of education (elemen- 
tary, junior high, and high 
sdiool) to have at least 30 
hours of library instruction. 
School librarians are expected 
to provide the leadership in 
implementing these regula- 
tions. 

These new regulations also 
require a certified librarian 
for each secondary school 
bmlding and one at the ele- 
mentary level. School districts 
throu^iout the state will be 
audited at random to de- 
termine if the regulations are 
being met. 

Snyder already has pro- 
jected attendance ranging 
from a low of 45 to as high as 
110. "I wiU show what a 
planned course is like," she 
said. "I will distribute sam- 
ples of lesson plans and ex- 
jdain how to integrate library 
skills instruction into the cur- 



riculum. I want them to apply 
what is being done and to help 
to eliminate some of the con- 
fusion." 

Dr. Doris Epler, Director 
School Library Media Ser- 
vices Division, State Library 
of Pennsylvania, contacted 
Snyder and asked for her help 
with the program. Epler con- 
ducted the first of the work- 
shops recenUy in Harrisburg 
with Snyder in attendance. 
Four other workshops, under 
the direction of a school librar- 
ian will a^ be conducted in 
western Pennsylvania. 

"Tlie workshops are also 
beneficial to me," said Sny- 
der. "The more I kno^^ about 
the regulations, the better I 
will be able to teach my 
classes." 

OPEN HOUSE 

The Music Department plans an 
open house on Oct. 25. All students in- 
terested in music are welcome. 



versity has established an 
AIDS Review Board. 

Dr. Lawrence Gilford, 
Student Health Services Di- 
rector at Qarion University, 
said that if condoms were to 
be available in the Health (;)en- 
ter, it would only be after 
there was approval from the 
administration. He has no ob- 
jections against having con- 
doms avaUable in the Health 
Center, but said that different 
aspects of the issue should be 
considered first. Legality, 
morality, and budgeting are 
some of those aspects. Dr. Gil- 
ford said that if the issue of 
condom availability at the 



Health Center was ever to 
arise, he may suggest that the 
condoms coiUd possibly be dis- 
pensed through a vending ma- 
chine. 

Gilford, who has been a 
member of the AIDS Guide- 
line Committee with the Uni- 
versity for the last three 
years, has been integrated 
into the health education 
classes. He visits the classes 
and lectures on AIDS and oth- 
er sexually transmitted dis- 
eases. He said that if the stu- 
dents are presented with fact- 
ual material, their decisions 
concerning sex will be more 
responsible. 



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CAMPUS CALENDAR 

ACADEMIC and INFORMATIONAL 

Job Search Series, "How to dine and act fine," Riemer Coffee- \ 

house, 7 p.m. 

Regular Jumma Meeting, Room 40, Campbell, 1 p.m. 

ROTC Ranger challenge competition begins 

AUSA Dining In, 7 p.m. 

High School visitation day 

Music department open house, 2-4 p.m. 

ROTC Ranger challenge competition ends 

Daylight Savings Time ends (turn cloclcs bacl< one hour), 2 a.m. ■ 

Who's Who applications are available, Room 222 Egbert, 

deadline Nov. 2 
Faculty Senate Meeting, 140 Peirce, 4 p.m. 
Athletic Department "Time Out" luncheon, Holiday Inn, 12 noon ; 
Who's Who applications are available 
Who's Who applications are available 
ENTERTAINMENT 

Koinonla VCR night, 7 p.m. 

CB movie "Hoosiers," Mar-Boyd Aud., 8 p.m. 

CAB'S, Harvey Multi-purpose, 9:30 p.m. 

CB movie "Hoosiers," Mar.-Boyd Aud., 8 p.m. 

Madrigal Singers performance, Mar.-Boyd Aud., 8:15 p.m. 



«:•:•:•:•:•:•:•:•:•:• 



■:•:•:•:•>:< 



M 



6-THE CUfllON CALL, Clarion, PA, Thursday, Oct. 22, 1987 



CUP to host congressional hearing 



WASfflNGTON - A con- a.m. in the Still HaU/Carter 

gressional subcommittee Auditorium of Clarion Univer- 

nearing originally set for sity. 

Clarion late last month, but Oinger will be K)ined at the 

which was postponed because hearing by U.S. Reps. Albert 



of unexpected House votes, 
has been rescheduled for Oct. 
26, according to U.S. Rep. Bill 
dinger (R-Pa) who organized 
the hearing. 

The House Subcommittee 
on Environment, Energy and 
Natural Resources will hold 
the hearing beginning at 10 



Bustamante (D-Texas) and 
NickRahalin(D-W.Va.). 

One of the goals of the hear- 
ing will be to determine 
whether federal and state 
laws have had a harmful ef- 
fect on Pennsylvania's sur- 
face coal mining industry. 

dinger said the hearing will 



SA sponsors 
leadership workshops 



The Student Activities Of- 
fice (SAO) will be sponsoring 
the following leadership work- 
shops: Time Management for 
Officers of Campus Organ- 
izations, being held today, and 
Preparing For and Running a 
Business Meeting, on Thurs- 
day, Oct. 29. 

Both of the workshops 
scheduled will be held in the 
Riemer Coffeehouse at 4 p.m. 
on the respective dates. Each 
workshop is expected to take 
60-75 minutes. Sign-up sheets 
for either or both of these 



workshops are available in the 
Student Activities office and 
those who choose to parti- 
cipate may pick up the work- 
shop materials when register- 
ing. 

Last year, when the work- 
shops were first attempted, 
the evaluations provided by 
the participants were positive. 
TTiey provided some excellent 
feedback that the SAO intends 
to incorporate into this year's 
series. For more information, 
contact Hal Wassink, 
Coordinator of Student Ac- 
tivities. 



DINNER FOR 
TWO 
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Phone: 226-4060 




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aUow Pennsylvania residents 
and officials representing the 
full-range of views on coal 
mining an opportunity to voice 
their concerns directly to 
members of Congress who are 
responsible for federal sur- 
face mining law. 

Witnesses scheduled to 
testify at the hearing include, 
Leonard Green, chairman of 
the National Wildlife Federa- 
tion and vice chairman of the 
Pennsylvania Wildlife Fed- 
eration; Wyona S. Coleman of 
the Pennsylvania Chapter of 
the Sierra Club; Anthony Er- 
cole, executive vice president 
of the Pennsylvania Coal Min- 
ing Association; GaryMerritt, 
director of environment and 
energy management of the 



former deputy director with 
the U.S. Office of Surface 
Mining, Reclamation and En- 
forcement. 

"Sending a message to 
Washington is not alwa vs the 
easiest thing to do. That s why 
I decided to bring a littie bit of 
Washington to Qarion," said 
dinger. 

Itie Suriace Mining Control 
and Reclamation Act of 1977 
spells out minimum environ- 
mental protection standards 
and requires that under- 
ground and surface mine 
operators clean up mining 
sites when they are nnished. 

TTie Act also created a spe- 
cial office within the Intenor 
Department to oversee in- 
dividual state programs to 



Pennsylvania Department of regulate mining operations on 



Environmental Resources; 
and Brent Blough, a former 
official with the Pennsylvania 
Department of Environ- 
mental Resources and a 



state and private lands. 
. "Ttiere is a unique sharing 
of responsibility between the 
federal and state govern- 
ments when it comes to reg- 



ulating surface coal mining. 
Unfortunately, there are in- 
stances when this dual role 
has led to a clash of authority, 
duplication of effort and gen- 
eral confusion. This situation 
does not benefit environmen- 
tal concerns, the coal indus- 
try, the state, or its resi- 
d«its,"saidClinger. 

dinger said the congres- 
sional hearing in darion is in- 
tended to identify areas where 
the federal and state oversight 
of the coal program has fallen 
short and where the federal- 
state overlap has actually 
proved counterproductive to 
environmental concerns, the 
coal industry and the state. 

Other witnesses expected to 
testify at the hearing will in- 
clude representatives from 
the environmental commun- 
ity, the coal industry, and the 
Pennsylvania Department of 
Environmental Resources, 
among others. 



Fire safety system adequate 



by Tamara Robinson 
News Staff Writer 



TTie present fire equipment 
for the Clarion Area, as well 
as for Clarion University, is 
not sufficient to reach high- 



truck if the state would pro- 
vide the ladder. The state re- 
fused due to lack of funds. 

Clarion University equips it- 
self with a system approved 
by the Pennsylvania Depart- 
rise buildings. In the event of a wi«it of Labor and Industry, 
fire. Public Safety and ttie According to Randy Adams, 
Clarion Fire Department environmental specialist for 
would be unable to reach Clarion University Public 
beyond ttie tiiird floor in Nair, Safety, "tiie university is com- 
Wilkinson and Campbell mitted to fire safety." 
dormitories. Almost everything in the 

There are not enough funds dormitories is electrically op- 



from the state of 
vania to provide 



Pennsyl- 
a cherry- 
picker, which is a truck with 
an extending ladder. 

Last year there were pro- 
posals from the fire depart- 
ment to the state that the 
county would purchase the 



erated. The electric heaters 
are a big concern. They can 
become very hot and can be 
tiie cause of fires if in direct 
contact with flanmiable ob- 
jects. Such was the case in 
Forest Manor last semester 
when a resident's bed caught 



on fire from an electric heat- 
er. 

Although all rooms are 
equipped with smoke detect- 
ors and every floor has a fire 
extinguisher, these are only 
small safety fumishments to 
contain a fire in a smaU area. 
Fire drills will also be held 
each month, in every dorm. 

Adams says, ''The 
university is near completion 
of a new fire detection system 
that enables a much faster re- 
sponse to a fire, even in an un- 
occupied building. Details will 
be made clear upon comple- 
tion of the system in January 
of 1988. 



Music dept. presents open house 



The second annual open 
house of the darion Univer- 
sity of Pennsylvania Music 
Department is scheduled, 
Sunday,, Oct. 25, 2-4 p.m., 
Room 231, Marwick-Boyd 
Fine Arts Building. 

Dr. Donald F. Black, chair- 
man of the department, said 
students, music directors, and 
guidance counselors are invit- 
ed to attend this event. Black 
has arranged for the music 



faculty, representatives from 
various student performing 
organizations, and an admis- 
sions representative to be 
present to talk informally witii 
those in attendance. Parents 
of freshmen, current CUP stu- 
dents who wish to participate 
in a music organization, and 
CUP students undecided 
about a major and wishing to 
obtain more information are 
also invited to attend. 



Shear Artistry 

ON THE CORNER OF 8th & MAIN 

r tKIVIw ^fmOl) (includes perm, cut & style) 

V/U I w 9aUU (includes shampoo, cut & style) 



HOURS: 
Mon.-Frl.: 9-9 
Sat.: 9-5 



PHONE: 226-6100 
SAT.:9-5 



•WALK-INS WELCOME 
•10% OFF WITH STUDENT ID 



ITie Music Department cur- 
rently offers undergraduate 
degrees in music education, 
music marketing, and music 
performance. Music perform- 
ing organizations include: 
Concert Choir, Madrigal Sing- 
ers/Show Choir, Lyric Thea- 
tre Workshop, Lab Jazz Band, 
String Ensemble, Orchestra, 
Symphonic/Marching Band, 
Brass Choir, and Percussion 
Ensemble. Students may con- 
centrate on the band/orches- 
tra instruments, voice, piano 
and organ. 



SCHOLARSHIP PROGRAM 

Applications for the 1987-88 Paul 
Douglas Teacher Scholarship Pro- 
gram are available at the Financial 
Aid Office. Applicants must be a PA 
resident and must have graduated in 
the top 10% of high school graduation 
class. Sophomores, juniors and seniors 
may now apply. Deadline is Oct. 31, 
1987. 




A blaze of daze. . . .Vicki Lazar is in hot pursuit of the derby atop the head of Matt Tarr. Derby Daze, sponsored by 
Sigma Chi, raises money for Wallace Village. Photo by Peter B. McMHIen, Staff Pfiotograptier 



Cities hit million mark 



San Diego and Dallas be- 
came the seventh and eighth 
cities to hit the one million 
population mark. The last city 
to hit the one million mark 
was Houston. 

The other six cities are New 
York; Los Angeles; Chicago; 
Houston; Philadelphia, and 
Detroit. 

The Census Bureau also 
reported that seven cities 
reached 100,000 for the first 
time, while one city dropped 
below 100,000. 

Pit Bulls 

Joetta Damsladter and Wil- 
liam Rutiedge were acquitted 
last Thursday on involuntary 
manslaughter charges. Both 
Damsladter and Rutiedge 



FROM 

ALL 

POINTS 




Compiled by Vonda Swarts 

News Staff Writer 

are owners of pit bulls. 

The two pit bulls are being 
held in an animal shelter and 
will be destroyed for mauling 



to death a retired Dayton 
doctor. 

Pit bulls have been getting a 
lot of attention lately with 
good reason. Since July 1983, 
pit bulls have been the cause 
of 21 of 30 dog-bite related 
deaths in the U.S. 

Pressure on Pilots 

Pilots working with Eastern 
Airlines have been under pres- 
sure to fly unsafe planes in or- 
der to cut costs. 

The Eastern Airline vice 
president denied the charges 
and said it was just a tactic 
being used in a labor dispute. 

One Eastern pilot reported 
that there were around 12 cap- 
tains who have been 
suspended for refusing to fly 
the unsafe planes. 



Gov't, won't punish violators 



WASHINGTON, D.C. (CPS) 
— The Reagan administration 
is refusing to punish states 
that violate civil rights laws 
by failing to desegregate their 
colleges and universities, a 
congressional report released 
Oct. 3 charges. 

The report said internal 
notes obtained from the Edu- 
cation Department's Office of 
Qvil Rights "describe failures 
of the states to eliminate the 
vestiges of illegal discrimina- 
tion. Further enforcement is 
clearly required." 

The notes obtained by Gov- 
ernment Operations Commit- 
tee investigators came from a 
task force assigned to review 
official reports on court-order- 
ed desegregation plans in 10 1 
states. 

In 1969 and 1970, the federal 
government found Arkansas, 
Delaware, Florida, Georgia, 
Missouri, North Carolina, Ok- 
lahoma, South Carolina, Vir- 
ginia and West Virginia in vio- 



lation of the Civil Rights Act 
because they had not elim- 
inated traces of racial segre- 
gation in their higher educa- 
tion systems. A federal court 
ordered the g